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  • AFRICAN MARKETS

    South Africa R28,50 - UK £9 - USA $15

    Vol.23 / Issue: 4 October - December 2019 Premium Agriculture News In Real Time

    978123456789

    Chemuniqué directors shine at annual AFMA awards 18The Animal Feed Manufacturers Association of South Africa (AFMA) is the official industry representative body of the local feed industry. Their annual AGM is a highlight on the industry calendar, and this year it was all about the Chemuniqué directors!

    License before you leap – SRK 20Clearing of indigenous vegetation, or constructing close to a watercourse or wetland, are among the many activities that could land farm owners and agricultural developers in hot water – if they don’t have the required environmental authorisations.

    Genetic Improvement In Aquaculture Is Key For Food Security 25The State of the World’s Aquatic Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture reviews our use of aquatic genetic resources both in capture fisheries and in aquaculture, in areas under national jurisdiction.

    How to make a living running a small-scale broiler operation 30

    What are big food firms doing about climate change? 10Various food giants are finding innovative ways to reduce their environmental footprint and use their influence to inspire sustainable production along the supply chain

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  • 4 Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 www.agrifocusafrica.com

    PUBLISHING DIRECTOR

    Dowell Sichitalwe

    GENERAL MANAGER

    Munyaradzi Chikuruwo

    CHIEF EDITOR

    Brandon Moss

    [email protected]

    GRAPHICS

    Rekai Musari Mutisi

    Lothbrok Media

    SALES/ADVERTISING

    Tumelo Thebe

    Kyle Young

    Jacques Borrem

    Kagiso Sithole

    Ashton Moss

    Dowell Sichitalwe

    CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

    Linda Nkonde

    Roxanne Ghoreki

    Michaela Van Vyk

    ACCOUNTS

    [email protected]

    CONTACT

    Published 4 times annually by LOTHBROK MEDIA.

    5 The Ferns, 364 Pretoria Avenue Randburg, 2194

    Mail: [email protected]

    [email protected]

    Tell: +27 67 148 7146

    www.agrifocusafrica.com

    The Team

    Advertiser IndexAltra Industrial Motion 2

    Pottinger 3

    Poltek 15

    Polyflex 17

    iGrain 19

    Bonnox 22-23

    Malessani 29

    Granos 33

    KW Grain Storage Back Cover

  • www.agrifocusafrica.com Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 5

    EDITOR’S NOTE‘‘The impact of climate change is becoming more obvious and more pressing” 6

    EVENTS UPDATESSPACE 2019: a great success 8

    COVER STORYWhat are big food firms doing about climate change? 10

    LOCAL NEWSCrop planting drive to improve KZN food security 12

    Kenya Moves Closer To Goal Of 100% Renewable Energy Generation By 2030 13

    Nedbank Announces R25m Boost To Safeguard Water, Bodiversity And Job Security 14

    Lagos To Train 15,000 Youths In Agri-culture Value Chains 15INTERNATIONAL NEWSGlobal Agricultural Tyre Market To

    Value Over $9Bn By 2026 16

    Usa And Ghana Sign Declaration Of Partnership On Food Security 17

    FEATURESChemuniqué directors shine at annu-al AFMA awards 18

    Gates Expands PRO Series Product Line with Launch of Pro1T and Pro2T Hydraulic Hoses for Industrial Appli-cations 19

    License before you leap – SRK 20

    Helping prepare learners for the fourth industrial revolution 21

    AGRIBUSINESS 5 Ways Women Farmers Can Succeed In Agriculture 24

    Genetic Improvement In Aquaculture Is Key For Food Security 25

    CROPSPicking The Right Hybrid 26

    Agricultural Irrigation Machinery Market Is Expected To Reach $24.19 Billion By 2026 27

    MACHINERY Case IH and South Africa distributor Northmec highlight the latest farm equipment and technologies at NAM-PO Cape 2019 28

    POULTRYHow to make a living running a small-scale broiler operation 30

    TECHNOLOGYPrecision Farming Market- Global Re-search Analysis, Trends, Competitive Share And Forecasts 2018 – 2026 32

    Agri Technovation steers SA agricul-ture into the 4IR with new mobile app 33

    Business Directory Listings 34

    Company Listings 40

    Contents

  • 6 Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 www.agrifocusafrica.com

    Sustainability continues to shape the agendas of the world’s leading poultry companies, who are working hard to respond to consumer demands for not only more humanely produced chicken and eggs, but more environmentally sound products as well. Across hemispheres, the impact of climate

    change is becoming more obvious and more pressing.

    Producers large and small have been impacted by droughts and the resultant high costs of feed, water shortages and even barn fires. But waste is a key factor that many poultry producers (and consumers) can take into their own hands to

    better improve environmental metrics.

    Take Ogochukwu Maduako from Nigeria, for example, who’s using egg shells for a wide variety of items from scouring scrubs to fertilizer. Across the world, companies like Cargill and Charoen Pokphand Foods are trying to reduce plastics and their carbon footprints.

    ‘‘The impact of climate change is becoming more obvious and more pressing”

    Editor’s Note

  • www.agrifocusafrica.com Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 7

    The international horticulture trade exhibition HortiFlor Expo, scheduled from 16-18 September 2019, has been rescheduled for the next year, from 10-12 March 2020 in the Harare International Conference Centre, Zimbabwe

    The event will focus on promoting Zimbabwean horticulture to foreign investors and buyers. (Image source: HPP Exhibitions)

    HPP Exhibitions, the organizer, has postponed the event to 2020 following news of fears of fresh unrest in Zimbabwe.

    According to the organizer, the current evolving uncertainty has caused international exhibitors as well as visitors to cancel their planned trips to Zimbabwe, reason why one of the important reasons for holding the fair cannot be met, i.e. promoting Zimbabwean horticulture to foreign investors and buyers.

    Organizers remain confident that Zimbabwe has a bright future in horticulture and very capable to recapture the place of being one of the top three exporting nations of Africa in vegetables, fruits and flowers.

    Financial accessibility, cost competiveness in agribusiness transformation mainly in Kenya, Ethiopia, Tanzania, as well as use of precision farming, hydroponic systems are just some of the highlights at CMT’s 6th Commercial Farm Africa, in Nairobi on 30-31 October, 2019

    The leading agribusiness conference in Africa, organized by Centre for Management Technology (CMT), opens in Nairobi with a key presentation on Kenya’s Agricultural Transformation & Growth Strategy – explained in detail by Dominic Kitaka, Head of Agriculture Transformation Office, Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Fisheries & Irrigation, Kenya. He will highlight vital aspects such as agri-tech, vertical farming and public private partnerships

    The program includes an essential Multi-Stakeholder Dialogue on ‘Access to Innovative Financing’ – focusing on real challenges in financial accessibility, role of commercial banks in long-term investments led by panelists – Olaniyi Oladejo, Operating Partner, Sahel Capital Agribusiness Managers and Edson Mpyisi, Chief Financial Economist / Coordinator, ENABLE Youth Prog. Dept. of Agriculture & Agro-Industry, African Development Bank (AfDB).

    Speaking on Ethiopia’s Agricultural Investment Potential & Opportunity as well as the potential of commercial/mechanized farm projects and the bottleneck of Agri-investment is Horizon Plantations.

    Among successful commercial farming projects in Africa explored are –

    • Coffee Plantation & Processing Plant Investment – Afro-Tsion Farm

    • A Case Study of Large Scale Sisal Farming in Tanzania – Noble Azania Investments

    Olam on the other hand provides its views on AfCFTA via session on ‘Impact of African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) on Agriculture’ highlighting food security balance in Africa, cross border trade and its impact. In addition, LMC International presents the ‘Growth Outlook and Market Prospects for African Agribusiness’ – assessing the potential of key Agri commodities and price forecasts for grains, oil crops and more.

    The summit also focuses on:

    • Data Capturing to Enhance Overall Profitability of a Farming Operation – SGS Precision Farming Services (Corporate Sponsor)

    • Application of Regenerative Agriculture for Today’s Climatic Context: Case Studies – Soil Capital

    • Future Farms: Revolutionizing Crop Farming through Hydroponic Systems and Responsive Drip Irrigation – Hydroponics Africa

    For more information, visit event website or contact Grace at [email protected] or call +65 6346 9147.

    Officials, Plantation Owners, Tech Companies And Funding Agencies To Attend 6Th Commercial Farm

    Africa In Nairobi

    Hortiflor Expo Zimbabwe 2019

    Postponed To 2020

    Events Update

  • 8 Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 www.agrifocusafrica.com

    SPACE 2019 took place from 10 to 13 September at the Rennes Exhibition Centre, in France. This thirty-third edition was a great success and boasted a cheerful and positive atmosphere. All the participants came in "project mode" to partake in the four days of "Planet Livestock". This was a sign of the relatively stable economic situation of our livestock sectors, thanks to a slightly more favourable business climate. Livestock farmers working in all types of animal production were able to enjoy the Expo, which is aligned with the image they have of their profession as a constructive, 21st-century sector.

