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Prepared by SGL Consulting Group Australia Pty Ltd www.sglgroup.net Yarra Valley Aquatic and Leisure Facilities Feasibility Study and Business Case Final Report May 2014 AGENDA ITEM NO 7.3 ATTACHMENT 1 122
Transcript

Prepared by SGL Consulting Group Australia Pty Ltd

www.sglgroup.net

Yarra Valley Aquatic and

Leisure Facilities Feasibility Study and Business Case

Final Report

May 2014

AGENDA ITEM NO 7.3

ATTACHMENT 1

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(VIC 63.2011) Volume One – COGG IRFS – Key Findings and Recommendations - 24 July 2013 Commercial in confidence. SGL Group Consulting Pty Ltd www.sglgroup.net

2

SGL Consulting Group Australia Pty Ltd Adelaide 2a Mellor St West Beach SA 5024 Phone: +61 (08) 8235 0925 Fax: +61 (08) 8353 1067 Email: [email protected] Brisbane PO Box 713 Mount Gravatt Queensland 4122 Mobile: +61 (0) 416 235 235 Email: [email protected] Melbourne Level 6, 60 Albert Road South Melbourne VIC 3205 Phone: +61 (03) 9698 7300 Fax: +61 (03) 9698 7301 Email: [email protected] Perth 19 Clayton Street East Fremantle WA 6158 Phone: +61 (0) 8 9319-8991 Mobile: +61 (0) 407 901 636 Email: [email protected] Sydney 1/273 Alfred St Nth North Sydney NSW 2060 Mobile: +61 (04) 17 536 198 Email: [email protected]

SGL also has offices in: • Auckland • Christchurch • Wellington

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Table of Contents

Executive Summary .................................................................................................. i

1 Introduction ......................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Background ............................................................................................................. 1 1.2 Project Study Methodology .................................................................................... 1 1.3 Review of Shire of Yarra Ranges Aquatic Facilities Strategic Plan 2007 – 2017. 2 1.4 Recreation and Open Space Strategy .................................................................... 3

2 Demographic Review .......................................................................................... 1 2.1 Background ............................................................................................................. 1 2.2 Demographic Profile ............................................................................................... 1

2.2.1 Current Population Profile .................................................................................... 1 2.2.2 Other Socio-economic Statistics .......................................................................... 4

2.3 Population Change .................................................................................................. 5 2.4 Healesville Characteristics ..................................................................................... 5

2.4.1 Indigenous Population ......................................................................................... 6 2.5 Demographic Review Key Findings ....................................................................... 6 2.6 Yarra Ranges Health and Wellbeing Profile ........................................................... 7

2.6.1 National Health Performance Authority ................................................................ 7 2.6.2 Yarra Ranges Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2013 – 2017 ................................. 7 2.6.3 Relevance to Aquatic and Leisure Facilities ......................................................... 8

3 Healesville Aquatic Facilities Operational Review ........................................... 9 3.1 Healesville Outdoor Pool ........................................................................................ 9

3.1.1 Opening Hours .................................................................................................... 9 3.1.2 Usage Review ..................................................................................................... 9 3.1.3 Financial Review ............................................................................................... 10 3.1.4 Technical Review............................................................................................... 11 3.1.5 Life Saving Victoria – Aquatic Safety Assessment Safety Improvement Plan 2014 11

3.2 Healesville Indoor Pool ......................................................................................... 11 3.2.1 Opening Hours: ................................................................................................. 12 3.2.2 Usage Review ................................................................................................... 12 3.2.3 Financial Review ............................................................................................... 13 3.2.4 Replacement of the Indoor Pool ......................................................................... 15 3.2.5 Summary of Key Issues ..................................................................................... 15

4 Market Research and Consultation ................................................................. 16 4.1 Household Telephone Survey .............................................................................. 16 4.2 Respondent Profile ................................................................................................ 16

4.2.1 Current Use of Swimming Pools ........................................................................ 17 4.2.2 Regional Swimming Pool Participation Comparisons ......................................... 17 4.2.3 Pool User Profile Comparisons .......................................................................... 18 4.2.4 Reasons for Non-Use of Swimming Pools ......................................................... 18 4.2.5 Most Popular Swimming Pools .......................................................................... 19 4.2.6 Rating of Council's Swimming Pools .................................................................. 20 4.2.7 Poor Facility Rating Issues ................................................................................ 20 4.2.8 Swimming Pool Usage Profiles .......................................................................... 20 4.2.9 Future Use of Swimming Pools .......................................................................... 21 4.2.10 Facilities and Features that Would Encourage Greater Future Use of Pools ... 21

