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TRIZ and Why it is Important for Six Sigma and Design for ... · PDF fileTRIZ and Why it is...

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  • TRIZ and Why it is

    Important for Six Sigma

    and Design for Six

    Sigma

    Larry R. Smith

    [email protected]

  • Define Measure Analyze Improve Control

    SIX SIGMA PROBLEM SOLVING

    Histograms

    CE Diagrams

    Check Sheets

    Pareto Diagrams

    Flow Charts

    Statistical

    Process Control

    Scatter Diagrams

    7 B

    AS

    IC Q

    UA

    LIT

    Y T

    OO

    LS

    Strongly Used Moderately Used

  • Traditional Problem Solving

    Define

    Problem

    Measure

    Analyze

    Develop

    Concepts Improve Control

    Weak

    Widely Used Techniques Robust Design Reliability

    Analysis

    QFD

  • Outline

    Domain Model

    TRIZ in Six Sigma

    TRIZ in Design for Six Sigma

    Introduction to TRIZ

  • Domain Model of Quality

    Concepts

    Customer

    Domain

    Functional

    Domain

    Physical

    Domain

    Process

    Domain

    {CAs} {FRs} {DPs} {PVs}

  • Levels of Thinking

    Events

    Patterns

    Structure

  • Combined Model

    Events

    Patterns

    Structure

    Customer

    Domain

    Functional

    Domain

    Physical

    Domain

    Process

    Domain

  • Events

    Sales

    Plant Production

    Cash

    Profits

    High

    Break Even

    Low

    Expand

    Contract

    Shut Down

    Negative

    Positive

    High

    Low

    Loss

  • After WWII: Quality Based On

    Inspection Events

    Events

    Patterns

    Structure

    Customer

    Domain

    Functional

    Domain

    Physical

    Domain

    Process

    Domain

    Inspection

    & Problem

    Solving

    Inspection

    DV testing

    Warranty

    & Problem

    Solving

  • Statistical Process Control

    Dr. Deming introduced statistical

    thinking/SPC to Japan after WWII

    He taught Dr. Walter Shewharts

    concepts of PDCA and SPC

    SPC is an excellent method of

    monitoring trends in the Process

    Domain

    Introducing SPC to Japan made

    significant differences in Quality

  • Domain Model

    Events

    Patterns

    Structure

    Customer

    Domain

    Functional

    Domain

    Physical

    Domain

    Process

    Domain

    SPC

    Inspection

    & Problem

    Solving

    Inspection

    DV testing

    Warranty

    & Problem

    Solving

  • Quality Function Deployment

    QFD is a Pattern Level tool in the

    Customer Domain

    QFD is a method for translating the Voice

    of the Customer into the Voice of the

    Engineer

    Quality Tables enable QFD to function

    QFD manages Customer Domain patterns

    so that the events (customer satisfaction,

    customer complaints, warranty) are

    improved

  • Domain Model

    Events

    Patterns

    Structure

    Customer

    Domain

    Functional

    Domain

    Physical

    Domain

    Process

    Domain

    QFD SPC

    Inspection

    & Problem

    Solving

    Inspection

    DV testing

    Warranty

    & Problem

    Solving

  • Domain Model

    Events

    Patterns

    Structure

    Customer

    Domain

    Functional

    Domain

    Physical

    Domain

    Process

    Domain

    QFD SPC

    Inspection

    & Problem

    Solving

    Inspection

    DV testing

    Warranty

    & Problem

    Solving

    DFM FMEA

    Parameter

    Design DFA

    VA/VE

    Systems

    Engineering

  • Focus of Six Sigma and

    Design for Six Sigma

    Events

    Patterns

    Structure

    Customer

    Domain

    Functional

    Domain

    Physical

    Domain

    Process

    Domain

    Inspection

    & Scrap/

    Rework

    Verification Tests

    Warranty,

    Customer

    Complaints

    QFD SPC

    DFM FMEA

    Parameter

    Design DFA

    VA/VE

    Systems

    Engineering

    Axiomatic

    Design

    TRIZ

    Six Sigma Design for Six Sigma

    TRIZ

    Directed

    Evolution

    Axiomatic

    Design

    TRIZ

  • Structure

    Structure is a higher Level of Thinking

    Structure establishes the fundamental architecture of a system responsible for trends

