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In terms of intellectual insight and emotional depth, Tabi Bon- ney’s latest album, Summer Years , is a wasteland devoid of both of those things. Summer Years, for the most part, is just a compila- tion of trite, marketable hip-hop songs, rather than an album con- veying something deeper. Bash- ing Tabi Bonney or Summer Years would be too easy — in fact, de- spite its surface-level flaws, the al- bum has a fair amount of merits all its own. While the West African-born, Washington D.C.-raised Tabi Bonney is interesting within him- self, the most redeeming quali- ties of Summer Years come pre- dominately from producer Ski Beatz. Beatz, after a lengthy hiatus from hip-hop, got back into the game fairly recently, producing for artists such as Bonney, Murs and Curren$y. Prior to his break, Beatz had amassed an impressive resume of artists he’s collaborat- ed with, including the likes of Lil Kim, Nas and Jay-Z. While the majority of the al- bum’s beats are compelling and en- joyable, Beatz fails to deliver at cer- tain points on the record, name- ly on the track “Hello & Good- bye,” which is laden with irritat- ingly high synth lines and poorly executed subtle dubstep wobbles that don’t really make sense on the song or the record, given the lack of dubstep influences elsewhere on Summer Years . The production on “Frontin” misses the mark as well in its resemblance to a failed Soulja Boy beat. In its entirety, Beatz does a very interesting and praise-worthy job of creating electro-infused beats that exist within a very unique space previously unoccupied by Hip-hop. For the goal he’s trying to achieve (creating an upbeat, hip-hop re- cord with mass appeal), Bonney does a good job with the frame- work Beatz lays for him. Bonney makes songs that are just fun and don’t require a lot of thought, and Summer Years definitely exem- plifies this. The record isn’t con- scious on any level, but Bonney makes it easy to have a great time — and that, combined with Beatz’ seasoned prowess, make Summer Years a record worth streaming at the very least. Almost 20 years ago, South Aus- tin Music owner Bill Welker picked up the phone at his store and heard a voice on the other end ask for the guitar strap department. “Small of a store as I am, I thought that was pretty humorous,” Welk- er said. “I put him on hold and then I got right back on the line. I said, ‘This is Billy in guitar straps, how can I help you?’” The potential customer asked if the store carried a specific elas- tic strap. When Welker said he did, the caller told him he was with sing- er/songwriter James Taylor’s tour group, and could he please deliver the item to the Four Seasons Hotel as soon as possible? “I get to the Four Seasons think- ing I was going to meet James Tay- lor’s guitar player or someone in the band,” Welker said. “But then I’m standing in the lobby and here comes James Taylor. When you grow up listening to ‘Sweet Baby James’ and all those hits, and then you get to meet the writer, that’s pretty special.” Meeting his childhood idol was a highlight of Welker’s long career at South Austin Music, but he has no shortage of good memories. Oct. 1 marked the official 25th anniversary of the store’s opening, according to the original resale certificate Welker still has hanging above the counter. The business owner started the store after graduating with a busi- ness degree from Midwestern State University. Although he doesn’t play any instruments, he put himself through school working at a music shop in Wichita Falls. “A lot of people have a natural ability when it comes to the guitar, and there are some people that re- ally have to work at it pretty hard,” Welker said. “I’m one of those that had would have had to work at it re- ally hard. I know a lot about guitars from years of experience, but my main interest is helping musicians.” He said the store, which has been in the same location on South La- mar Boulevard since it opened, looks a lot different than it did 25 years ago. Today it is covered floor to ceiling with guitars, banjos, amps and every conceivable accessory. In 1986, Welker said South Aus- tin Music only had six or seven gui- tars in its inventory, but he tried to build up his business by taking customer’s requests. Brent Wilson, a longtime South Austin Music employee and guitar player, said Welker still has the same “we’ll get you what you need” atti- tude he had when the store opened. “He tries to support his customers by going to see them play live when- ever he can,” Wilson said. “After working a full day and going home to take care of three kids, it would be just as easy to say ‘I’m tired, I don’t want to go out.’ But that’s not what he does.” By building relationships with Austin musicians, Welker tries to ensure there’s always a few people in the shop testing out the instru- ments. But in an economy where many people are strapped for cash, Welker said it can be difficult con- verting browsers into customers. Sometimes the shop can feel more like a museum than a guitar store. “I tell everyone to make sure they’re having conversations with people,” Welker said. “You might be talking about music, or instru- ments. You might even just be talk- ing about the weather. When you have conversations with people in your store, it always leads to some- thing and you hope that it leads to future business.” Hispanic studies junior Adri- an Haynes lives close to South Aus- tin Music and has been visiting the store for the past four years. Sever- al months ago, he brought his gui- tar into get serviced before record- ing an EP with his band. “It’s like taking your car in to get it fixed,” Haynes said. “You don’t want someone you don’t know messing with your car, and it’s the same with this. I know the guys there and feel comfortable around them.” Taking up residence next to the Trailer Perk, a coffee and deli trailer that shares its name with the food trailer park on East Sixth Street and Comal, the self-proclaimed king of ravioli, Regal Ravioli, is serving up handcrafted and locally sourced pockets of love. Regal Ravioli’s menu offers five ravioli fillings (beet, squash, mush- room, cheese and sausage with bell peppers) and five sauces (lamb Bo- lognese, marinara, pecan pesto, ve- loute and vegetable ragu), to en- courage entree customization. For those who are a little indeci- sive or apprehensive when fac- ing these unusual ravioli stuff- ings, the friendly trailer staff offers pairing suggestions. The squash ravioli, made with roasted butternut squash and a kick of poblano pepper for an unexpected hint of heat, is complemented by the creamy veloute sauce and plated in a disposable paper basket with a sprin- kling of chopped green onion. The eye-catching yellow squash filling al- most perfectly matches the trailer’s cheerful paint job and mingles beau- tifully with the white cheesy sauce and the green onions for a rich, but- tery symphony of flavor. Regal Ravioli’s cheese ravio- li topped with the lamb Bolognese sauce is a tasty version of an Italian classic. The cheese stuffing features four types of typical Italian cheeses: ricotta, mozzarella, fontina and Par- mesan, with a noticeable presence of extra virgin olive oil and lemon for added flavor. When paired with the sweet, wine-laced lamb sauce, it be- comes a dish that is reminiscent of old Italy, yet modern. Portions are fair, with eight gen- erously-sized, though difficult to eat, ravioli per dish and a slice of bread. For those with smaller appetites, their servings are plentiful. Howev- er, sporks are not made for ravenous ravioli consumption. For good Italian food in Austin, paying $10-$20 per person is to be expected. But for trailer food, one usually expects to pay less than $10. Each entree at Regal Ravioli is $6-$9, which is borderline pricey. Taking into consideration the quality of the food this trailer produces, a roman- tic dinner for two with a bill around $20 bucks isn’t too outrageous. The trailer park Regal Ravioli oc- cupies is clean, with plenty of seat- ing. As the sun sets on Austin’s east side, despite its flaws, Regal Ravioli is a fantastic place to stuff yourself. It would be an understate- ment to define Prince Rama as a band that is out of this world. Their eclectic blend of psyche- delic, Arabian-esque chords and avant-garde, minimalist instru- mentation results in a sound that is part Animal Collective, part The Velvet Underground. Having released four albums since 2007, Prince Rama ven- tures into an even larger, psy- chedelic abyss in their latest re- lease, Trust Now. Trust Now, the band’s second release from Paw Tracks, the record label run by members of Animal Collective, shows the band is still trying to chan- nel their inner weirdness, while also incorporating a more di- gestible song-writing formu- la. Unfortunately, the band falls short in their delivery, picking up momentum halfway through the album with the tracks “Por- taling” and “Incarceration.” “Portaling” sends listeners to a world filled with melod- ic vibes and tribal drums, with splashes and dashes of cymbal hits that provide a smooth tran- sition into a strange, ethere- al void filled with grungy, Lou Reed guitar strumming and ee- rie, echoed vocals from sisters Taraka and Namai Larson. “Incarceration” moves with jangly guitar and thumping toms, while the ‘70s-laced psy- chedelic organ adds tension to a chorus that delivers with dis- torted, Sonic Youth intensi- ty. The Larson sisters sing like an acid-fueled congregation as they make their pilgrimage to- wards musical nirvana. Prince Rama shines when they are not trying to be too weird or eccentric. Where An- imal Collective and even its in- dividual members have learned to connect psychedelic, lo-fi weirdness with pop sensibili- ties, Prince Rama has yet to do so. There are moments when they are on the right track, such as in opening track “Rest in Peace.” Buzzy synths, dark ringing bells and the discor- dant, monastic chants between the Larson sisters make “Rest in Peace” a track that could have been Charles Manson’s burial song. Prince Rama could be like their Paw Tracks label mates, but they fail to captivate at the very beginning of their songs. Most of the songs on Trust Now feel cluttered and not every idea conveyed in each song harmo- nizes well with the rest. Run- ning at six songs, Trust Now does not deliver in a way that is indicative of any growth. The band sacrifices coherence for weirdness, and ends up creat- ing songs that are disconnect- ed from one another. The re- sult is a psychedelic oddity that slumps and staggers towards success, but never gets there. Trust Now is a small step forward from its predeces- sor, Shadow Temple . There are still onslaughts of sound that can be overwhelming, but the album shows flickers of hope in its more cohesive, guitar-driven tracks. Food trailer offers tasty pasta fit for a king L IFE & A RTS 10 Wednesday, October 5, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Aleksander Chan, Life&Arts Editor | (512) 232-2209 | [email protected] Mary Kang | Daily Texan Staff James Palaima tests out a guitar Tuesday afternoon at South Austin Music, located on South Lamar Boulevard. The owner of the store, Bill Welker, concentrates on customer’s requests in running his business. By Lena Price Daily Texan Staff The Summer Years Tabi Bonney Genre: Hip-hop For those who like: Dom Ken- nedy, Smoke DZA, Curren$y Grade: C+ Prince Rama wades deep into psychedelic territory Jono Foley | Daily Texan Staff Regal Ravioli serves up a variety of Italian dishes from their East Sixth and Comal trailer, such as a butternut squash ravioli covered in veloute sauce. WHAT: South Austin Music WHERE: 1402 South Lamar Blvd. WHEN: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Saturday WEB: southaustinmusic.com Regal Ravioli Cuisine: Italian Hours: Lunch, Tues-Fri 11 a.m.; Dinner, Thurs-Sat 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Location: E. 6th and Comal Street Cost: $10-$15 per person Web: regalravioli.com Grade: A- By Eli Watson Daily Texan Staff By Ali Breland Daily Texan Staff Producer’s beats fall flat Music store owner tunes in to patrons Trust Now Prince Rama Genre: Psychedelic rock For those who like: Animal Collective Web: princerama.com Grade: C- ALBUM REVIEW TRUST NOW By Sara Benner Daily Texan Staff ALBUM REVIEW THE SUMMER YEARS RESTAURANT REVIEW REGAL RAVIOLI
Transcript
Page 1: Writing Samples