4.3 School Survey ....................................................................................................... 22 4.3.1 Use of Aquatic Centres ...................................................................................... 22 4.3.2 Schools Aquatic Program Coordination ............................................................. 22

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4.3.3 Frequency of Student Visitations in Learn to Swim Program .............................. 22 4.3.4 Most Popular Terms .......................................................................................... 22 4.3.5 Most Popular Swimming Pools .......................................................................... 23 4.3.6 Features Would Like to See Developed ............................................................. 23 4.3.7 School Based Aquatic Facilities ......................................................................... 23

4.4 Key Stakeholder Interviews .................................................................................. 23 4.5 Aquatic and Health and Fitness Facility Provision ............................................. 27

4.5.1 Aquatic and Health Aquatic and Health and Fitness Facility Provision ............... 29 4.5.2 Aquatic and Health Aquatic and Health and Fitness Facility Provision ............... 30

4.6 Aquatic and Leisure Facility Trends .................................................................... 31 4.6.1 Leisure and Aquatic Trends that Impact on Leisure Facilities ............................ 31 4.6.2 General Aquatic Facility Trends ......................................................................... 33 4.6.3 Specific Aquatic Facility Trends ......................................................................... 33 4.6.4 Potential Future Aquatic Facility Trends ............................................................. 36

5 Site Options and Assessment ......................................................................... 38 5.1 Site Criteria ............................................................................................................ 38

5.1.1 Primary Selection Criteria .................................................................................. 39 5.1.2 Secondary Selection Criteria ............................................................................. 39

5.2 Site Assessment .................................................................................................... 41 5.2.1 Summary of Key Findings .................................................................................. 42

6 Recommended Strategic Direction ................................................................. 43 6.1 Future Strategy Direction ...................................................................................... 43

6.1.1 Yarra Valley Aquatic Facilities Direction ............................................................. 44 6.1.2 Development Objectives and Principals ............................................................. 45 6.1.3 Why Should Council Provide Aquatic and Leisure Facilities? ............................. 46

6.2 Option One Master Plan ........................................................................................ 46 6.2.1 Option One - $26M - $30M ................................................................................ 52 6.2.2 Option Two - $20M ............................................................................................ 53 6.2.3 Option Three - $15M .......................................................................................... 54

7 Financial Operational Model ............................................................................ 55 7.1 Project Funding Strategy ...................................................................................... 55 7.2 Financial Models Global Impacts ......................................................................... 55 7.3 Facility Areas Covered in Business Model .......................................................... 55 7.4 Key Business and Operational Assumptions ...................................................... 56

7.4.1 Operating hours ................................................................................................. 56 7.4.2 Entry fees .......................................................................................................... 56 7.4.3 Management and Staffing Structure and Salary Rates ...................................... 57 7.4.4 Food and Beverage/Merchandising ................................................................... 57 7.4.5 Insurance ........................................................................................................... 57 7.4.6 Utilities ............................................................................................................... 57 7.4.7 Building and Plant Depreciation ......................................................................... 57 7.4.8 Capital Loan Repayments .................................................................................. 57

7.5 Global Impact Assumptions ................................................................................. 57 7.6 Usage projections ................................................................................................. 58 7.7 Financial Models ................................................................................................... 58

7.7.1 Base Case Financial Model ............................................................................... 59 7.8 Business Case Scenario Comparisons ............................................................... 59

7.8.1 Optimistic Case ................................................................................................. 59 7.8.2 Conservative Case ............................................................................................ 60 7.8.3 Facility Business Scenario Comparison ............................................................. 60 7.8.4 Financial Performance Summary ....................................................................... 61

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Directory of Tables TABLE 1.1 PROJECT METHODOLOGY ............................................................................................... 2 TABLE 2.1 AGE PROFILE ...................................................................................................................... 2 TABLE 2.2 COUNTRY OF BIRTH .......................................................................................................... 3 TABLE 2.3 AGE STRUCTURE ............................................................................................................... 6 TABLE 3.1 QUEENS PARK OUTDOOR POOL - FINANCIAL REVIEW SUMMARY 2006/2007 –

2013/2014 ....................................................................................................................................... 10 TABLE 3.2 USAGE BY TYPE COMPARISON ..................................................................................... 13 TABLE 3.3 HEALESVILLE INDOOR POOL - FINANCIAL REVIEW SUMMARY 2009 -2011 ............. 13 TABLE 3.4 HEALESVILLE INDOOR POOL – OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE REVIEW 2006/2007