    SPACE 2019 brought together 1,400 exhibitors from 42 countries, and 105,318 visitors, including 14,706 international visitors from 122 countries. The international attendance, up 2%, reflects the global dimension of this edition. This Expo was marked by the participation of many delegations who came to our great livestock region of Western France to find information on developing animal production in their countries: Russia with its national agency for the development of organic agriculture; China, with a delegation led by the Vice-Governor of Shandong Province; Kazakhstan with its Vice-Minister of Agriculture and its Ambassador to France; and many more. It is also important to point out the participation of many delegations from Africa, the continent in the spotlight this year: Senegal, Cameroon, Nigeria, Mali, Guinea Conakry and Côte d'Ivoire all came to SPACE with very specific objectives of promoting livestock development in their countries.

    This edition was also dedicated to the climate. Farmers are already largely engaged in efforts to combat climate change, and this was clearly demonstrated at the Espace for the Future, with its theme "Climate-Friendly Practices and Technologies". A wide range of pragmatic and financially viable solutions for greenhouse gas reduction, energy production and energy efficient systems in livestock buildings were presented at the Espace for the Future.

    SPACE 2019 once again showcased

    innovation in livestock farming thanks to 46 Innov'SPACE winners and four Top Choice awards. Sustainability, health excellence and animal welfare, digital technology and improved working conditions were the main areas addressed by these new products.

    All these themes were addressed in depth at the nearly hundred conferences and debates on the agenda this year. The full and varied programme makes SPACE an absolutely unique venue for sharing knowledge geared towards promoting and developing agriculture.

    The animal presentations were also very successful this year, with 560 cattle (out of 1,500 candidates) of 13 different breeds, and 180 sheep. Thanks to the variety of breeds present, SPACE promotes genetics at the national and international levels by showcasing these animals and their breeders. The breeds in the spotlight were Salers for beef breeds, and Pie Rouge for dairy breeds. For the first time, the SPACE organised a European Pie Rouge Challenge, with 45 elite animals from France, Belgium and Germany. The Genomic Elite auction, the only one in Europe with 31 lots of seven different breeds, including the Limousine breed returning this year, was also very popular. The highest bid was €8,600. The 33rd SPACE organisers were also happy to announce an exciting European Prim'Holstein challenge coming in 2022.

    SPACE 2019: a great success

    The official visit in the presence of Didier Guillaume, Minister of Agriculture and Food, as well as Loïg Chesnais-Girard, President of the Brittany Region, provided an opportunity for various stakeholders in the livestock sector to express their expectations regarding the future orientations of our agriculture, which is going through a period of transition. During the four-day event, SPACE facilitates interactions and networking in its mission to help farmers cope with the changes occurring in the livestock sectors.

    SPACE opened its doors to aquaculture this year by organising two conferences on the topic, as well as a tour of a fish farm, and by clearly identifying companies offering solutions for this sector. Given the success of this initiative, a special area featuring stands dedicated to fish farming will be set up at SPACE 2020, which will take place from Tuesday 15 to Friday 18 September.

    SPACE 2020: 15 to 18 September at the Rennes Exhibition Centre, in France

    For More Information, Contact: Cecile Berthier [email protected]

    Events Update

  • www.agrifocusafrica.com Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 9

    Poultry Africa 20192-3 October 2019-Kigali, Rwanda

    6th Commercial Farm Africa30-31 October 2019-Nairobi, Kenya

    Hortiflor Expo10-12 March 2020-Harare, Zimbabwe

    Agritechnica 201910-16 November-Hannover, Germany

    Africa Fertilizer Agribusiness Conference

    01-19 October 2019-Cape town, South Africa

    Poultry Africa 201902 - 03 October 19-Kigali, Rwanda

    Tanzania FOODAGRO AFRICA 201917 Oct 1919 October 2019-Dar es

    Salaam, Tanzania

    IAOM MEA Conference & Expo03 -06 November 2019, Dubai, UAE

    African Farming's 2nd Edition Agroinvestment Summit

    02 -03 December 2019-London, UK

    4th Morocco Food Expo 201906 Dec 1908 Dec 19-Casablanca,

    Morocco

    SIEMA Expo 201906 Dec 1908 Dec 19, Casablanca,

    Morocco

    West Africa Agribusiness Show18 Feb 2020 Feb 200-Lagos, Nigeria

    Events

  • 10 Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 www.agrifocusafrica.com

    Words by Glenneis Kriel,

    In the past, the bottom line used to be the be all and end all. But now, more and more food companies are realizing the importance of sustainable development for their future growth and success. Sustainable development is no longer treated as a side project, or a nice-to-have bonus for a company’s PR department, but as an integral part of the overall business strategy, measured and reported on in similar terms as financial reviews.

    While most of these plans also have a social and animal welfare component, here we are focusing on the impressive steps some food companies are taking to reduce their environmental footprints.

    Plastic free Charoen Pokphand Foods PLC (CPF) has vowed to go plastic free by 2030 and reduce waste disposal at all its operations by 30 percent (relative to its 2015 baseline) by 2020. Instead of using plastic bags, in 2006 CPF started using stainless-steel trucks to transfer products in its integrated broiler business. This, according to the company’s annual financial reports, has reduced its plastic usage by 4,300 tonnes and greenhouse gas emissions by 29,000 tonnes. In 2013, the company replaced plastic feed bags with bulk feed tanks. By 2018, this had resulted in a 62 percent reduction in the volume of plastic used in its Thai operations and a 31 percent reduction in its foreign operations. The company in effect was able to remove

    12,400 tonnes of plastic from its operations, translating into a greenhouse gas saving of 36,600 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year. CPF has also developed eco-friendly packaging and in 2015 became the first Thai company to use such trays in chilled raw chicken and pork products. In 2018 this allowed the company to use 60 tonnes less plastic in packaging, which is equivalent to 132 tonnes of carbon emissions.

    Deforestation freeAcknowledging the impact of deforestation on climate change, CPF is training its employees and suppliers to make the most of their natural resources and is also partnering with various public and civil-society sectors to help conserve and restore natural resources within and outside the boundaries of its plants and farms. The company claims it has so far restored 1,613 hectares of mangrove and watershed forest. Multinational giant Cargill, meanwhile, is following this example. Earlier this year, the company published various policies and action plans to ensure company expansions are not at the expense of forests. Heather Tansey, Cargill sustainability director for animal nutrition and North American protein, explained that corn, soy and wheat constitute a large component of poultry feed, so when their poultry supply chains are located in areas that are high-risk for forest land use conversion for feed, they use their new policy to reconcile environmental Disclosure and economic decisions to produce food that is sustainable and nutritious for both people and the planet. But Cargill, like many

    other feed companies, is also contributing to sustainable production by creating balanced feed formulas that reduce wastage. “Sound animal stewardship practices and proper nutrition are not only key factors in raising healthy animals and reducing the production impact to the environment, it’s also simply the right thing to do. Healthy animals are more efficient in terms of growth and feed use,” Tansey said. Besides this, Cargill is taking efforts to enhance farm management through, for example, the use of energy efficient heating and ventilation systems using renewable energy.

    “The plant has allowed the poultry production facility to reduce its

    reliance on the national grid by more than 30 percent, while providing 90

    percent cleaner water, which is reused on the site”

    Biogas production

    RCL Foods, which has more than 240 operations across Africa, made headlines when in 2017 it established Africa’s largest biogas plant in Worcester, South Africa. The plant has allowed the poultry production facility to reduce its reliance on the national grid by more than 30 percent, while providing 90 percent cleaner water, which is reused on the site. The success of the project has spearheaded the development of a similar, but even larger waste-to-value.

    plant at the firm’s Rustenburg chicken-processing facility this year. The company aims to generate 50 percent of its own electricity by 2025 and over the same period reduce its reliance on coal by 50 percent. As one of the top 100 companies on the JSE (Johannesburg’s stock exchange), RCL Foods has taken part in the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) – a UK-based organization which aims to make publishing carbon emissions a business norm for companies around the world – for a number of years. They scored the highest in South Africa’s food, beverage and tobacco sector in the CDP’s 2018 climate change survey, achieving an A- score for the second year running despite a stricter scoring system being implemented.

    “Sustainable production is no longer a nice-to-have, but a business imperative, which is why RCL Foods is working tirelessly to come up with creative solutions to reduce waste, consume less water and fossil-fuel-based energy and do more with what they have,” Ettienne Thiebaut, group sustainability executive at RCL Foods, told The AgriFocus African Markets Magazine.

