Home >Sports >Why should we worry? The Future of Ageing

Why should we worry? The Future of Ageing

Date post:24-Apr-2015
Category:
View:666 times
Download:1 times
Share this document with a friend
Description:
Presentation by David Sinclair at the British Geriatric Society conference in Belfast in April 2013 which explores the challenges and opportunities of an ageing society.
Transcript:
  • 1. Why should we worry?And why not.David Sinclair, International LongevityCentre UK @ilcuk @sinclairda The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 2. Who are we?The ILC-UK was establishedin 2000 to explore andaddress the impact of ourageing society on publicpolicyWe have a global reach with14 Members of the ILCGlobal Alliance.The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 3. Who do we work with?/Declaration of interests The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 4. Our focus is broad The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 5. Why should we worry?5 reasons to worry Oldest old The cost of ageing Isolation Economic crisis The squeezed middle agedBut opportunities Prevention (Vaccination nutrition pa) Housing Working longer Health developments and new technologyThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 6. Growth in the number of oldest old The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 7. How many centenarians are there? There are currently 11,800 people in the UK who are currently at least 100 (DWP) There are fewer than 100 people who are aged more than 110. (DWP) In 1911 there were just 100 Centenarians living in England & Wales Growth has been about 7% p/a http://www.flickr.com/photos/un_photo/5832 685007/sizes/z/in/photostream/ The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 8. Number of people currently alive who can expectto see their 100th birthday, by age in 2010 The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 9. Life is not easy for the oldest old Three quarters of the oldest old suffer from limiting longstanding illnesses, and one out of three perceive themselves as being in poor health. (Tomassini C, 2005) http://www.flickr.com/photos/pondspider/4170990 903/sizes/m/in/photostream/ almost 50% of men and women aged 80-84 report severe limitations in activities (IFS, 2010) The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 10. And many find it difficult to do day to day tasksSixty per-cent of over 90s reportdifficulties shopping for groceries,almost a quarter report difficultiesmaking telephone calls and 35% http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinkchocola te/3039589789/sizes/m/in/photostream/report difficulties managingmoney. (Sinclair, 2010/ELSA) The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 11. A relatively high proportion live aloneOf those living in privatehouseholds, four in tenvery old men and sevenout of ten very oldwomen live alone. Oneout of five very oldpeople live in communalestablishments.(Tomassini C, 2005). http://www.flickr.com/photos/sbeebe/5154169795/si zes/m/in/photostream/ The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 12. Most centenarians consult their GP98% of centenariansand nearcentenariansconsulted a GP andreceived prescriptionmedicine during followup. (Roughead, http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwjensen/2288339230/sizes/m/in/photostream/Kalisch et al, 2010) The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 13. Centenarians do use drugs heavilyA study of 602 centenarians inItaly found that a very highproportion of this age group wereusers of drugs. 5% no drugs. 13% one drug a day 16% took 2 drugs per day 65% took three drugs a day 5.5% more than 3 drugs a day. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 14. Some evidence of longer hospital staysCentenarians who had suffered from a hip fracturebetween 2000 and 2007 compared to a randomlyselected control group of 50 hip fracture patientsaged between 75 and 85. the mean stay in acuteorthopaedic wards for centenarians was 20.7 daysand for the control group was 14.9 days.The longer acute hospital stay in the centenariancohort would amount to a mean extra cost of 2511per patient. (Verma et al) The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 15. Depression 23% of those aged 85 and over had levels of depressive symptoms indicative of clinical relevance Almost 13% of men and women aged 80 and over had high levels of depressive symptoms in 2008-09 http://www.flickr.com/photos/junglearctic/300 but not in 2002-03 (IFS, 2010) 2442666/sizes/m/in/photostream/ ELSAThe International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 16. Falls 60% of interviewees aged over 90 had had a fall and that of these, 4 in five were unable to get up after at least one fall and almost a third had lain on the ground for an hour or more. Call alarms were widely available but not used.(Fleming and Brayne, 2008; Cambridge City over 75- Cohor. BMJ) The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 17. Poverty is a very real challenge There is evidence that the oldest old (aged 85 and over) are, as a group, at greater risk of poverty than younger older people (aged 65-85) Up to 10% of the oldest old have total net wealth of 3,000 or less. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.
  • 18. Dementia among centenariansThe prevalence ofdementia-freesurvival past 100years of age variedbetween 0 and 50percent.

Click here to load reader

Embed Size (px)
Recommended