– 2010/2011 .................................................................................................................................... 14 TABLE 4.1 RESIDENT TELEPHONE SURVEY RESPONDENT SAMPLE ......................................... 16 TABLE 4.2 WESTERN REGION USAGE COMPARISONS POOL USAGE TRENDS 2000 TO 2010 17 TABLE 4.3 SOUTH-EASTERN METRO REGION POOL USAGE TRENDS 2000 TO 2010 ............... 18 TABLE 4.4 USAGE OF SWIMMING POOL VARIANCES AGAINST SAMPLE AVERAGE ................. 18 TABLE 4.5 REASONS FOR NON-USE OF SWIMMING POOLS ........................................................ 19 TABLE 4.6 MOST POPULAR AND USED SWIMMING POOLS .......................................................... 19 TABLE 4.7 KEY STAKEHOLDER INTERVIEWS ................................................................................. 24 TABLE 4.8 AQUATICS AND RECREATION VICTORIA: INDOOR AQUATIC & RECREATION

FACILITY DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES ..................................................................................... 28 TABLE 5.1 SITE ASSESSMENT SCORE SHEET ............................................................................... 41 TABLE 6.1 OPTION COMPONENT COMPARISON ............................................................................ 48 TABLE 6.2 OPTION COMPONENT AREA COMPARISON ................................................................. 48 TABLE 6.3 PROPOSED YARRA RANGES AQUATIC AND LEISURE CENTRE COMPONENT

SCHEDULE .................................................................................................................................... 49 TABLE 7.1 PROPOSED YARRA RANGES AQUATIC AND LEISURE CENTRE PROPOSED YEAR

ONE ENTRY FEES (2016/2017) .................................................................................................... 56 TABLE 7.2 BASE CASE 10 YEAR OPERATIONAL BUSINESS PROJECTIONS ............................... 59 TABLE 7.3 OPTIMISTIC CASE 10 YEAR OPERATIONAL BUSINESS PROJECTIONS – 10% MORE

USE ................................................................................................................................................ 59 TABLE 7.4 CONSERVATIVE CASE 10 YEAR OPERATIONAL BUSINESS PROJECTIONS – 10%

LESS USE ...................................................................................................................................... 60 TABLE 7.5 FACILITY BUSINESS SCENARIO COMPARISON ........................................................... 61

Appendices APPENDIX ONE: SITE ASSESSMENT APPENDIX TWO: QUANTITY SURVEYORS REPORT APPENDIX THREE: KEY STAKEHOLDERS APPENDIX FOUR: BASE CASE FINANCIAL MODEL

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Executive Summary

Introduction

The Yarra Ranges Shire wished to undertake a feasibility study and business case for the Yarra Valley Aquatic and Leisure Facilities. In 2007, Council undertook the development of the Aquatic Facilities Strategic Plan. The Plan involved a review of the demand, use and condition of aquatic facilities within the Yarra Ranges. The strategy outlined a prioritised 10 year development plan for the facilities. The Plan recommended that the Shire be divided into four districts and service initiatives be developed to ensure that there was an equitable mix of aquatic facilities in each district. Specifically for the Yarra Valley District, the Plan recommended the need to identify priorities for upgrade and enhancement works regarding the current aquatic facilities in Healesville. The Plan further recommended consideration of options for a new or redeveloped aquatic facility in Healesville based on further planning and advice regarding further technical and usage information. The purpose of this study is to undertake a feasibility study and business case analysis for the Yarra Valley Region Aquatic and Leisure Facilities (Healesville) and develop future options including:

Identifying possible upgrade or enhancement works regarding the current aquatic facilities in Healesville.

Consideration of options for a new or redeveloped aquatic facility in Healesville based on further planning and advice regarding further technical and usage information

Demographic Summary The Yarra Valley includes the localities of Yarra Glen, Badger Creek, Chum Creek, Fernshaw, Healesville, Mount Toolebewong and Toolangi (part). Part of the locality of Toolangi is located in Murrindindi Shire. The population is currently estimated at 9,635 people and covers an area of almost 291 square kilometres. Analysis of the five year age groups of Healesville and the Yarra Valley area in 2011 compared to Yarra Ranges Council area shows that there was a similar proportion of people in the younger age groups (under 15) and a higher proportion of people in the older age groups (65+). Overall, 19.6% of the population was aged between 0 and 15, and 16.4% were aged 65 years and over, compared with 20.0% and 12.5% respectively for Yarra Ranges Council area.