    What are big food firms doing about climate change?Various food giants are finding innovative ways to reduce their environmental footprint and use their influence to inspire sustainable production along the supply chain

    COVER STORY

  • www.agrifocusafrica.com Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 11

    Measurements and behavioral changes Country Bird Holdings (CBH) is showing what can be done with small interventions and behavioral changes. Since launching its sustainability programme five years ago, the company has managed to increase slaughter volumes by about 10 percent without electricity or water consumption increasing linearly at its processing plants. Marthinus Stander, CEO of CBH, says the company’s efforts

    started with the installation of meters to monitor water, electricity and fuel consumption, followed by staff and supplier education: “Measurements are extremely important, as you need to create a baseline against which company progress can be measured. To allow quick reaction to deviations, measurements are taken daily at our operations and reported monthly to the company at large.” While it’s still early days for the programme, the company has managed to reduce its energy usage through the installation of power correction factors and phase balancing equipment, with a reduction in diesel usage achieved through the replacement of old generators with diesel rail engines that are more fuel efficient.

    Water usage has been reduced from 20 to 15 litres per processed bird, thanks to awareness campaigns whereby visual materials were placed in all the company’s processing operations to educate employees about the importance of water conservation. The company also invested in equipment that is more water efficient. The company is currently installing LED lights in all its facilities to further

    reduce its energy footprint and is evaluating the viability of establishing another biogas facility.

    “We have established a biogas facility at one of our processing plants, which has slightly reduced our dependence on the national grid and resulted in water savings by purifying runoff, which now can be used as grey water,” says Stander. Stander points out that the idea was not to merely to “tick boxes”, but to create interventions with lasting results: “The achieved successes should then set the standards for what should be achieved tomorrow.” While the company’s suppliers have to adhere to strict production protocols in terms of animal welfare and waste management, systems have not yet been introduced to motivate more sustainable practices in the supply chain – though that’s next on Stander’s agenda.

    “We would need to find a way to monitor on-farm environmental practices if we want to expand our efforts to suppliers,” he says. “So far, we have run awareness campaigns to motivate producers to reduce their environmental footprint. This not only makes sense from a conservation point of view, but also a business point of view, since efforts to reduce carbon emissions and water usage usually translate into business savings.”

    “Water usage has been reduced from 20 to 15 litres per processed bird, thanks to awareness campaigns”

  • 12 Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 www.agrifocusafrica.com

    In an effort to create vibrant agricultural communities and improve food security, the KwaZulu-Natal provincial government will this week launch a multimillion-rand Crops Planting Programme in Mkhanyakude District Municipality.

    The R160m programme will see the provincial government providing tractors, farming implements and seeds to hundreds of subsistence and smallholder farmers in all 11 district municipalities in the province.

    The launch on Thursday will be led by KwaZulu-Natal Premier Sihle Zikalala, members of the Provincial Executive Committee, traditional leaders and mayors.

    Speaking ahead of the launch, the MEC for Agriculture and Rural Development, Bongi Sithole-Moloi, said planting crops is one of the provincial flagship programmes that is expected to transform the lives of many small farmers who struggle to produce adequate crops due to the lack of operational farming resources.

    "We have decided to launch it in September, which is the start of the planting season. We

    are excited that the head of the provincial government, will be part of the launch," said Sithole-Moloi.

    Farmer register kicks-offMeanwhile, the technical committee working on Producer Farmer Register (PFR) has started with the pilot project launched recently in Mpumalanga.

    The committee started with the collection of data, where they visited 18 projects based in Ehlanzeni and Bohlabela District Municipalities.

    The project aimed at collecting stats on commercial and non-commercial farmers was established by the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF), assisted by Statistics South Africa.

    Launched in 2019, the project will run until 2021 and is expected to improve the inaccurate and misrepresented statistics of farmers in the non-commercial sector, in particular, smallholder farmers across the country.

    It will establish the number of farms, size of farms, crop types being farmed in different geographic areas, and agricultural inputs such as irrigation usage.

    The establishment of the Producer/Farmer Register for South Africa is going to address the following areas for the sector and the country:

    • Improve the inaccurate and misrepresented statistics of famers in the non-commercial sector, in particular smallholder farmers across the country;

    • Build a basis from which the Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (AFF) sector performance can be measured in the non-commercial sector;

    • Enable the development of indicators in line with Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) and National Development Plan (NDP). These indicators will help to identify progress in achieving government outcomes;

    • Accurately identify smallholder farmers in terms of their geographic distribution and agricultural activities;

    • Establish an up-to-date frame of reference for conducting agricultural sector surveys in the country;

    • Track the impact of agricultural support amongst beneficiaries in agriculture and development of strategies to help producers overcome the challenges related to natural and unnatural disasters; and

    • Account for beneficiaries in agriculture who are entitled to support services.

    Crop planting drive to improve KZN food security

    Local News

  • www.agrifocusafrica.com Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 13

    JOHANNESBURG – Kenya has boosted its power generation capacity and is one giant step closer to reaching its goal of 100 percent renewable energy generation by 2030 after it launched the continent’s largest wind farm.

    Set to contribute 310MW to the national grid, the $680 million privately-funded Lake Turkana Wind Power project will increase the country’s power supply by about 13 percent, reducing the country’s reliance on thermal generated electricity, the Africa Oil and Power Corporation said in a press release.

    With an energy mix that consists of 85 percent renewable energy, Kenya is considered one of the world’s leading countries in the development and implementation of clean energy – particularly in the geothermal sector.

    Kenya’s installed capacity increased from 1,768MW in March 2013 to 2,712MW in 2019 through renewable energy projects including the Garissa solar power and Ngong wind power plants.

    Further, in the last eight months, the country has saved its citizens over KES 8 billion ($77 million) as a result of a decreased reliance on diesel-generated thermal power.

    “The African continent is increasingly tapping into its wind power potential in efforts to close the significant power gap,” said the press release.

    “With world-class developments coming online in countries including South Africa, Nigeria and Ghana, Africa is expected to considerably improve power access through the further integration of clean energy.”

    Kenya Moves Closer To Goal Of 100% Renewable

    Energy Generation By 2030

  • 14 Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 www.agrifocusafrica.com

    Nedbank has committed R25 million towards safeguarding critical water source areas, biodiversity hotspots and rural livelihoods with a strong focus on the Eastern Cape. The money will be spent in partnership with WWF South Africa which has a long working relationship with Nedbank.

    For the past eight years, Nedbank and WWF have partnered to support sustainable farming across South Africa. The next five-year phase of this work will now be scaled up to secure water source areas, strengthen sustainable local economies and improve rural livelihoods to see people living in harmony with nature.

    South Africa is one of the 30 most water-scarce countries across the globe, and recent severe droughts have demonstrated how critical sufficient clean water is to maintaining economic growth and development while ensuring the health and well-being of our citizens.

    A recent WWF and CSIR study revealed that 22 critical water source areas deliver most of South Africa’s freshwater, with just 10% of our land area delivering a staggering 50% of our river flows. In order to protect SA’s water security, WWF-SA has been working with key institutions to define, understand and improve the safeguarding and functioning of these areas to strengthen our national water security.

    Balancing competing demandsThe Eastern Cape is significant as South Africa’s second-largest province with an estimated population of 7 million people comprising some 1.8 million households. It is also home to some of South Africa’s most critical water source areas – delivering close to 20% of SA’s water – and key biodiversity hotspots (including the Grasslands biome) and in urgent need of developing sustained rural livelihoods and employment for the youth.

    Justin Smith, WWF-SA’s business development unit head says that the organisation is focused on scaling-up numerous sector-specific interventions across multiple land-use sectors. “We want to mobilise collaborative efforts through community-public-private-partnerships (CPPPs) and coordinating the various components of our work within integrated landscape hubs, to work collectively at landscape level to balance competing demands and affect change.

    “The landscape level is often the most appropriate level of action between national and local, allowing stakeholders to understand their own impacts and explore their shared risk and joint opportunities while being able to shape and influence the future they wish to see in their region.”

    Supporting local community organisations

    To achieve this, WWF – through the support of this Nedbank partnership – will partner with and support existing local NGOs, community-based organisations (CBO’s), national and provincial/ local government and private sector partners to promote the concept of Landscapes for Livelihoods.

    The success of this approach has been demonstrated in the Eastern Cape’s innovative and highly successful Umzimvubu Catchment Partnership Programme (UCPP), co-founded and led by the Matatiele-based Environmental Rural Solutions (ERS) and Conservation South Africa (CSA).

    Another key area of work will be to encourage agricultural and water stewardship best practice in the dairy, fruit and forestry sectors, particularly in the Kouga and Tsitsikamma regions.

    By taking collective action to safeguard one of South Africa’s key water security and biodiversity hotspot regions, WWF-SA and Nedbank are ensuring that the ecological integrity of these vital catchments are maintained and restored. This will ensure that they continue to provide water, food, livelihoods, generate jobs and develop local SMMEs, and build climate resilience for local and downstream communities who rely on them.