In terms of intellectual insight and emotional depth, Tabi Bon-ney’s latest album, Summer Years, is a wasteland devoid of both of those things. Summer Years, for the most part, is just a compila-tion of trite, marketable hip-hop songs, rather than an album con-veying something deeper. Bash-ing Tabi Bonney or Summer Years would be too easy — in fact, de-spite its surface-level flaws, the al-bum has a fair amount of merits all its own.

While the West African-born, Washington D.C.-raised Tabi Bonney is interesting within him-self, the most redeeming quali-ties of Summer Years come pre-dominately from producer Ski Beatz. Beatz, after a lengthy hiatus from hip-hop, got back into the game fairly recently, producing for artists such as Bonney, Murs and Curren$y. Prior to his break, Beatz had amassed an impressive resume of artists he’s collaborat-ed with, including the likes of Lil Kim, Nas and Jay-Z.

While the majority of the al-bum’s beats are compelling and en-

joyable, Beatz fails to deliver at cer-tain points on the record, name-ly on the track “Hello & Good-bye,” which is laden with irritat-ingly high synth lines and poorly executed subtle dubstep wobbles that don’t really make sense on the song or the record, given the lack of dubstep influences elsewhere on Summer Years. The production on “Frontin” misses the mark as well in its resemblance to a failed Soulja Boy beat.

In its entirety, Beatz does a very interesting and praise-worthy job of creating electro-infused beats that exist within a very unique space previously unoccupied by Hip-hop.

For the goal he’s trying to achieve (creating an upbeat, hip-hop re-cord with mass appeal), Bonney does a good job with the frame-work Beatz lays for him. Bonney makes songs that are just fun and don’t require a lot of thought, and Summer Years definitely exem-plifies this. The record isn’t con-scious on any level, but Bonney makes it easy to have a great time — and that, combined with Beatz’ seasoned prowess, make Summer Years a record worth streaming at the very least.

Almost 20 years ago, South Aus-tin Music owner Bill Welker picked up the phone at his store and heard a voice on the other end ask for the guitar strap department.

“Small of a store as I am, I thought that was pretty humorous,” Welk-er said. “I put him on hold and then I got right back on the line. I said, ‘This is Billy in guitar straps, how can I help you?’”

The potential customer asked if the store carried a specific elas-tic strap. When Welker said he did, the caller told him he was with sing-er/songwriter James Taylor’s tour group, and could he please deliver the item to the Four Seasons Hotel as soon as possible?

“I get to the Four Seasons think-ing I was going to meet James Tay-lor’s guitar player or someone in the band,” Welker said. “But then I’m standing in the lobby and here comes James Taylor. When you grow up listening to ‘Sweet Baby James’ and all those hits, and then you get to meet the writer, that’s

pretty special.”Meeting his childhood idol was a

highlight of Welker’s long career at South Austin Music, but he has no shortage of good memories. Oct. 1 marked the official 25th anniversary of the store’s opening, according to the original resale certificate Welker still has hanging above the counter.

The business owner started the store after graduating with a busi-ness degree from Midwestern State University. Although he doesn’t play any instruments, he put himself through school working at a music shop in Wichita Falls.

“A lot of people have a natural ability when it comes to the guitar, and there are some people that re-ally have to work at it pretty hard,” Welker said. “I’m one of those that had would have had to work at it re-ally hard. I know a lot about guitars from years of experience, but my main interest is helping musicians.”

He said the store, which has been in the same location on South La-mar Boulevard since it opened, looks a lot different than it did 25 years ago. Today it is covered floor to ceiling with guitars, banjos, amps

and every conceivable accessory. In 1986, Welker said South Aus-

tin Music only had six or seven gui-tars in its inventory, but he tried to build up his business by taking customer’s requests.

Brent Wilson, a longtime South Austin Music employee and guitar player, said Welker still has the same “we’ll get you what you need” atti-tude he had when the store opened.

“He tries to support his customers by going to see them play live when-ever he can,” Wilson said. “After working a full day and going home to take care of three kids, it would be just as easy to say ‘I’m tired, I don’t want to go out.’ But that’s not what he does.”

By building relationships with Austin musicians, Welker tries to ensure there’s always a few people in the shop testing out the instru-ments. But in an economy where many people are strapped for cash, Welker said it can be difficult con-verting browsers into customers. Sometimes the shop can feel more like a museum than a guitar store.

“I tell everyone to make sure they’re having conversations with

people,” Welker said. “You might be talking about music, or instru-ments. You might even just be talk-ing about the weather. When you have conversations with people in your store, it always leads to some-thing and you hope that it leads to future business.”

Hispanic studies junior Adri-an Haynes lives close to South Aus-tin Music and has been visiting the store for the past four years. Sever-al months ago, he brought his gui-tar into get serviced before record-ing an EP with his band.

“It’s like taking your car in to get it fixed,” Haynes said. “You don’t want someone you don’t know messing with your car, and it’s the same with this. I know the guys there and feel comfortable around them.”

Taking up residence next to the Trailer Perk, a coffee and deli trailer that shares its name with the food trailer park on East Sixth Street and Comal, the self-proclaimed king of ravioli, Regal Ravioli, is serving up handcrafted and locally sourced pockets of love.

Regal Ravioli’s menu offers five ravioli fillings (beet, squash, mush-room, cheese and sausage with bell peppers) and five sauces (lamb Bo-lognese, marinara, pecan pesto, ve-loute and vegetable ragu), to en-courage entree customization. For those who are a little indeci-sive or apprehensive when fac-ing these unusual ravioli stuff-ings, the friendly trailer staff offers pairing suggestions.