The Yarra Valley has a significant indigenous population. The highest concentration is in Badger Creek. At the 2011 census, there were 269 persons living within postal area 3777 that identified as being either Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. This represented 2.6% of the Yarra Valley population. This is significantly higher than the proportion of the Victorian population that is indigenous, which in 2011 was 0.7%.

Health and Wellbeing Profile

The proposed development of the Yarra Valley Aquatic and Leisure Centre supports the key health and engagement objectives identified as priorities within Council strategic documents. It is anticipated that the Centre would provide services and programs to address some of the following key health and well-being issues identified through the health and Wellbeing Strategy:

Hi level of deaths related to diabetes in the area.

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A high range of mental health issues, particularly affecting the disadvantaged communities

An above average level of overweight or obesity

A high level of inactivity with 26% or residents not meeting minimum guidelines for physical activity.

An ageing population with one of the highest level of older residents living in Healesville/Yarra Glen

Long commuting times to work and an above average level of residents with time pressures or who lacked time for friends and family.

Pockets of high unemployment (Upper Yarra Corridor)1

Current Facility Provision There are currently two aquatic facilities located in the Healesville area including the Healesville Outdoor Pool located in Queens Park and the Jack Hort Memorial Pool located at the Healesville High School, Cameron’s Road, Healesville. The review of the current facilities indicates:

The facilities are at the end of their useful life. The facilities have aged and no longer meet current facility standards and community expectations.

The technical review of the outdoor pool indicates that significant work is required to upgrade the plant and pipe work. The cost of these works at the time of the review was estimated at $1.5M.

Considerable work to the plant and equipment is also required at the indoor pool however the school does not have the capacity to fund these works

The indoor facility is operating at a deficit, which the school is no longer prepared to fund. Council has recently approved funding to meet the operating deficit for 2014.

The usage review of the outdoor pool indicates that visitations are remaining relatively constant at an average of 6,500 visits per year. It should be noted that outdoor seasonal pools are impacted by weather conditions by between 25% to 30%.

Future Strategy Directions The market research and consultation findings indicate that the current aquatic facilities are at the end of their useful life. There is a need to develop a new integrated aquatic and leisure centre that is centrally located to meet current and future community expectation and need. The Vision for the Centre is to: Create a vibrant and attractive high quality aquatic and leisure Centre and community hub that provides spaces for people to enjoy and participate in active and passive recreation, community learning, well-being, recreation and socialising. The site reviews undertake as part of the project have identified that the Queens Park site or the Lilydale Road site were the best locations for further investigation as part of the concept plan development. The consultation processes has identified the opportunity to create a sporting, leisure and aquatic precinct that caters for a range of diverse indoor and outdoor activities and opportunities using both the adjacent sporting fields at Queens Park or the Railway and play space at Lilydale Road and a newly developed aquatic and leisure facility. These trends along with the key consultation findings indicate the need to ensure the development of a facility that:

1 Yarra Ranges Health and Wellbeing Profile: Indicators of health and wellbeing in Yarra Ranges

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Provides for a range of formal and programmable water to support lap and fitness swimming, school programs and carnivals and local swimming clubs training and competition.

Encourages greater family/child entries by providing a range of indoor and outdoor leisure water, play and fun water features and some interactive water.

Provides a range of dry health and wellness facilities including the gymnasium and multipurpose program rooms to enable the health and fitness market to continue to increase and assist with improving the financial viability of the Centre. This should include the development of health suits for allied health professions such as massage therapists, physiotherapists and nutritionists to support the primary use of the aquatic and health and fitness programs. Discussions with the local Community Health Services indicate that are in support of decentralised programs operating potentially from an integrated centre.

Develops additional flexible aquatic programming opportunities through the development of a new dedicated program pool capable of servicing the aquatic education programs and warm water therapy based programs and services to meet the needs of the young and ageing population.

Develop a range of group change room facilities and family/disabled change rooms off the pool deck and a separate school change areas to improve the customer comfort and access to change facilities.

Provide an efficient front of house/reception area and staff amenities to support operational efficiencies and customer service.

Develop a multipurpose/training/ education/birthday party room that can service a range of community groups and organisations.

Considers opportunities to integrate the environmental characteristics of the area and celebrates the heritage of the site as a “meeting place”. This could include the interpretation aspects built into the entire design of the facility and education about the environmental imperatives of the site.

Develop car parking to cater for both the current and future increased usage of the Centre.