    Driving agricultural sustainabilityJohn Hudson, national head of agriculture for

    Nedbank, says that Nedbank is committed to partnerships that are proven to support sustainability. “Strategically, Nedbank aims not only to be good with money but more importantly to do good with it as well. We are therefore proud to use our core business to drive the sustainability of the agricultural sector, while protecting our country’s water, food and job security and ensuring economic growth for all.”

    “WWF and Nedbank have been working together in various forms for almost 30 years – an incredible example of a long-term NGO/business partnership that continues to evolve and innovate in finding solutions to complex sustainability challenges in South Africa. We commend Nedbank for their investment in a critical environmental and development node for South Africa, and are excited to work with them to help achieve their ambitions under the UN Sustainable Development Goals,” says Smith.

    “We are proud to partner with the WWF on this new partnership,” says Brigitte Burnett, executive head of Sustainability for Nedbank. “In addition to the extensive environmental and community benefits that this partnership will realise, we believe that it will open up new opportunities for us to use our financial expertise to help our clients succeed in this ever-changing and increasingly resource-constrained world.”

    Nedbank Announces R25m Boost To Safeguard Water, Bodiversity And Job Security

    Local News

  • www.agrifocusafrica.com Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 15

    Lagos state government has decided to train and empower around 15,000 youths and the unemployed in the next four years in agricultural value chains

    The training programme aims to improve agricultural production and create employment opportunities.

    The Lagos state commissioner for agriculture Prince Gbolahan Lawal said that the training time period would be reduced to six months from the one year, highlighting that the goal is to increase the human capacity of the youths involved, thus adding to food security in the state.

    As reported in The Eagle Online, Lawal explained that the state’s vision for the next four years includes food security and improved nutrition by using local production, sustenance and resilience agricultural practices, the creation of dignified jobs in the agricultural sector using technology as an enabling tool as well as economic diversification.

    He said, “This training programme will no doubt improve agricultural production, train new sets of farmers that will drive the development of agriculture, create employment opportunities for new generation of youths, contribute to the food security of the state, improve the standard of living of youths through self-sufficiency in

    agro-based enterprises and increase economic activities of the surrounding communities.”

    The state government is expected to extend the school agricultural programme to correctional schools in the state to further stimulate the interest of the youths in agriculture, Lawal added.

    According to him, “The major aim of the school agricultural programme is to promote practical and commercial agriculture among youths in schools within the State with the aim of empowering students with sound and practical knowledge of agriculture to complement the theoretical aspect taught in the classroom.”

    Special themes

    World Expo for Animal Husbandry & Processing

    Come to Utrecht in 2014 and connect to all players in today’s complete meat production chain.

    May 20-22, 2014 | Utrecht, the Netherlands

    MORE INFORMATIONvisit our website

    www.viv.net

    VIV Europe 2014

    S04 AF JanFeb 2014 Poultry_Layout 1 24/02/2014 14:36 Page 13

    Lagos To Train 15,000 Youths In Agriculture

    Value Chains

  • 16 Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 www.agrifocusafrica.com

    International News

    The increasing need for enhanced productivity due to growing food demand globally, has propelled the demand for agriculture equipment. The global agriculture tyre market is estimated to value over $9bn and register a CAGR over 5.2% during the forecast period 2019-2026. This according to a research study on Global Agriculture Tyre Market by FutureWise Market Research.

    Elevation in the fleet size of tractors in developing countries and technological advancements in farming techniques are primary factors stimulating the market growth. Furthermore, modification in tractors has resulted in compatibility with the latest farming equipment which has elevated the adoption, therefore resulting in the propelling the market.

    Government offering attractive subsidies on the purchase of new agricultural machinery and equipment is playing a major role in bolstering the market growth. Awareness among small-scale farmers regarding restoration of organic farming and the role of modern agriculture vehicles is generating high demand for agriculture tyre usage. Expansion of the regional presence of OEMs and favorable foreign trade policies are also expected to spur the agriculture tyre demand.

    Sustainable farming practices are gaining traction to meet the needs of higher agricultural yields. Shrinking cultivation lands induce the need for advanced farming equipment automation which implies increased demand for agricultural vehicles. This, in turn, is augmenting the use of agriculture tyres that

    offer soft footprint tailored based on farm terrain. Also, the already sold agriculture vehicles need periodic maintenance of agriculture tyres fueling the aftermarket demand.

    Factors hampering the agriculture tyre market growth

    • Government inclination to curb harmful environmental impact due to the use of certain farming vehicles.

    • Inverted taxation policy i.e. tax on raw rubber is higher than manufactured tyres.

    • Frequent fluctuations in raw material prices.

    • Farming activities weather dependency.

    The market is classified into by product, by application, by distribution, and by region. Based on by-product the market consists of bias and radial ply tyres. Radial ply tyres are expected to witness notable growth during the forecast.

    Radial tyres are compatible at low pressure and offer much better ride ability than other tyres. Radial ply tyre offer enhanced puncture resistance.

    Due to these factors, there has been a notable demand for radial-ply tyres. Bias-ply tyres are also forecasted to observe substantial growth over the forecast period as these tyres

    last longer, are tougher and relatively low-priced when compared to other tyres. Owing to before-mentioned factors bias-ply tyre is expected to witness an increase in demand.

    Based on application, the market is bifurcated into tractors and harvesters. Tractors are expected to dominate the market. New product development to suit specific farming process is estimated to fuel further growth of the tractor segment. Launch of damage-sensitive crops harvester is augmenting the demand of tractors which in turn is augmenting the growth of the market.

    In terms of region, North America and Europe regions are the global leaders of the market. The utilisation of the latest advanced technologies is driving the growth of the market in these regions. Technological advancements and rising demand for tractors are presumed to boost the presence of the market.

    The Asia-Pacific region is anticipated to witness substantial growth, owing to favourable government policies in developing nations like India and Bangladesh to support and boost the agriculture sector. Rise in population in the region is fuelling the demand for rapid cultivation of crops by employing tractors and harvesters, hence accelerating the demand for agriculture tyres in the region.

    Established players of the market are Bridgestone, Michelin, Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Continental AG, Alliance Tire Group (ATG), CEAT, JK Tyre & Industries Ltd, Trelleborg Wheel Systems, JK Tyre & Industries, CEAT Tyres, and Bridgestone Corporation.

    Global Agricultural Tyre Market To Value Over $9Bn By 2026

  • www.agrifocusafrica.com Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 17

    The US and the Republic of Ghana have signed a declaration of partnership at the African Green Revolution Forum hosted in Accra, to launch a five-year ‘Feed the Future Country Plan’ for Ghana that is set to increase investments in agriculture, build greater resilience and improve household nutrition

    Feed the Future has spurred the investment into maize, rice, soybeans and grew domestic markets by connecting smallholder farmers. (Image source: World Bank Photo Collection/Flickr)

    Feed the Future is the US Government’s global hunger and food security initiative, bringing together investments from 11 US Government agencies to help accelerate Ghana’s journey to self-reliance through agriculture, trade and policy reforms. Through the Declaration, the two nations aligned their priorities for investments in food security, trade, and nutrition in Ghana, in the northern, north-east, upper-east, upper-west regions and in coastal fishing zones.

    The new country plan provides a blueprint to accelerate agriculture-led growth. It also strengthens resilience to better cope with drought and other disasters and supports a well-nourished population, especially women and children. The plan identifies opportunities to leverage private sector investment, expand research in agricultural technology, thus increasing economic growth.

    “The declaration of partnership aligns with the USAID philosophy of assisting partner countries on their respective journeys to self-reliance. In partnership, we commit to engaging the private sector, research and scientific community, and civil society to strengthen the enabling environment to accelerate broad-based, sustainable and inclusive economic growth for a wealthier Ghana,” said the US ambassador Stephanie S Sullivan.

    The initial phase of Feed the Future began operating in Ghana in 2010 and has reduced poverty and stunting in northern Ghana. The 2015 Zone of Influence population-based survey revealed a 12 per cent decrease in poverty from 2012 to 2015 and a 17 per cent decrease in stunting. Feed the Future activities spurred private sector investment for maize, rice and soybeans and grew domestic markets by connecting smallholder farmers to markets. Farmers improved their incomes through increased access to finance, mobile technology, fertilizer and certified seeds. Households benefited from improved nutrition, especially for women of reproductive age and children under five.

    The new plan will build on these gains and expand Feed the Future’s focus on private sector agricultural investment and trade to accelerate economic growth.

    Following the launch, the US Agency for International Development (USAID) hosted an agricultural and food security research event where a diverse set of partners, including government officials, farmers, other agricultural practitioners and private sector firms discussed how Ghana is uniquely positioned to scale its successes by incorporating digital innovations, research and technology into the partners’ agriculture investments.