The squash ravioli, made with roasted butternut squash and a kick of poblano pepper for an unexpected hint of heat, is complemented by the creamy veloute sauce and plated in a disposable paper basket with a sprin-kling of chopped green onion. The eye-catching yellow squash filling al-most perfectly matches the trailer’s cheerful paint job and mingles beau-tifully with the white cheesy sauce and the green onions for a rich, but-tery symphony of flavor.

Regal Ravioli’s cheese ravio-li topped with the lamb Bolognese sauce is a tasty version of an Italian classic. The cheese stuffing features four types of typical Italian cheeses: ricotta, mozzarella, fontina and Par-

mesan, with a noticeable presence of extra virgin olive oil and lemon for added flavor. When paired with the sweet, wine-laced lamb sauce, it be-comes a dish that is reminiscent of old Italy, yet modern.

Portions are fair, with eight gen-erously-sized, though difficult to eat, ravioli per dish and a slice of bread. For those with smaller appetites, their servings are plentiful. Howev-er, sporks are not made for ravenous ravioli consumption.

For good Italian food in Austin,

paying $10-$20 per person is to be expected. But for trailer food, one usually expects to pay less than $10. Each entree at Regal Ravioli is $6-$9, which is borderline pricey. Taking into consideration the quality of the food this trailer produces, a roman-tic dinner for two with a bill around $20 bucks isn’t too outrageous.

The trailer park Regal Ravioli oc-cupies is clean, with plenty of seat-ing. As the sun sets on Austin’s east side, despite its flaws, Regal Ravioli is a fantastic place to stuff yourself.

It would be an understate-ment to define Prince Rama as a band that is out of this world. Their eclectic blend of psyche-delic, Arabian-esque chords and avant-garde, minimalist instru-mentation results in a sound that is part Animal Collective, part The Velvet Underground. Having released four albums since 2007, Prince Rama ven-tures into an even larger, psy-chedelic abyss in their latest re-lease, Trust Now.

Trust Now, the band’s second release from Paw Tracks, the record label run by members of Animal Collective, shows the band is still trying to chan-nel their inner weirdness, while also incorporating a more di-gestible song-writing formu-la. Unfortunately, the band falls short in their delivery, picking up momentum halfway through the album with the tracks “Por-taling” and “Incarceration.”

“Portaling” sends listeners to a world filled with melod-ic vibes and tribal drums, with splashes and dashes of cymbal hits that provide a smooth tran-sition into a strange, ethere-al void filled with grungy, Lou Reed guitar strumming and ee-rie, echoed vocals from sisters Taraka and Namai Larson.

“Incarceration” moves with jangly guitar and thumping toms, while the ‘70s-laced psy-chedelic organ adds tension to a chorus that delivers with dis-torted, Sonic Youth intensi-ty. The Larson sisters sing like

an acid-fueled congregation as they make their pilgrimage to-wards musical nirvana.

Prince Rama shines when they are not trying to be too weird or eccentric. Where An-imal Collective and even its in-dividual members have learned to connect psychedelic, lo-fi weirdness with pop sensibili-ties, Prince Rama has yet to do so. There are moments when they are on the right track, such as in opening track “Rest in Peace.” Buzzy synths, dark ringing bells and the discor-dant, monastic chants between the Larson sisters make “Rest in Peace” a track that could have been Charles Manson’s burial song.

Prince Rama could be like their Paw Tracks label mates, but they fail to captivate at the very beginning of their songs. Most of the songs on Trust Now feel cluttered and not every idea conveyed in each song harmo-nizes well with the rest. Run-ning at six songs, Trust Now does not deliver in a way that is indicative of any growth. The band sacrifices coherence for weirdness, and ends up creat-ing songs that are disconnect-ed from one another. The re-sult is a psychedelic oddity that slumps and staggers towards success, but never gets there.

Trust Now is a small step forward from its predeces-sor, Shadow Temple. There are still onslaughts of sound that can be overwhelming, but the album shows flickers of hope in its more cohesive, guitar-driven tracks.

Food trailer offers tasty pasta fit for a king

ENT P10

LIFE&ARTS10Wednesday, October 5, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Aleksander Chan, Life&Arts Editor | (512) 232-2209 | [email protected]

Mary Kang | Daily Texan Staff James Palaima tests out a guitar Tuesday afternoon at South Austin Music, located on South Lamar Boulevard. The owner of the store, Bill Welker, concentrates on customer’s requests in running his business.

By Lena PriceDaily Texan Staff

The Summer YearsTabi BonneyGenre: Hip-hopFor those who like: Dom Ken-nedy, Smoke DZA, Curren$y

Grade: C+

Prince Rama wades deep into psychedelic territory

Jono Foley | Daily Texan Staff Regal Ravioli serves up a variety of Italian dishes from their East Sixth and Comal trailer, such as a butternut squash ravioli covered in veloute sauce.

WHAT: South Austin Music

WHERE: 1402 South Lamar Blvd.

WHEN: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Saturday

WEB: southaustinmusic.com

Regal RavioliCuisine: ItalianHours: Lunch, Tues-Fri 11 a.m.; Dinner, Thurs-Sat 5 p.m.-10 p.m.Location: E. 6th and Comal StreetCost: $10-$15 per personWeb: regalravioli.com

Grade: A-

By Eli WatsonDaily Texan Staff

By Ali BrelandDaily Texan Staff

Producer’s beats fall flat

Music store owner tunes in to patrons

Trust NowPrince Rama

Genre: Psychedelic rockFor those who like: Animal CollectiveWeb: princerama.com

Grade: C-

ALBUM REVIEWTRUST NOW

By Sara BennerDaily Texan Staff

ALBUM REVIEWTHE SUMMER YEARS

RESTAURANT REVIEWREGAL RAVIOLI

Page 2: Writing Samples

THE DAILY TEXANwww.dailytexanonline.comServing the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900Wednesday, November 11, 2009

55LowHigh

77

TOMORROW’S WEATHERNEWS PAGE 6Blackboard gets

a little competition

Austin’s veteran employment rate garners praise

Obama eulogizes Fort Hood’s fallen

By Molly TrieceDaily Texan Staff

The city of Austin was award-ed the 2009 National Outstand-ing Large Employer of the Year award Tuesday by Disabled American Veterans. Austin was the only municipality nominat-ed for the award.

The city employs more than 1,200 military veterans, Nation-al Guard and service members, 250 of whom are disabled. Oth-er award nominees were mostly corporations or private firms.

The award ceremony was held at the Palmer Events Cen-ter and hosted around 350 vet-erans and also recognized five city employees for their indi-vidual work in assisting vet-erans. Police Chief Art Aceve-do, Assistant Fire Chief Jim Ev-ans, Fire Battalion Chief William Duncan, APD human resourc-es officer Greg Olsen and the city’s veterans’ consultant Allen Bergeron all received the Patriot Award from the Texas Commit-tee for Employer Support for the Guard and Reserve.

“They go above and beyond

what they’re regulated to do,” said Kyle Carvell, city of Austin spokesman.

The event also featured May-or Pro Tem Mike Martinez, who participated in efforts to assist veterans in reintegrating into society.

“I’ve been around military my entire life, and I’ve always

been keenly aware of the im-pact that service men and wom-en have had on my life and the lives of all those in the U.S.,” said Martinez.

Texas spends $7,546,051 per year on benefits for the state’s 1,705,311 veterans. The cere-mony featured representatives and information from different

programs and services in Aus-tin, including the Texas Veter-an Leadership Program. The program links veterans who fought in the wars in Afghan-istan and Iraq with fellow vet-erans in the community for ad-vice on overcoming various ob-stacles toward reintegration, ac-cording to the Veterans Affairs’ Web site.

“We spend three months try-ing to join the military, but when we discharge [soldiers] there’s nothing as in depth for reinte-grating into society as when we send them off,” said Jason Du-ran, a TVLP board member.

Duran said he likes the pro-gram because of its community roots. Officers work in a specific community, so they understand what returning soldiers need to adjust, he said.

“When [soldiers] meet some-one else who served in the Af-ghan or Iraq war, they’re going to open up quicker because of that shared experience,” Duran said.