Development Objectives and Principals

Council’s objectives in connection with developing the Aquatic and Leisure Centre are to:

Provide significant leisure opportunities to meet the current and future needs and expectations of residents, meeting both the recreational and training needs of swimmers, and fitness participants as well as encouraging aspiring swimmers to take part.

Ensuring a quality Centre that will create opportunities for young people, women and people with special needs to become more active participants.

Provide opportunities to contribute to the health and well-being of Yarra Ranges residents and visitors.

To provide for and encourage both water related and non-water related leisure and fitness activities for various ages, skill levels and abilities.

To encourage and foster community participation in the planning, development, management and evaluation of Centre programs and services.

To provide a broad range of recreational opportunities for residents of all ages by meeting changing community needs.

To provide opportunities for families to participate in leisure activities together.

To ensure the facility is maintained as an attractive Centre in good working order (including the grounds).

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To ensure the Centre co-operates with Council’s other recreational facilities, local business and the community to promote the interest of Council.

Through participation in leisure activities a greater sense of community consecutiveness amongst the residents of Yarra Ranges will develop.

Development Options

Based on the extensive market research and consultation a master plan for the proposed Yarra Valley Aquatic and Leisure Centre was developed. A review of the master plan capital cost report indicated that it was significantly higher than anticipated. As a result the Project Team revised the facility scope to provide two further options for consideration. The following provides a summary of the three options developed. Master Plan Development option 1 ($30M)

This option is the ideal. It considers the full range of site issues, provides a desirable level of service that meets community demand and offers a high quality facility with premium design. This option includes an integrated kindergarten and childcare area. Development option 2 ($20M) This options provides a reduced level of service, however maintains the functionality that meets community demand. The facility offers a quality facility with basic design. This option does not include the kindergarten and childcare area but does include a crèche to service the centre. Development option 3 ($15M)

This option offers a further reduced level of service and prioritises facility components to those for family/ social recreation and health. This results in a facility without a 25m pool, a reduced leisure pool and warm water program pool with a very basic design. This option does not include the kindergarten, childcare or crèche.

The following table provides a comparison summary of the components provided within each of the options.

Option Component Comparison Facility Components Option 1 Master

Plan Option Two Option Three

Formal Pool 25 metre pool

Reduced by 2 lanes to 6 lanes Deleted

Program Pool

Reduced by 10m²

Leisure Pool

Reduced by 39m²

Reduced by 37m²

Spectator seating Deleted

Weights room

Reduced by 59m²

Reduced by 35m²

Group fitness

Reduced by 127m²

Reduced by 132m²

Health & Fitness Change

Reduced by 81m²

Reduced by 89m²

Upper deck Deleted Deleted

Kindergarten/Childcare Deleted Deleted

Crèche Increased by 24m²

Deleted

Consulting suites

Reduced by 102m²

Reduced by 102m²

First Aid

Reduced by 3m²

Reduced by 2m²

Sauna Deleted Deleted

Group change rooms Deleted Deleted

Family change rooms Increased by 16m²

Reduced by 20m²

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Financial Model

A detailed financial model for Option Two has been developed to understand the anticipated usage, income, expenditure and operational performance of the proposed new facility. The following table provides a summary of the Business scenario facility comparisons and indicates the following ranges of operational performance based on:

10% more use

Base Case – Average predicted use

10% less use

Facility Business Scenario Comparison CATEGORY Scenario Comparisons Scenario Comparisons Scenario Comparisons

Optimistic Case 10% More Use Average Net Profit/(Loss)

Over 10 years

Base Case (Average Use) Average Net Profit/(Loss)

Over 10 years

Conservative Case 10% Less Use Average Net Profit/(Loss)

Over 10 years

Average Income $2.611 $2.388 $2.165

Average Expenditure $2.509 $2.493 $2.477

Long Term Maintenance Allowance (every 5 years)

$70 $70 $70

Average Operating Surplus

$32 ($175) ($381)

329,000

Visits 305,000 visits

281,000 visits

The financial performance summary indicates that:

Revenue is expected to range from an average of approximately $2.156M to $2.611M.

Expenditure is expected to range from an average of approximately $2.509M to $2.477M.

The Centre is expected to operate between a deficit or approximately $381,000 per annum through to an operational surplus of approximately $32,000 per annum. This will be determined by the management structure and programming of the facility.

The Centre will attract between 280,000 visits and 330,000 visits per annum. This will again be impacted by the type and level of programming offered.