    Usa And Ghana Sign Declaration Of

    Partnership On Food Security

  • BY ROBYN JOUBERT

    The Barney van Niekerk/AFMA Technical Person of the Year Award is presented to a person who has made an outstanding technical contribution to the benefit of the feed industry in South Africa. Since starting his career as a research scientist at the Agricultural Research Council (ARC), Dr Peter Plumstead has been extensively involved in poultry nutrition with a strong focus on research and product development, locally with various research and industry institutions, and internationally with DuPont. As technical director at Chemuniqué, he works closely with integrators and nutrition consultants in the poultry industry with the aim of improving the efficiency and sustainability of meat production in sub-Saharan Africa by identifying opportunities and executing specific research projects locally and abroad. Peter was actively involved in planning and sourcing external funding to upgrade the poultry research facilities at the University of Pretoria (UP), and he continues to lead several research projects and serve as co-adviser to graduate students at UP. His contribution to local research and his exceptional ability to motivate students to get excited about poultry has developed students and given them global exposure with the projects they are involved in. He understands that investing in future talent is a prerequisite for making a positive contribution to the industry and our country. Peter continues to present his research locally and internationally and is well-known for his ability to present the most technical scientific concepts in a practical and commercially relevant manner. His ongoing passion for research, dedication to the poultry industry, and purposeful investment in developing the future poultry nutritionists of our industry made him the ideal candidate to be this year’s AFMA Technical Person of the Year.

    The AFMA Person of the Year Award is presented to a person who has made an exceptional contribution towards the feed industry over a two-year period. For the past 30 years, Terry Wiggill has dedicated his resources to making a difference to the cost and sustainability of producing food in Africa by searching for new innovations and being the first to bring these technologies to our country. He has made most of his contribution to the industry while standing at the helm of Chemuniqué – a company dedicated to improving the efficiency of livestock production to facilitate efficient meat, milk, and egg production for the region. The company started over 20 years ago when Terry, together with Ashley Shapiro, bought Hochfeld Fine Chemicals, changing the name to Chemuniqué in 1998. Since then, the company has grown significantly in its customer-service offerings through partnerships with leading, scientifically innovative, international organisations, including Zinpro Corporation, DuPont, CJ Bio, Arm & Hammer, and Impextraco. These partnerships also led to the development of an ISO-accredited enzyme analysis laboratory that enables Chemuniqué to produce customer-specific solutions for the South African market, something Terry is particularly proud of. Terry always has been a visionary leader and an animal scientist who has the ability to recognise the potential of new science, with the tenacity to convince others to evaluate new concepts. He is passionate about developing people, contributing time and leadership into local communities like Hlanganani, and putting that same effort into developing young graduates and interns in the business. In a nationwide feed producers marketing survey conducted in 2013, it was clear that Terry’s impact in the industry was derived from his passion to not only add value and a greater purpose of animal and feed production in Southern Africa, but that through his absolute integrity, he had become a key influencer in the feed additive industry. In addition to his scientific acumen, his personal code of ethics and the integrity with which he conducts himself in all spheres of business and his personal life have been unwavering and have shaped Chemuniqué into the company it is today. There is no doubt that over the course of his career, Terry has contributed significantly to shaping the South African feed industry.

    The team at Chemuniqué could not be prouder of these two gentlemen, and we congratulate them on this amazing achievement!

    The Animal Feed Manufacturers Association of South Africa (AFMA) is the official industry representative body of the local feed industry. Their annual AGM is a highlight on the industry calendar, and this year it was all about the Chemuniqué directors! Technical director Dr Peter Plumstead received the Barney van Niekerk/AFMA Technical Person of the Year Award and managing director Terry Wiggill was named AFMA Person of the Year for 2018/2019.

    Chemuniqué directors shine at annual AFMA awards

    Features

    18 Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 www.agrifocusafrica.com

  • www.agrifocusafrica.com Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 19

    LUXEMBOURG CITY, – Gates (NYSE: GTES), a leading global provider of application-specific fluid power and power transmission solutions, has further expanded its PRO™ Series portfolio with the launch of new Pro1T and Pro2T hydraulic hose lines for the European market.

    The Gates PRO Series line of professional-grade hydraulic hoses offers performance specifically tailored to hydraulic applications across multiple end markets. Leveraging Gates’ deep application knowledge, materials science expertise and process engineering capabilities, the full line of PRO Series products delivers performance, reliability and design flexibility to meet the varying demands seen in today’s hydraulic systems.

    The new Pro1T and Pro2T hose lines are added to the PRO Series hose range of smooth hose cover solutions, providing a broad range of products for both first-fit and replacement industrial applications. Gates technical experts and engineers are available to evaluate and optimize customers’ system designs to ensure the right solution for each application. Pro1T and Pro2T meet the EN 857 1SC and 2SC requirements, respectively, and will be available in seven sizes ranging from -4 to -16. Both constructions are being produced in the new Gates manufacturing plant in Legnica, Poland.

    “By continuing to invest in our PRO Series line of hoses and couplings, our customers now have a broad portfolio for selecting the right product for their application,” said Tom Pitstick, CMO and senior vice president of Product Line Management for Gates. “Complementing Gates’ existing line of MegaSys® hoses, the PRO Series line allows us to grow with our existing customers across channels and meet the needs of new customers by providing a broader range of engineering solutions for modern hydraulic applications.”

    Pro1T and Pro2T are specifically being launched in European markets where the EN 857 1SC and 2SC specifications are widely used.

    About Gates Gates is a global manufacturer of innovative, highly engineered power transmission and fluid power solutions. Gates offers a broad portfolio of products to diverse replacement channel customers and to original equipment ("first-fit") manufacturers as specified components. Gates participates in many sectors of the industrial and consumer markets. Gates products play essential roles in a diverse range of applications across a wide variety of end markets ranging from harsh and hazardous industries such as agriculture, construction, manufacturing and energy, to everyday consumer applications such as printers, power washers, automatic doors and vacuum cleaners, and virtually every form of transportation. Gates products are sold in 128 countries across four commercial regions: The Americas; Europe, Middle East and Africa; Greater China; and East Asia

    and India. More about Gates can be found at www.gates.com.

    Media Contact: Tania Bergmans [email protected] +32 53 76 27 17

    Gates Expands PRO Series Product Line with Launch of Pro1T and Pro2T Hydraulic Hoses for Industrial Applications

    PRO Series hoses and couplings broaden solutions for wide-ranging applications and markets

    remove are ones with close physical andbiological similarities to the grain, forexample, weed seeds from wild grasses andother commercial cereals, such as barleymixed with wheat. The physicalcharacteristics most commonly identified asbeing different enough to achievecommercially acceptable levels of impurityseparation are as follows:● Geometric dimensions – These vary

    from grain to grain and the impuritywhich is targeted, but usually includelength, breadth and depth of the grain.Identification of such dimensions allowsthe crude grain sample to be screenedthrough sieves of specific size. The grainwill pass through the round-holed screenwith its vertical axis perpendicular to theplane of the screen. And taking thecross-section of the grain as ‘elliptical’,then the ‘vital statistic’ on which it issized by the screen is its maximumdiameter. Grain is able to pass througha slotted screen with its longest axisparallel to the plane of the screen,provided that the length of the slot ismore than the length of the grain. As thescreen ‘reciprocates’ the grain will alignitself so that it passes through if its

    minimum diameter is less than theopening of the slot.

    ● Weight – This characteristic which ismore correctly called ‘mass’ allows forthe separation of grain and unwantedparticles by utilising differences in thepropensity for materials to ‘float’ in airduring aspiration-based techniques.

    ● Shape or form – variation in the

    morphology (shape) of grains andcontaminating seeds is a useful basisfor separation using science based ondifferent resistances to rolling. Othercharacteristics that may also affectresistance to rolling include whetherthe grain is smooth (glabrous) or hairy(pubescent).

    ● Surface factors – whether the surface ofthe grain is uniformly smooth or unevencaused by the presence of holes andcracks can also be used to identify andremove impurities. This will be of partic-ular importance in grain samplessuffering various types of insect damageor physical damage due to growingconditions (e.g. water relations) or poorlyset and adjusted harvesting machinery.

    ● Colouration – Impurities that possesscontrasting colours to the grain whichthey contaminate can be separated outby using optical equipment. h

    GRAIN PROCESSING

    Whether the surface of thegrain is uniformly smooth oruneven can also be used to

    identify and remove impurities.

    African Farming - January/February 201426 www.africanfarming.net

    The separated and cleaned grains are collected in bowlsand the dust discarded.

    S07 AF JanFeb 2014 Grain_Layout 1 24/02/2014 14:40 Page 26

    Features

  • 20 Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 www.agrifocusafrica.com

    Clearing of indigenous vegetation, or constructing close to a watercourse or wetland, are among the many activities that could land farm owners and agricultural developers in hot water – if they don’t have the required environmental authorisations.

    According to Karissa Nel, principal environmental scientist at SRK Consulting’s Port Elizabeth office, the company is often required to submit ‘Section 24G’ applications on behalf of clients who start work on a site before they have complied with the National Environmental Management Act (NEMA) or other environmental legislation.