Veterans of Foreign Wars of the

By Shabab SiddiquiDaily Texan Staff

A look back at the college appli-cation process may remind many students of the hair-tearing, aspirin-popping fall semester of their se-nior year in high school.

That same process probably isn’t any less chaotic for someone serving in the military in Iraq or Djibouti.

The American Council on Edu-cation launched a Web site Tuesday to help army veterans apply to col-leges and obtain education benefits outlined by the Post-9/11 GI Bill.

Molly Corbett Broad, the coun-cil’s president, said the Web site — www.todaysgibill.org — is there to “demystify” the college application process for veterans.

The Web site outlines reasons for pursuing higher education, the

steps that need to be taken and the benefits the benefits for which each individual qualifies. It also provides tools for veterans to choose majors and institutions and highlights suc-cess stories of other veterans who have taken the college route.

The Post-9/11 Veterans Educa-tional Assistance Act of 2008 gives any person who served in the mili-tary for 90 days or more after Sept. 10, 2001 the right to 36 months of tuition and fee benefits at any pub-lic higher-education institution, as well as stipends for housing, books, counseling and tutoring. Any un-used benefits can be transferred to spouses or children. A person needs to serve a minimum of three years to receive full coverage but is eligi-ble for partial coverage otherwise.

By Lena PriceDaily Texan Staff

FORT HOOD — As Command Sgt. Maj. Donald Felt called out the names of each person shot during last week’s attack on Fort Hood, the wounded sol-diers present at Tuesday’s ceremony re-sponded with cries of “Here, Sergeant Major!”

But in between the voices of the Army troops who survived the attack, Felt and the 15,000 people attending the ceremo-ny heard 13 empty silences. They rep-resented the soldiers who weren’t able to answer — the men and women who had been killed by alleged gunman Maj. Nadal Hasan — in one of the worst

mass shootings on a U.S. military base in history.

It was a somber moment for the crowd, most of whom were dressed in military fa-tigues, who gath-ered at the III Corps Headquar-ters to honor the victims. President Barack Obama of-fered condolences to all of the fami-lies in attendance, and shared the personal stories of the 13 people who died in the massacre.

“Every minute that an American en-

joys life, liberty and the pursuit of happi-ness, that is their legacy,” Obama said.

Although after the memorial service most of the media will clear out and the shooting will eventually fade from the front pages of national newspapers, some soldiers at the service said the base and the surrounding areas are far from being back to life as usual.

Army Spc. Christopher Love, a Fort Hood resident who studies English lit-erature online through UT, said that a visit from the President doesn’t simply erase the memories of last Thursday.

“With this, and even in combat, we

Photos by Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Above, Spc. Brian Hill, who was wounded in Iraq, pays tribute to victims of the Fort Hood shooting at the III Corps Headquarters on Tuesday. “It was a shock because it came from one of our own,” Hill said. “When you are at home, you don’t expect things like this to happen.” Below, Angie Hatla and her daughter, Leslie, pay respect to the 13 shot and killed at Fort Hood. Hundreds of families and civilians joined soldiers in solidarity at a memorial ceremony Tuesday.

Daniela Trujillo | Daily Texan Staff

Korean and Vietnam veteran Ray Dudley tabled at the Veteran’s Luncheon on Tuesday afternoon. Dudley served in the Air Force as a fighter pilot and has 41 decorations, including the Silver Star.

BENEFIT continues on page 2

Somber ceremony acknowledges fallen soldiers in silence

Council launches site to assist GIs with college search

COLLEGE continues on page 2

FORT HOOD continues on page 2

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 12‘June Cleaver

in the new millennia’

SPORTS PAGE 7The home team leads

this week’s top 10

ON THE WEB:Photo gallery

from Fort Hood @dailytexan

online.com

1A11

Page 3: Writing Samples

NEWS Wednesday, November 11, 20092

TODAY’S WEATHERHigh Low

78 52

COPYRIGHTCopyright 2009 Texas Student

Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

THE DAILY TEXANVolume 110, Number 111

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NEWS BRIEFLYDriskill Hotel to close for three days during electrical repairs

The historic downtown Driskill Hotel will be closed from Nov. 22 to Nov. 24 for electrical renovations.

Brett Boreing, the hotel’s market-ing director, said the improvements are being made to the hotel’s electri-cal system.

Boreing said the renovations ap-ply to the main electrical lines that feed into the building, requiring the closure of the building.

The changes are taking place shortly before vacation-heavy Thanksgiving to minimize the loss of business.

“We want to make sure that the equipment we have is up to date in a very very old building,” he said. “We wanted to make sure we were proactive in making our mechanical systems up to date.”

Located on the corner of Sixth and Brazos streets, the 123-year-old hotel features 189 guestrooms and suites, and is a member of the His-toric Hotels of America.

“A number of Austin citizens kept this place open during the wrecking ball several decades ago,” Boreing said. “We certainly want make sure their efforts are paid back. We believe [in investing] in the mechanical systems to make sure the Driskill is around for an-other 100 years.”

— Shabab Siddiqui

United States is a program that assists returning soldiers and also those currently deployed, through various activities, in-cluding fundraising for phone cards and care packages to send overseas. Ray Dudley, a pro-gram member, said the organiza-tion played a key role in lobbying Congress to pass the G.I. bill and increase funding from the De-partment of Veteran Affairs.

“Everybody supports veter-ans on Veterans Day, but what

we need is support throughout the year,” Dudley said.

Last year, the VFW hosted an event for homeless veterans, who the VA estimates number up to 131,000 across the nation. VFW provided backpacks, haircuts, clothes, food and shots to “get them back on their feet,” Dudley said. Veterans Carlos Molina and Jorge Gonzalez said their experi-ence with programs available in Austin were positive.

“I used all my VA bene-fits plus some,” Gonzalez said. “That’s how I got my degree.”

Michael Washington, UT’s as-sociate director for admissions and the institutional contact for military-related admissions issues, said the Web site works to link the various admissions stages.

“The purpose of the site is to provide a single location for vet-erans,” he said. “It provides a seamless experience for the vet-erans coming back [by] finding a way to consolidate all the servic-es in one location.”

Washington said the major problems veterans face while applying for college are time-sensitive issues, such as appli-cation deadlines. He said most veterans have prior higher edu-cation experience and apply as transfer students.

The Web site deals only with personnel eligible for benefits of the Post-9/11 GI Bill and not other military-related educational initia-tives. This fall is the first semester the benefits are available.

Vasanth Srinivasa, UT assistant registrar and director of veteran enrollment and certification, said there are 225 veterans and 74 chil-dren and spouses receiving bene-fits outlined by the bill at the Uni-versity. Srinivasa said the number increases every day as paperwork filed by prospective recipients is fully processed by the federal government.

The biggest difficulty facing the bill is the large applicant turnout. McKee Andrus, admin-istrative assistant to the registrar, said the Department of Veteran Affairs may take several weeks

to verify an application.The delay can lead to problems

for veterans preparing for college. Journalism junior Bill Bowman, vice president of the Student Vet-erans Association at UT, said while he didn’t have trouble receiving benefits under the bill, some of his friends did and had to take loans out to pay for their first semester.

Bowman served in Fort Hood and Iraq until early 2007, making him eligible for the provisions un-der the Post-9/11 GI Bill. He said he feels the Web site will help solve problems regarding timeliness.

“It’s pretty much the same process as when you’re ap-plying out of high school,” he said. “But I think [the Web site] would be a good resource for consolidating that all together under one source.”

try to maintain at least a neutral attitude so that in the long run we can just get back to the job at hand,” he said.

Love was blocks away from the Soldier Readiness Center when he heard gun shots. He dismissed them as a routine training exercise. But he soon started receiving phone calls, most of them from his wife.

“She always worries when I go overseas,” Love said, “but this was completely different.”

O’Bryant McNeil works as a flight control operator and lives close to where the shooting took place. He said that ever since Thursday the “vibe of the base has been off.”

“Obama can come, but it’s go-ing to take a lot more than that to set us on the right track again,” McNeil said.

The president said that it is never easy to accept the loss of an Amer-ican soldier, but to experience it at home was exceptionally difficult.

“These Americans did not die on a foreign field of battle,” Obama said. “They were killed here, on American soil. This is a fact that makes the tragedy even more painful and even more in-comprehensible.”