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1.1 Background

The Yarra Ranges Shire wished to undertake a feasibility study and business case for the Yarra Valley Aquatic and Leisure Facilities. In 2007, Council undertook the development of the Aquatic Facilities Strategic Plan. The Plan involved a review of the demand, use and condition of aquatic facilities within the Yarra Ranges. The strategy outlined a prioritised 10 year development plan for the facilities. The Plan recommended that the Shire be divided into four districts and service initiatives be developed to ensure that there was an equitable mix of aquatic facilities in each district. The four districts were:

Upper Yarra – currently serviced by the Yarra Junction and Seville aquatic facilities.

Yarra Valley – currently serviced by the indoor and outdoor pools in Healesville.

The Hills – currently serviced by the Belgrave, Monbulk and Olinda aquatic facilities.

Urban – currently serviced by the Lilydale Outdoor Pool and the Kilsyth Centenary Pool.

The Plan further recommended that any development or redevelopment of the aquatic facilities should focus on:

Consolidating provision in each precinct.

Diversifying the leisure activities within aquatic centres.

Providing a greater range of programs and activities at each venue.

Strengthening the presentation, positioning and access to each venue.

Specifically for the Yarra Valley District, the Plan recommends the need to identify priorities for upgrade and enhancement works regarding the current aquatic facilities in Healesville. The Plan further recommends consideration of options for a new or redeveloped aquatic facility in Healesville based on further planning and advice regarding further technical and usage information. The purpose of this study is to undertake a feasibility study and business case analysis for the Yarra Valley Region Aquatic and Leisure Facilities (Healesville) and develop future options including:

Identifying possible upgrade or enhancement works regarding the current aquatic facilities in Healesville.

Consideration of options for a new or redeveloped aquatic facility in Healesville based on further planning and advice regarding further technical and usage information

1.2 Project Study Methodology

SGL Consulting Group Australia Pty Ltd (here after referred to as SGL Group) was appointed to work in collaboration with Council and the community to complete the project. The project methodology was developed under four interrelated stages.

1 Introduction

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Table 1.1 Project Methodology

PHASE ONE: NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND ANALYSIS

Task 1: Project Clarification

Task 2: Review of Previous Research

Task 3: Operational Review

Task 4: Demographic Review

Task 5: Review of competitor

Task 6: Key stakeholder interviews

Task 8: Resident Survey

Task 9: School Survey

Task 10: Industry Trend Review

Task 11: Written Submissions

Task 12: Issues and Opportunities Report

PHASE TWO: FACILITY DEVELOPMENT OPTIONS

Task 13: Development of Facility Component Schedule

Task 14: Concept Options

Task 15: Indicative Capital Cost

Task 16: Business Case

Task 17: Funding Options Review

Task 18: Draft Report

Task 19: Final Report

1.3 Review of Shire of Yarra Ranges Aquatic Facilities Strategic Plan 2007 – 2017

In 2013 Council undertook a review of the 2007 – 2017 Aquatic Facilities Strategic Plan and to identify the purpose and way forward for these facilities into the future. The review paper is structured as follows:

Part 1

Introduction to the current strategic plan

Summary of the background research papers that led to the development of the current strategy

Summary of the strategic and specific actions to be implemented

An outline of the work that has been undertaken by Council to date to implement the strategy

Identification of shortfalls in the strategy

Part 2 The paper then commences an analysis of the industry in 2013. Identifying the changes in thinking that have occurred since the adoption of the strategic plan in 2007. This section of paper addresses:

Facility Trends

Participation data

Facility Development Guidelines

Performance Management

Key industry partners

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Part 3 This is followed by analysis of Yarra Ranges Health and Well-being. This information forms the basis of why Council provides facilities.

Part 4 The final section of the report begins to consider the way forward for these facilities. It addresses:

Sustainable provision

A Regional Approach

The proposed way forward for the project.

The review has identified that Local Government has begun to discuss a more regional approach with a range of Council services. It is recognised that there are a number of benefits to this ranging from financial to community. The eastern region councils have secured funding from Sport and Recreation Victoria for a grant to look at a regional approach for the provision of a range of regional recreation facilities. Discussions to date have focused on aquatic and leisure facilities and sports including soccer, netball, Australian Rules football, tennis, basketball, athletics and gymnastics, with the recognition that these facilities are large, capital intensive projects. Aquatic and leisure facilities are one of the most significant capital expenditure items undertaken by Council’s. With the improved knowledge on catchment’s required to support these facilities and a much better appreciation of how community access these facilities there is an overwhelming argument to support the development of a regional approach for the future provision of aquatic and leisure facilities.