    “Section 24G of NEMA provides for a formal application process to rectify activities that began without the required environmental authorisations or licenses,” said Nel. “However, before any authorisation decision is taken, the law allows that an administrative fine of up to R5 million may be levied.”

    The activity could be any of the activities

    listed in the NEMA 2014 EIA Regulations (as amended in 2017) and ranges from residential developments to agricultural activities such as crop fields, piggeries, chicken batteries, abattoirs and commercial composting – including the associated infrastructure such as pipelines and roads. The ‘24G application’, as it is informally called, addresses the unlawful commencement or continuation of an activity for which an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) or a waste management license was required.

    “It does not matter if non-compliance occurred as a wilful unlawful act or whether a party was completely unaware of the requirements of the environmental legislation,” Nel said.

    Neither does the payment of the administrative fine guarantee a successful outcome of the application.

    “Even before payment is made, the competent authority has the discretion to accept or refuse the section 24G application,” said Nel. “Only

    once the application is accepted – and a fine calculated and paid – will the competent authority process and consider the information submitted with the application.”

    The pain does not stop there. The S24G processes can take more than four times longer than a normal environmental assessment process done in good time. Also, interested and affected parties that give input during the public participation process are often not very forgiving, adding additional complexity to the process. The authorities can also put a stop to all activities on site while they assess the environmental impacts and rehabilitate or remediate any environmental damage or pollution that has taken place as a result of the activity.

    The message is clear, she said. The lawful and most efficient way to approach any new activity on your property is to determine the legal requirements upfront, before starting any work that may impact the environment.

    Karissa Nel, principal environmental scientist, SRK Consulting

    License before you leap – SRK

  • www.agrifocusafrica.com Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 21

    With the fourth industrial revolution upon us, the need for skills in Maths, science and computing is greater than ever.

    Two-a-Day, one of the largest employers in the Grabouw area, is well aware of this trend and is already seeking out learners with matriculation certification and especially those with Maths skills. Additionally, the company, one of the shareholders of South Africa’s largest apple and pear exporter, Tru-Cape Fruit Marketing, is making it possible for existing staff and unemployed people who don’t yet have matric, to achieve this. Two-a-Day currently invests about R360 000 annually on the matriculation programme that has about 50 participants.

    Any sign of growth, recovery or renewal is how Green Shoots, the Maths-focussed education company defines the term. In Agriculture it means the same things so the synergy that exists between Two-a-Day’s support of the Green Shoots programme at schools in Grabouw makes sense.

    According to Mark Swartz and Jo Besford, both founders and directors of Green Shoots speaking from their Strand offices in the Western Cape, the on-line Math’s education programme that is available to schools free of charge, has already had massive success in increasing numeracy in one of the foundation subjects.

    “Our role is to add value to the school and their teaching staff”, Swartz says while Besford, who came to South Africa 12 years ago after teaching Math’s in the tough neighborhoods of inner-London schools, comments about the real-time information their Green Shoot programme provides. “Learners and educators have their results almost instantly but, essentially, the platform also immediately highlights areas that learners struggle with and the teaching staff can then support.”

    “Because we align with what the schools are teaching”, Swartz explains, “we support the school and the teachers and the learners benefit.”

    Swartz hails from Botrivier in the Overberg where he was at school with Two-a-Day’s Doctor Anthony Hess. “This was how I got to meet Two-a-Day’s Director of Human Resources, Dimitri Jacobs, who also drives the company’s many corporate social responsibility programmes. I had the opportunity of introducing Green Shoots and our Math’s-support programme to Two-a-Day.” Swartz says.

    “We already assist about 133, 924 learners and 3, 274 teachers in 328 schools as well as provide input during the developmental stage in 15 after-school centres. Now, with Two-a-Day’s help, an initial support of R60, 000 we can help three Grabouw primary schools: De Rust Futura, Glen Elgin and Kathleen Murray,” Swartz says, adding: “While we provide the software in the form of on-line training and testing, it is

    the warmware, the hand-holding and human-component that we provide that seems to add as much value to schools.”

    Beryl Bowers, Curriculum Data Specialist, Zubeida Davids, Curriculum Data Specialist, Jo Besford, Founder/Director and Mark Swartz, Founder/Director.

    Jo Besford says they have a programme with a high-school too which is currently being evaluated. “Maths is a gateway subject. Both Mark and I were Maths/Science teachers and in 2010 we started Green Shoots with the then support of the Human Dignity Foundation as original donor. People have described our business model as odd as school learners or schools never bear the cost of the online programme or support. We understand how tight already limited resources are for school governing bodies and the parents that support them so we only want to be part of the solution and not part of the problem.”

    According to Besford, they support schools around the peninsula and even in the Ceres area where they work, among others with Nduli and Morrisdale Primary Schools. Ceres Fruit Growers, the apple and pear processing and packing business in that region is the other shareholder of Tru-Cape Fruit Marketing and works with Nduli Primary School with a Swop Shop programme where items that can be recycled are exchanged for fruit, vegetables and other necessities.

    “The strategic decision taken by the Western Cape Government to insist on internet access and computers in schools has been the platform on which our success is built,” says Swartz.

    Dr Isabel Tarling reporting on the Integrated Math’s Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 2016-2018 wrote: “District officials indicated that learners’ attainment in Math’s increased by up to 15% during 20176-2018 and attributed this to Math’s Curriculum Online use. Learners attitude towards the subject and confidence in their Math’s abilities also increased during this period. Using state-of-the-art knowledge from the field of learning science, a direct correlation was established between learners’ ability to judge their learning and their actual performance, a measure expressed as the degree of calibration. The analysis of data provides irrefutable evidence that each one of the four outcomes set for the project were met beyond expectation.”

    Swartz comments that schools always had good data but now that is available in real-time. “Within 12 minutes of learners completing modules we can assess where the issues are and these are immediately available to the schools and teaching body via a dashboard that shows a range of useful analyses including a per question breakdown for every learner.

    Besford says that learners who use [email protected], the after-school programme, improve

    in their on-line ranking scores and through competitions are able to pitch themselves against pupils at other schools. “This can be a very empowering. I believes this spills over into increasing confidence and potential.” she ends.

    “Two-a-Day is very proud to be involved with Green Shoots and the schools in our community. We believe that the investment we made at a very early stage of the learners’ development will enhance their chances of pursuing careers that are needed for the future”, says Two-a-Day’s HR Director Dimitri Jacobs.

    Tru-Cape Fruit Marketing’s managing director Roelf Pienaar says that education, in particular in the maths, science and computer-logic subjects, is one of the main keys to unlock future success and sustainable employment. “Green Shoots and other programmes that support learners, need to be encouraged and companies should be inspired by Two-a-Day’s approach to also sponsor and support such programmes where possible.”

    PREPARED BY BRIAN BERKMAN PUBLICITY 083 441 8765

    [email protected],co.za

    Grabouw learners engaging with the programme.

    Helping prepare learners for the fourth industrial revolution

    (From left to right) Beryl Bowers: Curriculum Data Specialist, Zubeida Davids: Curriculum Data Specialist, Jo Besford: Founder/Director and Mark Swartz: Founder/Director.

    Features

  • 22 Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 www.agrifocusafrica.com

    Revolutionary methods of better carefor your livestock, poultry, pets...

    even children

    A moveable penfor sheep, pets & poultry

    Porta-pens weigh only 27kg / 46kg each and are easily handled by two people.

    Porta-pens are supplied in standard heightof 1.2 meter (4’) and standard lenght of 30 meter.

    Unrolling a Porta-pen takes approximatly oneminute. Rewinding after use takes no more than two minutes.

    After unrolling, the mesh is shaped into a widecircular enclosure with maximum of 10 meter (32’). Ends are joined in 2 seconds with a fencing dropper.

    Porta-pens are designed for small livestock, butcan be used for cattle, calves, horses, goats and pigs if iron standards are added at approximately 5 - 6 meter intervals to which the pen is loosely attached with binding wire.

    Porta-pen

    Versatility does not end in its various applications as an instant fence for livestock, but can also be used for the following amazing variety of purposes:

    With conventional support as fixed kraals for sheep, cattle, horses, pigs, goats etc.To create corridors for handeling livestock at milking sheds, dipping tanks etc.As swimming-pool enclosures.As playpens and partitioning for safeguarding small children.

    When Porta-pens are no longer required for their original purpose, they can be cut into shorter lenghts and then used for the following purposes:

    As concrete reinforcements for dam walls, floors etc.As tree guardsAs trellises for climbing plants, sweet peas etc.As garden fencesAs burglar-proofingAs hayracks for cattle or sheepTo support plastic sheeting for garden houses ortunnels for the growing of vegetables, flowers etc.Where to or more units are combined to form a large circle, iron standards must be used. Also if Porta-pens are used for straight line fencing.

    Back by popular demand ! ! ! ! ! !

    With Bonnox, you score between the posts !