The 13 who died in the shoot-ings ranged in age from 19 to 62. Between them, they had 19 chil-dren, and one of them had a baby on the way. Although Obama nev-er mentioned Hasan by name, he did say that no faith could justify such a murderous act.

“For what he has done, he will be met with justice in this world and the next,” Obama said.

Gen. George Casey, chief of staff of the U.S. Army, said the memori-al service hammered the reality of the situation at home — it was “a

kick in the gut.”“Real people are no longer with

us on this Earth,” Casey said. “It hurts, and it brings on difficult questions.”

The suspected harassment Hasan faced because of his faith was one question on the minds of some at the ceremony. Sgt. David Withun said the Army is one of the most di-verse places he has ever worked.

“I’ve worked with every ethnic-

ity and religion imaginable,” Wit-hun said. “Some of the stuff peo-ple are saying makes all soldiers sound like bigots, and that doesn’t jive with me at all.”

Withun said the bottom line is that most soldiers are good people. He remembered the line of soldiers out the door of the Scott & White Memorial Hospital to donate blood just hours after the shooting. So many people were present, the

center had to turn some away.John Hurter, an Army soldier

who has served for three years, also noticed a change in the way civilians acted toward soldiers. More people approached him, of-fering prayers and thanking him for his service.

“This is making the situation global,” said Donny Bretzinger, a soldier who has served for nine years. “It puts a lot of visibility

on Fort Hood and the issues that soldiers are having with deploy-ments and other problems soldiers are having.”

Soldier Jerome Bell said he hopes the incident and the highly publi-cized memorial service will make other soldiers realize that it’s OK to ask for help when you need it.

“With our job comes pride,” Bell said “But sometimes you just have to swallow it.”

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

President Barack Obama speaks to soldiers, families and civilians during the memorial ceremony for the victims of Thursday’s shooting at Fort Hood. “We are a nation that endures because of the courage of those who defend it,” Obama said.

From page 1

COLLEGE: Most vets apply as transfer students From page 1

From page 1

Carmen Sandiego.

FORT HOOD: Soldiers encouraged to seek counsel

BENEFIT: Programs offer key support to needy year-round

2

Page 4: Writing Samples

THE DAILY TEXANwww.dailytexanonline.comServing the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900Thursday, August 27, 2009

SPORTS PAGE 7Fortune smiles on the Longhorns 74

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TOMORROW’S WEATHERLIFE&ARTS PAGE 12Campus lunchfor less than $5

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By Allison HarrisDaily Texan Staff

A trade association for higher education retail re-cently launched an informational Web site to help students and their families take advantage of a new federal tax credit.

The National Association of College Stores, in partnership with the IRS, launched www.textbookaid.org. The Web site explains the American Opportu-nity Tax Credit, which was instituted this year. The new credit applies in 2009 and 2010 and covers up to $2,500 for tuition and related expenses for the first four years of college, which is a $700 increase from the modified Hope credit.

The new credit also expands “related expen-ditures” to include textbooks, supplies and other course materials.

Charles Schmidt, spokesman for the National As-sociation of College Stores, said the organization created the Web site to give students accurate infor-mation about what the association considers a valu-able program.

“In creating the site, NACS wanted students to get the most accurate information possible,” Schmidt said. “Just as college stores are the course-materials experts on their campus, we decided to

By Lena PriceDaily Texan Staff

Though his home was on the East Coast, U.S. Sen. Edward M. Kenne-dy, who died late Tuesday night af-ter a yearlong struggle with a ma-lignant brain tumor, was no strang-er to Austin — or the UT campus.

A former UT student body pres-ident, several professors and a con-gressman recall their personal en-counters with the “The Lion of the Senate” for The Daily Texan.

A champion of equality“We had a reception for Ted

Kennedy, and we presented him with a Stetson [cowboy] hat at a Longhorn football game,” said Frank Cooksey, a former UT stu-dent body president and Austin mayor, as he recalled a Texas spir-it rally that Kennedy attended in late 1960. “He was very person-able and very pleasant.”

Cooksey followed Kennedy’s ca-

reer closely and had the chance to work with him on several occasions as the mayor of Austin. He remem-bers the senator, who played a key role in landmark civil rights and health care legislation, as a champi-on of equality.

“We believed in a lot of the same things,” Cooksey said. “From his first term as a senator, he was com-mitted to the passage of many civ-il rights acts.”

A close friendKennedy’s dedication to health

care became more personal for Ray Marshall, Kennedy’s person-al friend and a professor emeritus at the LBJ School, when both men’s sons were diagnosed with similar types of cancer at the same time.

“His son survived and mine didn’t,” Marshall said. “When we got home from the hospital after our son died, there was Ted Ken-nedy waiting for us on the front

porch. He just had a really unusu-al level of compassion.”

After Kennedy’s son became ill, the nine-term Massachusetts sen-ator became a strong advocate for health care reform.

“He thought it ought to be a fun-damental right for everyone to have quality health care,” Marshall said.

Because of his ability to con-nect with so many people, Mar-shall said the Democratic senator, whose life was marked by scandals and personal tragedy, was able to achieve an almost unheard-of lev-el of bipartisan support in both the House and the Senate. Outside of the Senate, Marshall said Ken-nedy was always great company, had a good sense of humor and displayed a great deal of interest in discussing issues.

“But he also knew the limit on [bipartisan support],” Marshall said. “He thought if you went too far and compromised, you gave

up the integrity of what you were trying to do. That’s what he felt happened with the recent immi-gration reform.”

A hard workerKennedy’s persistence and

hard work still resonates with Bob Mann, a journalism lecturer and former Kennedy press secretary, who wrote speeches for the senator from 1984 to 1987.

“Once you work for Ted Kenne-dy, you always work for Ted Ken-nedy,” Mann said.

Mann remembers finishing one job for the Senator and immediate-ly being rewarded with a list of 10 new tasks.

“But there was no question to his commitment to helping minorities, gay people and women,” Mann said. “He was one of the most cou-rageous people I knew.”

By Audrey WhiteDaily Texan Staff

For many college students, tex-ting has become as natural as talk-ing or eating. Upon hearing the fa-miliar chimes of an incoming text, it is almost instinctive to respond immediately.

But a possible citywide ordinance will force texters to curb those in-stincts while on the road. If passed, the City Council resolution, spon-sored by Mayor Lee Leffingwell, Mayor Pro Tem Mike Martinez and Councilman Chris Riley, means mo-torists cannot write, read and send text messages or use the Internet on a portable device while driving.

According to a recent Virgin-ia Tech study, drivers are 23 times more likely to get into an accident while texting. Out of every six sec-onds, drivers in the test only looked at the road for 1.4 seconds on aver-age. A study by Car and Driver mag-azine found that texting while driv-ing creates a greater level of impair-ment than driving with a .08 blood alcohol concentration.

“I created the Public Safety Task Force three years ago, and we dis-cussed this through the task force,” Martinez said. “At the time, there re-ally wasn’t definitive data, but over the last couple of years, more data has been gathered. Finally, we felt it was enough to show that this was a very unsafe practice. After nothing was enacted by the Legislature oth-er than a ban on school zones, we got

back on the issue of an all-out ban on texting while driving.”

Plan II freshman Kalyn Miller has seen the dangers of texting and driv-ing firsthand and said the law seems like an obvious move for the city.

“My friend and I were going shopping. She was texting while she was pulling out and didn’t see the car speeding down the road,” Mill-er said. “Her whole front end was smashed. Her car took a month to re-pair, and her parents took away her license for six months.”

Under the new law, the penalty for texting while driving will be a class C misdemeanor, punishable by a fine

up to $500. The possibility of a law that will

force drivers not to text frustrates some students.

“If it’s something I have to do, I’m going do it,” said freshman Katelin McCullough. “I think it would be ridiculous to have a consequence. I don’t do it often, and I try not to in high-traffic situations, only like when I’m at a stoplight.”

Several students, even those who admit to texting while driving, are enthusiastic about the law. Some said they hope it will sway the temptation.

“I’ve noticed that I’m much more

distracted if I text and drive,” said Dana Hicks, a graduate student in counselor education. “It’s danger-ous. I think the law is a great idea be-cause then I won’t feel guilty for not texting people back.”

Because texting is not a visible of-fense like speeding or running a red light, it may be difficult for police to enforce. But City Council and police said they hope a law will make peo-ple more conscious of both the safe-ty and legal consequences of texting and driving.