1.4 Recreation and Open Space Strategy

The Recreation and Open Space Strategy was adopted in 2013. The overarching strategy consolidates all recreation strategies under one umbrella document. It also includes a planning framework that supports a regional response to providing major aquatic and recreation facilities in Yarra Ranges

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2.1 Background

Yarra Ranges Council is located on metropolitan Melbourne's eastern fringe- between 30 and 110 kilometres east of the Melbourne CBD. Yarra Ranges Council is bounded by Murrindindi Shire in the north, Mansfield Shire in the east, Baw Baw and Cardinia Shires and the City of Casey in the south and the City of Knox, Maroondah and Manningham Cities and Nillumbik Shire in the west. The population is currently estimated at 147,328 people and covers an area of almost 2,500 square kilometres. The Yarra Ranges is the seventh largest local government area in Melbourne in terms of population size and the eighth largest in the state of Victoria. The municipality balances a mixture of urban and rural communities. Around 70% of the population live in the ‘urban’ areas of the municipality that represents approximately 3% of its landmass. The remaining population is distributed throughout the remaining area. There are over 55 suburbs, townships, small communities and rural areas within Yarra Ranges, making it one of the most diverse of any municipality in the State. Yarra Ranges can be characterised as a ‘young’ Council with a higher than average proportion of the population aged between 5-17 years. The dispersion of the communities significantly impacts on the cost of infrastructure and service provision, particularly to the more rural areas of the municipality. The diversity of needs within the Yarra Ranges is significantly different to that experienced by other metropolitan councils. There are approximately 6,750 businesses in the Yarra Ranges employing over 33,107 people. Economic activity in the municipality is based on tourism, manufacturing industries (in the metropolitan suburbs) and rural industries – particularly agriculture (including horticulture, floriculture and viticulture).

2.2 Demographic Profile

The following section summarises the key population, demographic characteristics and trends likely to impact future participation in sport and recreation activities in the area. The population and demographic profiles are based wherever possible on the 2011 ABS Census data.

2.2.1 Current Population Profile

The 2011 ABS Census data shows that the Yarra Ranges Council had a population of 144,531 persons in 2011 compared to 140,215 persons in 2006.

2 Demographic Review

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i. Age Profile

The Yarra Ranges area age profile for residents of the total municipality is summarised in Table 2.1: Table 2.1 Age Profile

Five year age groups (years)

2011 2006 Change

Number % Greater Melbourne

Number % Greater Melbourne

2006 to 2011

0 to 4 9,384 6.5 6.5 9,038 6.4 6.3 +346

5 to 9 9,406 6.5 6.0 9,978 7.1 6.3 -572

10 to 14 10,061 7.0 5.9 10,933 7.8 6.4 -872

15 to 19 10,465 7.2 6.3 10,953 7.8 6.7 -488

20 to 24 9,234 6.4 7.5 8,447 6.0 7.4 +787

25 to 29 7,920 5.5 7.9 7,314 5.2 7.1 +606

30 to 34 8,336 5.8 7.5 9,096 6.5 7.7 -760

35 to 39 10,024 6.9 7.5 10,501 7.5 7.9 -477

40 to 44 10,912 7.5 7.5 11,138 7.9 7.5 -226

45 to 49 10,972 7.6 6.9 11,178 8.0 7.2 -206

50 to 54 10,864 7.5 6.4 10,259 7.3 6.4 +605

55 to 59 9,761 6.8 5.6 9,749 7.0 5.9 +12

60 to 64 9,195 6.4 5.1 6,993 5.0 4.5 +2,202

65 to 69 6,494 4.5 3.9 4,702 3.4 3.6 +1,792

70 to 74 4,332 3.0 3.0 3,369 2.4 3.0 +963

75 to 79 2,901 2.0 2.4 2,913 2.1 2.6 -12

80 to 84 2,305 1.6 2.0 2,029 1.4 2.0 +276

85 and over 1,965 1.4 1.8 1,625 1.2 1.6 +340

Total 144,531 100.0 100.0 140,215 100.0 100.0 +4,316

Analysis of the five year age groups of Yarra Ranges Council area in 2011 compared to Greater Melbourne shows that there was a higher proportion of people in the younger age groups (under 15) and a lower proportion of people in the older age groups (65+).

Overall, 20.0% of the population was aged between 0 and 15, and 12.5% were aged 65 years and over, compared with 18.5% and 13.1% respectively for Greater Melbourne.