    Already, many farmers are aware of Bonnox’s range of fine products: The “Money Saver”, “Close Mesh”, “Kombi Fence”, “Square Mesh”, “Multi Fence” and “Flexi Fence” were all meticulously designed to provide for every possible need. But what sets a manufacturerapart from the rest, is the ability to promptly observe and react to new trends and needs in the market.

    The prefabricated fencing market in Africa currently needs a product which is inexpensive, as farmers are currently required to be thrifty with their money. Therefore, Bonnox decided to introduce their “ Economy “ range.

    The only difference between this fencing and their existing “Elite“ range, is that it is lightly galvanised instead of fully galvanised. Now a farmer can compare “apples with apples“ when comparing Bonnox with competitors’ fencing products.

    “There are lightly galvanised wire fences on the market, but many of our clients ask for it under the

    Bonnox (Pty) LtdPhysical Address: 32 Van Tonder Street, Sunderland Ridge, CenturionPostal Address: P.O.Box 21677, Valhalla, 0137, South AfricaTel: +27 12 666 8717 Fax: +2712 666 9716 Mobile Number: +27 76 169 9068E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.bonnox.co.za

    Standard unit

    10 meterdiameter

    With corridor

    3 Porta-pens

    Permanent fencein series

    2.5mm Wire diameterWeight: 27kg

    3.15mm Wire diameterWeight: 45kg

    Standard height 1.2m Standard length 30m

    Bonnox PORTA PEN ™Versatile and mobile pens for livstock. sheep, goats and pets.

    Vertical and Horizontal wire spacing 100mm x 100mm

    Back b

    y

    Popula

    r

    demand

    .

    1.2mHeight

    Bonnox brand name,”says Anita Gent, Director of Bonnox.

    “We therefore decided to also manufacture an economical version of the nine most popular products in our range of seventy products. This includes the “Money Saver”, “Close Efficient fencing that lasts:

    BONNOX supplies just what you need –quick as a “Flash Mesh” and “Multi Fence” ranges of 1,2m, 1,8m and 2,4 m. This offers the farmer an inexpensive solution of fencing for his stock, small and large game.

    In areas where the effects of the elements are not very harsh on wire fencing, this inexpensive Bonnox will still last for many years, but fully galvanised Bonnox is still recommended for areas where the elements affect fences more severely.

    As the “Elite” and “Economy” ranges look exactly the same, the labels on the existing “Elite” range are green while those on the economical range are royal blue. The price of the economical range is only 75% of the price for the existing range, but it isstill being manufactured with the same Bonnox meticulousness and care. The wire still being from the same supplier.

  • www.agrifocusafrica.com Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 23

    Revolutionary methods of better carefor your livestock, poultry, pets...

    even children

    A moveable penfor sheep, pets & poultry

    Porta-pens weigh only 27kg / 46kg each and are easily handled by two people.

    Porta-pens are supplied in standard heightof 1.2 meter (4’) and standard lenght of 30 meter.

    Unrolling a Porta-pen takes approximatly oneminute. Rewinding after use takes no more than two minutes.

    After unrolling, the mesh is shaped into a widecircular enclosure with maximum of 10 meter (32’). Ends are joined in 2 seconds with a fencing dropper.

    Porta-pens are designed for small livestock, butcan be used for cattle, calves, horses, goats and pigs if iron standards are added at approximately 5 - 6 meter intervals to which the pen is loosely attached with binding wire.

    Porta-pen

    Versatility does not end in its various applications as an instant fence for livestock, but can also be used for the following amazing variety of purposes:

    With conventional support as fixed kraals for sheep, cattle, horses, pigs, goats etc.To create corridors for handeling livestock at milking sheds, dipping tanks etc.As swimming-pool enclosures.As playpens and partitioning for safeguarding small children.

    When Porta-pens are no longer required for their original purpose, they can be cut into shorter lenghts and then used for the following purposes:

    As concrete reinforcements for dam walls, floors etc.As tree guardsAs trellises for climbing plants, sweet peas etc.As garden fencesAs burglar-proofingAs hayracks for cattle or sheepTo support plastic sheeting for garden houses ortunnels for the growing of vegetables, flowers etc.Where to or more units are combined to form a large circle, iron standards must be used. Also if Porta-pens are used for straight line fencing.

    Back by popular demand ! ! ! ! ! !

    With Bonnox, you score between the posts !

    Already, many farmers are aware of Bonnox’s range of fine products: The “Money Saver”, “Close Mesh”, “Kombi Fence”, “Square Mesh”, “Multi Fence” and “Flexi Fence” were all meticulously designed to provide for every possible need. But what sets a manufacturerapart from the rest, is the ability to promptly observe and react to new trends and needs in the market.

    The prefabricated fencing market in Africa currently needs a product which is inexpensive, as farmers are currently required to be thrifty with their money. Therefore, Bonnox decided to introduce their “ Economy “ range.

    The only difference between this fencing and their existing “Elite“ range, is that it is lightly galvanised instead of fully galvanised. Now a farmer can compare “apples with apples“ when comparing Bonnox with competitors’ fencing products.

    “There are lightly galvanised wire fences on the market, but many of our clients ask for it under the

    Bonnox (Pty) LtdPhysical Address: 32 Van Tonder Street, Sunderland Ridge, CenturionPostal Address: P.O.Box 21677, Valhalla, 0137, South AfricaTel: +27 12 666 8717 Fax: +2712 666 9716 Mobile Number: +27 76 169 9068E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.bonnox.co.za

    Standard unit

    10 meterdiameter

    With corridor

    3 Porta-pens

    Permanent fencein series

    2.5mm Wire diameterWeight: 27kg

    3.15mm Wire diameterWeight: 45kg

    Standard height 1.2m Standard length 30m

    Bonnox PORTA PEN ™Versatile and mobile pens for livstock. sheep, goats and pets.

    Vertical and Horizontal wire spacing 100mm x 100mm

    Back b

    y

    Popula

    r

    demand

    .

    1.2mHeight

    Bonnox brand name,”says Anita Gent, Director of Bonnox.

    “We therefore decided to also manufacture an economical version of the nine most popular products in our range of seventy products. This includes the “Money Saver”, “Close Efficient fencing that lasts:

    BONNOX supplies just what you need –quick as a “Flash Mesh” and “Multi Fence” ranges of 1,2m, 1,8m and 2,4 m. This offers the farmer an inexpensive solution of fencing for his stock, small and large game.

    In areas where the effects of the elements are not very harsh on wire fencing, this inexpensive Bonnox will still last for many years, but fully galvanised Bonnox is still recommended for areas where the elements affect fences more severely.

    As the “Elite” and “Economy” ranges look exactly the same, the labels on the existing “Elite” range are green while those on the economical range are royal blue. The price of the economical range is only 75% of the price for the existing range, but it isstill being manufactured with the same Bonnox meticulousness and care. The wire still being from the same supplier.

  • 24 Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 www.agrifocusafrica.com

    While 60-80% of smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa are female, only an estimated 20% are landholders. “With females in farming jobs only making up less than half of the total, we can be certain that women who actually own the farms have numbers that are even less,” says Ray-Ann Sedres, head of transformation at Santam. “At Santam, we remain focused on our efforts to elevate the role of women across various industries, of which agriculture is a key sector.”

    “With our support of organizations such as Buhle Farmers’ Academy, we are kick-starting the careers of emerging farmers through consumer financial education (CFE). Part of the work done is changing perceptions about farming and creating opportunities for a new generation, particularly young black women, to enter the field.

    “Armed with the right skills, real-life experience and business knowledge, these budding farmers can turn their farms into sustainable enterprises, contributing to the agricultural sector, which is vital to the country’s economy and for job creation,” Sedras.

    Samkelisiwe Hadebe, who is heiress to a maize, soybeans and sugar bean farm in Daggakraal, Mpumalanga previously owned by her grandfather, completed a course in livestock production with Buhle Farmers’ Academy in September last year.

    She says that it hasn’t been easy operating as a woman in such a male dominated industry. “A lot of people thought I was pursuing the wrong career path and should focus my attention

    on something more ‘female appropriate’. But I stuck to my guns because I knew that the proof was in the pudding. I started planting my own crops and drawing up business plans and working on financial statements. I didn’t let anyone’s doubts hinder my passion and commitment from my dream.”

    Hadebe has dreams to expand her crop farm into a livestock farm as well as expand sales to reach not only the country, but overseas as well. “I’m quite excited about the future and Santam has played a big role in that,” she notes. “The farm has already received more exposure due to the Santam Transformation video as well as through the funding of my Livestock production diploma, which has enabled me to apply my learnings with the aim of taking my farm commercial. This can only bolster sales which in turn will allow for the growth I’m aiming for.”

    Hadebe shares her top five tips on how other budding woman farmers can succeed in the agriculture industry:

    1. Let’s educate ourselves: Education is key to increasing interest in agriculture for girls and women. After college, I did a diploma in agriculture and that’s where my passion for this industry started. If this was implemented at primary school level already, I believe that more women would be inclined to farming.