“It’s going to be difficult to try to enforce the anti-texting laws. It depends on how the ordinance is written,” said APD Cpl. Scott Per-ry. “We are hoping drivers will pay more attention to driving their cars instead of looking at their cell phones while driving. With any laws that are passed, we hope that they will increase driver safety as well as safety of pedestrians on the side of the road.”

Seventeen states and Washing-ton D.C. have laws banning tex-ting while driving either in place or set to take effect within the next six months. Plano, a suburb of Dallas, has made it illegal for drivers under 18 to operate cell phones while driv-ing. Starting Sept. 1, Texas will issue a statewide ban on using cell phones in school zones.

The Senate is considering a na-tionwide effort against texting while

By Allison HarrisDaily Texan Staff

JetBlue Airways Corp. is set to become the offi-cial airline sponsor of UT Athletics.

The two groups announced the partnership Wednesday, from which JetBlue will receive an array of advertising opportunities through the department.

JetBlue spokesman Alex Headrick explained why the airline decided to work with UT Athletics.

“Well, Austin is a very important focus city for us, and it demonstrates our commitment to the Austin community,” Headrick said. “It’s also a way to get our brand in front of a lot of fans.”

The sponsorship includes all 20 of UT’s men’s and women’s sports programs, and will give Jet Blue significant exposure at their games.

JetBlue’s sponsorship includes joint marketing promotions and advertising through 2010. The pro-motions include print and online advertisements, e-mail marketing, video board features, contests, giveaways and special game-specific discounts off

Austin, UT remember Kennedy

Late senator’s Austin friends recall his dedication, compassion, service

Texas Student Media File Photo | Courtesy of Bud Mims and the Harry Ransom Center

In this 1960 file photo, Ted Kennedy was introduced at halftime at a football game while visiting the UT campus during John F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign. Former Daily Texan editor Bud Mims recalled that selected Silver Spurs and other campus leaders escorted Kennedy around the 40 Acres.

Web site features tips about tax credit

FEDS continues on page 6

City Council proposes ban on road texting

Photo Illustration by Sara Young | Daily Texan Staff

The Austin City Council is reviewing a proposal today to ban texting or using the internet while driving.

Erik Reyna | Daily Texan Staff

Radio, television, and film junior Evelyn Treviño shops for history books at the University Co-op on Wednesday.

May-Ying Lam | Daily Texan Staff

Dustin Mack, an airport operations supervisor at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, clears props away after a press conference.

JetBlue becomes airline of choice for UT Athletics

JETBLUE continues on page 5

TEXT continues on page 2

KENNEDY continues on page 2

Page 5: Writing Samples

NEWS Thursday, August 27, 20092

TODAY’S WEATHERHigh Low

102 76He’s your boyfriend, you should kiss him.

COPYRIGHTCopyright 2009 Texas Student

Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

THE DAILY TEXANVolume 110, Number 58

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The Texan strives to present all infor-mation fairly, accurately and complete-ly. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail [email protected].

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TEXT: Drivers in violation of proposed law face fines

KENNEDY: Senator is ‘hard to replace’

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2

driving. If they move forward with legislation, states that do not implement bans on texting while driving within a certain time frame would lose 25 percent of highway funding.

“It’s a good idea because it’s a problem everywhere,” Miller said. “I hope there would be few-er accidents and people would feel safer. I don’t feel safe when I see someone talking on a phone or texting in their car.”

The proposal is under review by council members today. If it

is approved by City Council, the city manager would have a few months to prepare the official or-dinance for passage into a law. It is targeted to take effect before the end of the year.

“Especially as we go back to school, this seemed like a time-ly opportunity to raise the is-sue to see if we can get an agree-ment,” Riley said. “We hope it will improve safety on our road-ways. Austin is the most congest-ed mid-size city in the country. This is moving in the direction of improving roadway and person-al safety.”

From page 1 Mann said finding someone to replace Kennedy as an advo-cate for health care reform will be a challenge for President Barack Obama.

“If Ted Kennedy had been sit-ting here during all this silliness that’s going on right now con-cerning health care reform, I can tell you, it would not be happen-ing,” Mann said. “His absence is already being felt there.”

An age-old enthusiasmU.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett Dog-

gett remembers attending an Obama rally with Kennedy and being inspired by the then-76-year-old senator’s enthusiasm.

“He really moved everyone there with his compelling call for change and strong support for Barack Obama,” Doggett said in a statement addressed to The Daily Texan. “Inspired by his life-time of leadership, we must re-double our efforts to provide ac-cess to affordable, quality health

care to all Americans.”

The future of the liberal senateA week before he died, Kenne-

dy wrote a letter to Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick, urging Pat-rick to appoint an interim senator

upon Kennedy’s death to serve until a special election takes place, according to The Boston Globe. The governor said Wednesday that he supports the idea but did not suggest any replacements as of press time.

“When you lose someone with 47 years of experience, they are really hard to replace,” Cooksey said. “Ted Kennedy, along with the rest of his family, had a leg-acy; a place in history that really was very unique.”

Sens. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., left, and Robert Kennedy, D-N.Y., sit together during a session of the Senate Labor Subcommittee in Washington.

Associated Press file photo

From page 1

Page 6: Writing Samples

THE DAILY TEXANwww.dailytexanonline.comServing the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900Monday, October 26, 2009

SPORTS PAGE 12Tigers declawed 52

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TOMORROW’S WEATHERLIFE&ARTS PAGE 7

Cake in a ball

Delayedbenefi tsfrustrateveterans

L!"# L$%& L$'&

Peter Franklin | Daily Texan Staff

Victor Martinez, left, stands beside Roman Ramos, both wearing skull masks known as careta, as they prepare for the parade celebrating Viva La Vida at Plaza Saltillo on Saturday.

Pantry aids jobless, homeless

Fiddler ! ghts decibel level change

Lack of infrastructurestalls renewable energy

By Lena PriceDaily Texan Staff

When students dial the number to check the status of their Post-9/11 GI Bill claims, they are greeted by an automated message urging them to be patient — not all of the requests have been processed yet. But with registration for the spring semester approaching, some students don’t have time to be patient.

Because an unprecedented number of veterans ap-plied for benefits under the new Post-9/11 GI Bill, more than 10,000 students from around the country are still waiting to receive their money from the gov-ernment.

The new bill, which was implemented this August, offers tuition and housing reimbursement to veterans who served in any branch of the military for at least 90 days after Sept. 11, 2001. The number of benefits de-pends on where a veteran goes to school and the type of degree he or she pursues.

By Priscilla TotiyapungprasertDaily Texan Staff

After being enticed by the live music scene, 21-year-old Bobby Fitzgerald packed his fiddle and moved from up-state New York to Austin four months ago, looking for what he thought would be “a fresh start in a fun city” to play mu-sic.

Shortly after moving, he ex-pressed disappointment as he watched restaurant venues cancel performances and end shows early to stay in line with the city’s sound ordinance. The sentiment prompted him, along with friends Will Bun-dy, Marcus Haddon and Cage Spoden, to start the Keep Aus-tin Loud Grassroots Awareness Campaign earlier this month.

“Austin has a thriving mu-sic scene. It’s one of the city’s primary draws,” Fitzgerald

said. “It blows me away when I learn that people are trying to stop that. They’re choking the city out.”

Fitzgerald urged individuals to sign the online Save Austin Music petition after City Coun-cil lowered the maximum res-taurant sound level earlier this year. As of Sunday, the petition has collected more than 1,200 signatures.

On March 12, City Coun-cil approved a revision to the sound ordinance that lowered restaurant sound levels from a maximum 85 decibels to 70 decibels. Outdoor music ven-ues can go up to 85 decibels.

Although a 15 decibel change does not seem drastic, deci-bel levels increase exponential-ly, Fitzgerald said. The sound level of a conversation usually falls between 60 to 70 decibels, a telephone dial tone at 80 deci-

bels and a lawn mower around 90 decibels.

Uncle Billy’s, a restaurant and brewery on Barton Springs Road, has shown support for

the campaign. Some members of the wait staff wear “Keep Austin Loud” T-shirts on the

By Jim PagelsDaily Texan Staff

Wind farms in West Texas make the state a leader in renewable power generation, but a lack of in-frastructure leaves much of their potential electricity output blowing across the plains.