    The structure has greatest leverage when established up-front in the development process and enables patterns and events later in the process to work much better

    TRIZ and Axiomatic Design are tools to aid in creating a good structure

  • Domain Model

    Events

    Patterns

    Structure

    Customer

    Domain

    Functional

    Domain

    Physical

    Domain

    Process

    Domain

    QFD SPC

    Inspection

    & Problem

    Solving

    Inspection

    DV testing

    Warranty

    & Problem

    Solving

    Axiomatic

    Design

    TRIZ

    DFM FMEA

    Parameter

    Design DFA

    VA/VE

    Systems

    Engineering

    Preventative

    Maintenance

    Axiomatic

    Design

    TRIZ

    TRIZ

    Directed

    Evolution

  • Altshuller recognized that the same

    fundamental problems had been addressed

    by a number of inventions in different areas

    of technology

    He also observed that the same fundamental

    solutions were used over and over again,

    often separated by many years

    He reasoned that if the latter inventor had

    had knowledge of the earlier solution, their

    task would have been straightforward

    He sought to extract, compile, and organize

    such information

    Patterns of Invention Genrich S. Altshuller

    (1926 - 1998) - the Father of TRIZ

  • TRIZ is Based on Technology,

    Rather than Psychology

    Key Findings

    Levels of invention

    Definition of inventive problems

    Patterns of invention

    Patterns of system evolution

    Patents *

    (Worldwide)

    * Today over 3,000,000 patents have been investigated.

  • Dealing with Contradictions

    Conventional way compromise or trade-off.

    TRIZ way resolve the contradiction.

    A B

  • Levels of Invention (Solution) M

    ovin

    g t

    o h

    igher

    levels

    of

    innova

    tion

    Level 5: Discovery

    Pioneering of an essentially new system

    Laser, radio, airplane

    Level 4: Invention outside the paradigm

    A concept for a new generation of an existing system, based on changing the principle of performing the primary function

    Jet aircraft, integrated circuit

    Level 3: Invention inside the paradigm

    Essential improvement of an existing system

    Automatic transmission, radio telephone

    Level 2: Improvement

    Small improvements of an existing system, usually with some compromise

    Bifocal glasses, beeper

    Level 1: Apparent (no invention)

    Established solutions; well-known and readily accessible

  • What is an Inventive Situation?

    Known Problem

    New Problem

    New Knowledge

    (Scientific Problems)

    New knowledge applied to known problems.

    Example: New plastics provide strong, lightweight products.

    New knowledge applied to new problems.

    Example: Various uses for lasers (surgery, etc).

    Existing Knowledge

    (Engineering Problems)

    Existing knowledge applied to solve known problems.

    Example: All engineering tasks with generally known solutions.

    Existing knowledge does not provide a satisfactory

    solution.

    We are dealing with an Inventive Situation

    new approach is needed

    No known means for solution

    Involves one or more CONTRADICTIONS

  • Functions

    Functions are conceptual ideas linked with the actions or workings of system or sub-system structures, and are typically expressed using an active verb and a measurable noun.

    Examples: provides training, takes time, increases strength, decreases reliability, increases weight, reduces variability, pumps water, stores ink, indicates temperature, excludes dust, provides lift, delivers pizza, reduces speed, etc.

    System functions can be helpful or harmful, desirable or not desirable, passive or active, useful or wasteful.

  • Contradictions are System Conflicts

    A contradiction occurs when system functions conflict

    A technical contradiction is a situation where an improvement in at least one useful function of a system or sub-system results in the deterioration of or movement off-target of at least one other useful function in the same system or sub-system.

    A physical contradiction is when a function conflicts with itself (a specific function should have two different values at the same time).

  • Technical Contradictions

    As automobile acceleration increases (improvement), both fuel economy and emissions deteriorate

    The brake system is very responsive, but the rotors wear out quickly

    The component is easy to assemble, but difficult to take apart for repair

    The product becomes stronger (improvement), but its weight increases (bad)

    We improve the capability of our workers (good), then they find jobs elsewhere (bad)

    Exercise is good for you,

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