    2. It doesn’t happen overnight: I’m not rushing things – I’ve taken the first step into expanding by buying one goat. We tend to be quite impatient as humans and think everything should just happen the moment we decide to invest our efforts, but that’s just not the way things work. Be

    patient with your business and yourself. Taking it a step at a time yields perfection.

    3. Take risks: I’ve had to start from scratch on the farm my grandfather left me. And one tough call I’ve had to make is to come in at lower prices to differentiate myself in the market. Yes, this affects revenue, but I am building a client base and gaining exposure. Nothing worth having is easy. And sometimes you have to take a risk with your business in order to succeed.

    4. Build a strong support network: My mother has been my biggest support since taking over the farm – whether it be with funds to invest in the farm or advice. My family has also been a huge part of helping me run the farm, especially at a time when I can’t afford too many employees. Find your support. Lean on them when you need to. There’s nothing wrong with that.

    5. Adopt an entrepreneurial spirit: The more people are willing to become entrepreneurs, the more this impacts the economy in terms of job creation. And the more women decide to take this road, the more you open up doors for other women.

    “My business is still in its infancy and I’ve only been part of the Santam sponsored CFE programme for nearly a year now, but I’m excited for the prospects. In a few years, I will be running a successful crop and livestock farm, contributing to the economy as well as my community and making my grandfather proud through it all,” concludes Hadebe.

    5 Ways Women Farmers Can Succeed In AgricultureAgribusiness

  • www.agrifocusafrica.com Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 25

    Sustainable aquaculture is attainableThe State of the World’s Aquatic Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture reviews our use of aquatic genetic resources both in capture fisheries and in aquaculture, in areas under national jurisdiction. The first-ever global report of its kind is based on information provided by 92 countries, together representing 96% of global aquaculture production and over 80% of capture fisheries production.

    Aquaculture is lagging far behind terrestrial agriculture – both crops and livestock – in terms of the characterisation, domestication and improvement of its genetic resources for food production. The report concludes that we have the opportunity to significantly enhance sustainable aquaculture production through the strategic management and development of some of the more than 550 species currently used in aquaculture.

    Genetic improvement is the futureAccording to the report, we are still largely farming wild fish, with 45% of cultured species being little different from their wild counterparts. The report also notes that just over half of the reporting countries consider that genetic improvement is having a significant impact on their aquaculture production, in contrast with the extensive use of improved breeds and varieties in livestock and crop production. The report stresses the potential for sustainable production gains through the genetic improvement of farmed aquatic resources.

    “I strongly welcome this report which is the fruit of a multi-year, country-driven process of data collection and analysis,” said FAO director-general Qu Dongyu. “It highlights the pressures that a growing demand for fish and fish products will place on farmed species, their wild relatives, and the habitats they depend on, as well as the opportunities for sustainable growth.

    “This is why it is crucial that we safeguard, manage and further develop the planet’s aquatic genetic resources, allowing organisms to grow, adapt to natural and human-induced impacts such as climate change, resist diseases and parasites, and continue to evolve to help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and our continued fight for a Zero Hunger world.”

    Unleashing the potential of aquacultureAccording to FAO, a growing human population is expected to drive an increase in fish consumption of approximately 1,2% per annum over the next decade. Production of fish and fish products is estimated to reach over 200 million tonnes by 2030.

    Given that production from the world’s capture fisheries has stabilised at approximately 90

    to 95 million tonnes per annum, with nearly a third of marine fish stocks being overfished, there is little scope for additional production in the foreseeable future, except through loss and waste and efficiencies management. The expected growth in demand for fish and fish products, therefore, needs to be largely met from aquaculture. In this context, the responsible and sustainable use of aquatic genetic resources will be essential to fulfil this role.

    Numerous technologies are available to improve aquatic genetic resources with FAO recommending a focus on well-designed, long-term selective breeding programmes, which can increase productivity of aquatic species by 10% per generation.

    Many wild species are under threatThe report notes that all farmed species still have wild relatives in nature, but many of these wild species are under threat and are in need of targeted and prioritised conservation. The report calls on countries to develop policies and actions to address this need.

    According to the report, the most depleted wild relatives of cultured species are Russian sturgeon, huchen, beluga sturgeon, Atlantic salmon and brown trout.

    The report also notes the potential impact of escapes, including non-native species, from aquaculture farms on biodiversity and ecosystems, and calls for the responsible exchange and use of native and non-native aquatic genetic resources.

    Strengthening policies and cross-sectoral approach

    Food and nutrition security depend on a diverse and healthy food basket, of which aquatic food is an important component. Aquatic genetic resources should, therefore, be included in broader food security and nutrition policies.

    These policies must consider long-term development strategies for aquaculture, including the transboundary management of aquatic genetic resources, access and benefit-sharing, genetic improvement and conservation, and must involve many sectors and disciplines to be effective.

    The report also highlights the need for greater awareness and capacity-building to develop and sustain genetic characterisation and improvement, especially in developing countries, including training of geneticists to support selective breeding programmes.

    At the request of FAO’s Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, a voluntary and collaborative policy response is already under development to address the gaps and needs identified in the report. FAO member countries will review and negotiate this response prior to its adoption as a global plan of action for the conservation, sustainable use and development of aquatic genetic resources for food and agriculture.

    Genetic Improvement In Aquaculture Is Key For Food Security

    Wider, appropriate and long-term application of genetic improvement in aquaculture, with a focus on selective breeding, will help boost food production to meet a projected increase in demand for fish and fish products with relatively little extra feed,

    land, water and other inputs, according to a new FAO report.

    Aquaculture

  • 26 Agrifocus African Markets Magazine | October - December 2019 www.agrifocusafrica.com

    Can Farmers Use the Same Criteria When Picking the Right Nitrogen Source?

    I’ve been hearing all the chatter of the field days showcasing the latest and greatest corn hybrids recently. Here are 8 factors farmers should consider before locking in their seed purchases for fall to ensure they get the most bang for their buck according to an article in “Successful Farming”. I am using the 8 factors to discuss ESN.

    1. Yield – ESN gives you the best opportunity to maximize yields by controlling the release of nitrogen and supplying nitrogen when the crop needs it. ESN improves NUE (nitrogen use efficiency).

    2. Risk Management – ESN protects your nitrogen investment longer than any Enhanced Efficiency Fertilizer (EEF) available today and reduces the risk of loss to the environment.

    3. Hybrid Selection – ESN fits best where nitrogen loss is expected, like sandy or clay soils, and has the flexibility to be applied at different times and rates.

    4. Performance – ESN has the most consistent performance of any EEF for availability of nitrogen and especially over untreated nitrogen.

    5. Traits vs Conventional – Data shows that ESN pays for the price/acre difference and gives farmers the best opportunity to maximize yield, therefore maximize profit.

    6. Brand Loyalty – ESN has been used by farmers for over 15 years and farmer retention is very high. Once they use it, they’re hooked.

    7. Discounts – Think of ESN as nitrogen insurance. It has been proven that nitrogen is lost every year (how much is determined by weather, nitrogen source, and application), so why not insure that investment from loss.

    8. Seeding Rates – ESN should be 70% or higher of the total nitrogen required to help maximize yields and performs best in soils where nitrogen losses occur.

    Check out our website, www.smartnitrogen.com, for more information, ROI calculator, and research data.

    Picking The Right Hybrid

    Zimbabwe agreed to buy 150,000 tons of South African maize after a tender five times that size failed, leaving the country short of grain as the number of people without adequate food rises, according to people familiar with the situation.

    The grain is being supplied by Export Trading Group, said the people, who asked not to be identified as a public announcement hasn’t been made. The deal is for white maize, a staple food in Zimbabwe, and specifically non-genetically modified grain.

    The south

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AFRICAN MARKETS South Africa R28,50 - UK £9 - USA $15 Vol.23 / Issue: 4 October - December 2019 Premium Agriculture News In Real Time 978123456789 Chemuniqué directors shine at annual AFMA awards 18 The Animal Feed Manufacturers Association of South Africa (AFMA) is the official industry representative body of the local feed industry. Their annual AGM is a highlight on the industry calendar, and this year it was all about the Chemuniqué directors! License before you leap – SRK 20 Clearing of indigenous vegetation, or constructing close to a watercourse or wetland, are among the many activities that could land farm owners and agricultural developers in hot water – if they don’t have the required environmental authorisations. Genetic Improvement In Aquaculture Is Key For Food Security 25 The State of the World’s Aquatic Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture reviews our use of aquatic genetic resources both in capture fisheries and in aquaculture, in areas under national jurisdiction. How to make a living running a small-scale broiler operation 30 What are big food firms doing about climate change? 10 Various food giants are finding innovative ways to reduce their environmental footprint and use their influence to inspire sustainable production along the supply chain
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