With more than 8,500 megawatts of wind capacity, Texas is the na-tion’s leading producer of wind power. It produces more than dou-ble the amount of wind energy than the next state, Iowa.

But the transmission lines across Texas can only handle about 4,500 megawatts of this production so thousands of megawatts of wind energy go to waste each day.

It only takes one year to build a wind farm but five years to build the power lines to transmit the en-ergy, leaving a major surplus in the amount of power the current cable system can handle, according to the Electric Reliability Council of Texas Web site.

The council manages the current power lines and has been planning for the past two years to regulate the construction of a new system of high-voltage transmission lines. These will allow the distribution of wind energy across what is known as the “grid.”

The vast majority of this power

is generated in West Texas, where wind production has rapidly grown in the past three years, from 2,800 megawatts in 2006, to more than 4,000 megawatts in 2008, to its current capacity of 8,500 mega-watts, said council spokeswoman Dottie Roark.

Roark said a large proportion of this growth is because of the state’s new policy of rewarding environ-mentally friendly companies. By using wind energy, companies re-ceive Renewable Energy Certifi-cates, which can be sold and traded with other companies, she said.

Much of this growth is also due to the deregulation of the Texas en-ergy sector in 1999, which opened up opportunities for more compa-nies to produce their own power, Roark said.

While largely produced in the western half of the state, most wind energy is used by the cities of Dal-las, Houston, Austin and San An-tonio. There are not enough high-voltage power cables to transfer this energy across the state, said Paul Sadler, executive director of the Wind Coalition, a nonprofit as-sociation organized to promote the development of wind energy.

“If you put too much power on the line, it will overload,” Roark

By Rachel PlatisDaily Texan Staff

Just a few streets away from UT at the University Presbyteri-an Church, a food pantry run by a coalition of churches and vol-unteers from the University and the city feeds hundreds of peo-ple a week.

Volunteers from 11 church-es in the University area operate the Micah 6 Food Pantry, which has been serving the communi-ty for about five years. The pan-try takes its name from a Bible verse in the Book of Micah that reads, “What does the Lord re-quire of you but to do justice, to love kindness and to walk hum-bly with your God.”

It takes about 25 to 30 volun-teers per shift to run the pan-try smoothly and to perform tasks such as running the child-care center, bagging groceries or stocking shelves in the pantry. The pantry serves between 450 and 500 people each week dur-ing the one-hour time slots it is open Thursdays and Saturdays.

“A year and a half ago, that number was 200 to 300 peo-ple a week,” said Gretchen Ol-son Kopp, president of the Mi-

cah 6 board of directors. “[The increase] is pretty clearly related to what’s happening in the econ-omy in Austin.”

As more people have lost their jobs, many have had to go through their savings, Olson Kopp said.

“Some people use the pan-try to extend the time that they can survive,” Olson Kopp said. “When someone has to decide

between paying their medical or utility bill or purchasing grocer-ies, the pantry is a resource that can sustain them a little bit lon-ger.”

Every person that shops is shopping for two to three oth-er people, she said, so a donor has the potential to impact more than 1,000 people during a giv-en week.

The 2009 food budget has in-

creased to $52,000 a year to ac-commodate the need, Olson Kopp said, and $30,000 has been raised so far.

About one-third or less of the people that visit the food pantry are homeless, Olson Kopp said. The vast majority are unem-ployed and in housing but don’t have the money to put food on the table.

When visitors enter the pan-try, they are assigned a num-ber. After a range of numbers is called, number holders are al-lowed to descend the stairs into the food pantry’s waiting area to be checked in and to fill out a form that includes questions about name, address, age and household income.

Once a recipient enters the pantry, he or she is given a shop-ping basket to go through the pantry and pick out enough food to fill the basket. Volun-teers are at the end of the pantry to help shoppers bag and carry their groceries.

“One important thing that distinguishes us is the kind of dignity and respect that we

Paul Wentzell | Daily Texan file photo

Texas leads the country in its use of wind energy; future growth of the state’s population will require further development of wind energy.

BILL continues on page 2

Sara Young | Daily Texan Staff

Jon Kemppainen, left, and Dave Bedrich, members of The Swingsters band, perform at Freddie’s Place on Sunday evening.

WIND continues on page 2

INSIDE: Viva La Vida Festival on page 7

PANTRY continues on page 2

Maddie Crum | Daily Texan Staff

Volunteer Greg Sells organizes shelves at the Micah 6 food pan-try at the University Presbyterian Church. The pantry has been serving those in need for over five years.

NOISE continues on page 2

DADAD IL1A11

Page 7: Writing Samples

NEWS Monday, October 26, 20092

TODAY’S WEATHERHigh Low

65 49He was the only

skeleton with a fanny pack.

COPYRIGHTCopyright 2009 Texas Student

Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

THE DAILY TEXANVolume 110, Number 99

25 cents

Main Telephone:(512) 471-4591

Editor:Jillian Sheridan(512) [email protected]

Managing Editor:Stephen Keller(512) [email protected]

News O!ce:(512) [email protected]

Web O!ce:(512) [email protected]

Retail Advertising:(512) [email protected]

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The Texan strives to present all infor-mation fairly, accurately and complete-ly. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail [email protected].

CONTACT US

U.S. emergency in form of H1N1, still no vaccines for UT students

President Barack Obama de-clared the swine flu a national emergency Saturday, but Uni-versity Health Services may not distribute the H1N1 vaccine until late November.

The declaration allows the health and human services sec-retary to waive some hospi-tal requirements to address the growing need for screen-ing and treatment. For exam-ple, hospitals may now request to set up an alternative screen-ing location for patients away from the hospital’s main cam-pus, according to the U.S. De-partment of Health and Hu-man Services.

“The H1N1 epidemic is moving rapidly,” says the de-partment’s Web site. “By the time regions or healthcare sys-tems recognize they are be-

coming overburdened, they need to implement disaster plans quickly. Adding a po-tential delay while waiting for a National Emergency Decla-ration is not in the best inter-est of the public, particular-ly if this step can be done pro-actively as the president has done [Saturday].”

Between Aug. 30 and Oct. 10, states reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Preven-tion nearly 5,000 lab-confirmed H1N1 hospitalizations. As of Oct. 17, 46 states reported con-firmed H1N1 illnesses.

The H1N1 vaccine was avail-able early this month, with the first doses of live attenuat-ed H1N1 flu vaccine adminis-tered Oct. 5, according to the CDC. Administration of the H1N1 flu shot began the week of Oct. 12.

But, according to its Web site, UHS has requested the vac-cine and will offer it to stu-dents, faculty and staff as soon as it can.

— Viviana Aldous

NEWS BRIEFLY

Department of Veteran Affairs spokeswoman Jo Schuda said the department anticipated a backlog of claims because the program is new and the benefits can be used any time in the next 15 years. Students who weren’t planning on enrolling in college this fall still applied as ear-ly as possible, which further backed up the system.

“This new program has a lot more required data than the ex-isting GI Bill,” Schuda said. “It re-quires a more complex IT system that we are in the process of install-ing.”

In addition to the hold-up caused by the number of people who ap-plied, the department could not start processing requests until states set tuition rates for individual uni-versities, Schuda said.

Almost 300 UT students request-ed Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits for the fall semester. Assistant regis-trar Vasanth Srinivasa said there are still some students who haven’t re-ceived their money, but she wasn’t aware of anyone who had to drop out because of it.

The VA offers emergency $3,000 loans to anyone who is still waiting on benefits when tuition payments are due.

Srinivasa said the University has tried to spread information about how obtain the emergency money and encourages anyone still wait-ing for money to contact the VA im-mediately.

“If they are having more prob-lems, we can contact the VA direct-ly,” Srinivasa said. “We’re trying to do anything we can to help these students out.”

Journalism and English senior Brandy Brown, the president of the

Veteran’s Student Association, re-ceived her money from the VA sev-eral weeks ago. She had enough fi-nancial aid to cover her tuition and housing until the money came through.

“I was one of the lucky ones,” Brown said.

Brown said she was frustrated with the University for not setting up a tuition deferment plan for stu-dents who are still waiting on mon-ey this late in the semester.

“I expected to see hold ups with the VA because it’s a new program and we’re dealing with the govern-ment,” Brown said. “But UT has ab-solutely not made exceptions for students who are still waiting.”

Emily Minter, a sociology and premed junior, served for four years in Korea, Fort Hood and Iraq. She did not get her money from VA in time to pay for this semester’s tu-ition and had to apply for one of the emergency checks. The $3,000 and the salary from her job was not enough to cover all her expenses, and she had to take out an emer-gency tuition loan.

“Now, my emergency loan is overdue because I don’t even have enough money to pay it back,” Minter said. “I’m not going to be able to register for classes next se-mester if I don’t get this straight-ened out.”

Minter said most student vet-erans only have time to work and study, and dealing with the VA should not be necessary this late in the semester.

“[The department] needs to fix it for next semester.” Minter said. “We can’t really get any answers out of them, and we don’t know what’s actually taking so long. It’s been ri-diculous, and it’s frustrating be-cause I can’t do anything.”

value and treat everyone with that comes through the pantry,” Olson Kopp said. “Each person who comes in gets a shopping basket to pick the items they need the most.”

UT’s Honors Business Asso-ciation began volunteering with Micah 6 last year and continues to serve the pantry on the first and third Thursday of every month.

“[The experience] gives our members an opportunity to make a difference in our own backyard,” said Michael Daeh-ne, the vice president of external affairs for the business group. “It’s really eye-opening to see the poverty in Austin and to be able to contribute a small part to our community.”

Daehne said that he has had no problem getting organization members to volunteer.

“They gain so much,” Daeh-ne said. “Working and talking with the people who come in the pantry humanizes the homeless population and reminds us that we are all equal.”

Ruby Jaime suffered from a stroke eight years ago that para-lyzed the left side of his body. He is now in a wheelchair, though he said that he has walked and even danced. He said that it could take two hours to receive food.

Jaime knows many of the vol-unteers at the pantry by name, and the volunteers often help him pick out food from his wheelchair.

“When I see people that are hungry, I tell them to follow me to the pantry,” Jaime said.

said. “There are many days when ERCOT tells wind generators that they have to back down.”

The passage of Senate Bill 20 in 2005 helped jump-start the current expansion project by mandating long-term planning for the trans-mission line and wind farm com-panies. These companies were previously one united corporation before the 1999 deregulation.

The bill introduced the con-cept of Competitive Renewable

Energy Zones, which designates eight areas around the state in which independent transmission companies can build their pow-er lines.

According to Roark, a large amount of the land for these zones will be acquired via emi-nent domain.

Roark said the current plan to expand the power-line system is an expensive one. Developers es-timate the project to cost more than $4.93 billion in the coming years, and they hope the new

grid can be fully functional by 2013, she said.

“Private transmission line com-panies are encouraged to build these lines because they will re-ceive a guaranteed rate of re-turn [from their services],” Sadler said.

While there is no current short-age of energy, the sizeable growth of Texas cities in the past decade has caused concern for analysts about the future because expand-ing the system is a long-term proj-ect, said Terry Hadley, a spokes-

man for the Public Utility Com-mission of Texas.

“There is enough energy now, but Texas is a rapidly growing state, so there will be a need for more energy in the future,” Had-ley said. “This plan [will be effec-tive] for the next 10, 20 or even 30 years.”

Hadley said between 5 and 10 percent of Texas energy is gener-ated from wind each day.

“This is a significant increase from 10 years ago, when it was only about 1 percent,” he said.

BILL: Spike in applicants contributes to long wait

NOISE: Ordinance affecting business of local venuesweekends and the restaurant also offers the T-shirts for sale.

Ryan Fulmer, general manag-er of Uncle Billy’s, said he discov-ered additional restrictions after he renewed the restaurant’s mu-sic permit in August. The new permit asks the restaurant to stop live music, no matter what sound level, by 8 p.m. Sundays through Thursdays. Live music is permit-ted until 10 p.m. Friday and Sat-urday, he said.

“There’s almost no point in having music on the weekdays,” Fulmer said. “We’ll have a res-taurant full of customers who ask if the band’s going to play more,

of if there’ll be a n o t h e r s e t . We have to tell them no, the city won’t let us.”

Fulmer said the new hours have been det-rimental to the musical atmo-sphere of Uncle Billy’s and that he has seen cus-tomers leave af-ter the music stops. He also said the most likely reason for the time restric-

tions was because of residents in nearby neighborhoods who called the police.

“This one guy calls every day to ask if we’re going to have live music just so he can call the police ahead of time,” Fulmer said. “It’s a nightmare.”

But a restaurant can apply to be re-classified as a cock-tail lounge to have live music play at the original 85 deci-bels. Rusty Zagst, the general manager

of Shady Grove, said his restaurant qualified for the classification and does not have the problems other restaurants face with the sound or-dinance.

Kimberly White-Erlinger of the Barton Hills Neighborhood Asso-ciation said in a Feb. 27 article in The Daily Texan that neighbor-hood associations were not trying to limit the music industry.

White-Erlinger said people who purchase a home or condo in Central Austin are generally aware of events that cause traf-fic and noise. The neighborhood associations only get involved when “it is clearly troublesome for the residents,” she said.

PANTRY: Project ‘humanizes’ less fortunate in eyes of volunteers

WIND: Population growth main cause of expansion

From page 1

From page 1

‘‘This one guy calls every day to ask if

we’re going to have live music just so he

can call the police ahead of time.

It’s a nightmare.”

— Ryan Fulmer general manager

of Uncle Billy’s

From page 1

From page 1

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AdvertisingDirector of Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jalah GoetteRetail Advertising Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brad CorbettAccount Executive/Broadcast Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carter GossCampus/National Sales Consultant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan BowermanAssistant to Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.J. SalgadoStudent Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kathryn AbbasStudent Advertising Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan FordAcct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Aldana, Anupama Kulkarni, Ashley Walker, Natasha Moonka

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Permanent StaffEditor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jillian SheridanManaging Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Stephen KellerAssociate Managing Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David R. Henry, Ana McKenzieAssociate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeremy Burchard, Dan Treadway, David Muto, Lauren WinchesterNews Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sean BeherecAssociate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pierre Bertrand, Austen Sofhauser, Blair WatlerSenior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Viviana Aldous, Bobby Longoria, Rachel Platis, Lena PriceEnterprise Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew KreighbaumEnterprise Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hudson LockettCopy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Robert GreenAssociate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cristina Herrera, Nausheen Jivani, Matt JonesDesign Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thu VoAssistant Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Shatha HusseinSenior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor Fausak, Lynda Gonzales, Olivia HintonPhoto Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May-Ying LamAssociate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bryant Haertlein, Peter Franklin, Caleb MillerSenior Photographers . . . .Karina Jacques, Mary Kang,Tamir Kalifa, Peyton McGee, Sara YoungLife&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leigh PattersonAssociate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Barry, Francisco Marin Jr.Senior Features Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Audrey Gale Campbell, Lisa HoLung, Ben Wermund Senior Entertainment Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robert Doty, Mary Lingwall, Robert RichSenior DT Weekend Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amber GenuskeSports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin TalbertSenior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Will Anderson, Wes DeVoe, Blake Hurtik. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dan Hurwitz, Laken Litman, Michael Sherfield, Chris TavarezComics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carolyn CalabreseWeb Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Annika ErdmanAssociate Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Erik ReynaMultimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Juan ElizondoAssociate Multimedia Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kara McKenzie, Rachel SchroederEditorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Richard Finnell

Issue StaffReporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Priscilla Pelli, Jim Pagels, Hannah Jones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Priscilla Totiyapungprasert, Audrey WhitePhotographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bruno Morlan, Lara Haase, Rachel TaylorSports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jordan Godwin, Tara Dreyer, Sameer BhucharLife&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gerald Rich, Emily RoyallCopy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Emily Chandler, Ashley Morgan, Dylan ClementPage Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Stacey Long, Amanda HicksComics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Claudine Lucena, Connor Shea, Monica Tseng, Emery Ferguson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ruohei Tatsu, Kathryn Menefee, Alex Diamond, Jeremy JohnsonEditorial Cartoonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael MurphyWire Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Micaela NeumannColumnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Douglas Leippold, Emily GrubertWeb Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nikki KimVideographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Blas Garcia, Jaemy Velazquez

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily except Saturday, Sunday, federal holidays

and exam periods, plus the last Saturday in July. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591) or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122).

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Entire contents copyright 2009 Texas Student Media.

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