The major differences between the age structure of Yarra Ranges Council area and Greater Melbourne were:

A larger percentage of persons aged 60 to 64 (6.4% compared to 5.1%)

A larger percentage of persons aged 55 to 59 (6.8% compared to 5.6%)

A larger percentage of persons aged 50 to 54 (7.5% compared to 6.4%)

A larger percentage of persons aged 10 to 14 (7.0% compared to 5.9%)

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From 2006 to 2011, Yarra Ranges Council area's population increased by 4,316 people (3.1%). This represents an average annual population change of 0.61% per year over the period.

The largest changes in age structure in this area between 2006 and 2011 were in the age groups:

60 to 64 (+2,202 persons)

65 to 69 (+1,792 persons)

70 to 74 (+963 persons)

10 to 14 (-872 persons)

i. Birthplace

Seven per cent of people in Yarra Ranges Council area come from countries where English is not the first language.

Country of Birth data identifies where people were born and is indicative of the level of cultural diversity in Yarra Ranges Council area. The mix of Country of Birth groups is also indicative of historical settlement patterns, as source countries for Australia's immigration program have varied significantly over time. Table 2.2 shows the country of birth of Yarra Ranges Residents and the difference between 2001 and 2006. Table 2.2 Country of Birth

Yarra Ranges Council area

2011 2006 Change

Country of birth Number % Greater Melbourne

Number % Greater Melbourne

2006 to 2011

United Kingdom 10,101 7.0 4.1 10,381 7.4 4.4 -280

Netherlands 1,767 1.2 0.3 1,957 1.4 0.4 -190

New Zealand 1,725 1.2 1.7 1,590 1.1 1.5 +135

Germany 1,228 0.8 0.5 1,265 0.9 0.6 -37

Italy 1,021 0.7 1.7 1,099 0.8 2.0 -78

South Africa 694 0.5 0.5 535 0.4 0.5 +159

India 484 0.3 2.7 317 0.2 1.4 +167

United States of America

477 0.3 0.4 427 0.3 0.3 +50

China 372 0.3 2.3 215 0.2 1.5 +157

Philippines 368 0.3 0.8 274 0.2 0.7 +94

Ireland 366 0.3 0.3 351 0.3 0.3 +15

Poland 282 0.2 0.4 262 0.2 0.4 +20

Burma (Myanmar) 234 0.2 0.1 58 0.0 0.0 +176

Sri Lanka 229 0.2 1.1 215 0.2 0.8 +14

Canada 227 0.2 0.2 202 0.1 0.1 +25

Malaysia 225 0.2 1.0 156 0.1 0.8 +69

Austria 161 0.1 0.1 187 0.1 0.1 -26

Greece 147 0.1 1.2 188 0.1 1.4 -41 Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing 2011, 2006. Analysis of the country of birth of the population in Yarra Ranges Council area in 2011 compared to Greater Melbourne shows that there was a smaller proportion of people born overseas, as well as a smaller proportion of people from a non-English speaking background.

Overall, 16.3% of the population was born overseas, and 6.9% were from a non-English speaking background, compared with 31.4% and 24.2% respectively for Greater Melbourne.

The largest non-English speaking country of birth in Yarra Ranges Council area was Netherlands, where 1.2% of the population, or 1,767 people, were born.

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The major differences between the countries of birth of the population in Yarra Ranges Council area and Greater Melbourne were:

A larger percentage of people born in United Kingdom (7.0% compared to 4.1%)

A smaller percentage of people born in India (0.3% compared to 2.7%)

A smaller percentage of people born in China (0.3% compared to 2.3%)

A smaller percentage of people born in Greece (0.1% compared to 1.2%)

ii. Emerging groups

Between 2006 and 2011, the number of people born overseas increased by 825 or 3.6%, and the number of people from a non-English speaking background increased by 721 or 7.7%.

The largest changes in birthplace countries of the population in this area between 2006 and 2011 were for those born in:

United Kingdom (-280 persons)

Netherlands (-190 persons)

Burma (Myanmar) (+176 persons)

India (+167 persons)

2.2.2 Other Socio-economic Statistics The ABS indicates the following relevant statistical trends on education, housing, income, employment and families.

i. Education

In 2011, 36.3% of the population held educational qualifications, and 53.5% (56,196 people) had no qualifications, compared with 36.4% and 52.1% respectively for the Melbourne Statistical Division.

The major differences between the qualifications held by the population in Yarra Ranges Council and the Melbourne Statistical Division were:

o A larger percentage of people with Vocational qualifications (19.5% compared to 13.8%),

o A smaller percentage of people with Bachelor or Higher degrees (9.0% compared to 14.2%).

ii. Housing

Analysis of the housing tenure of the population of the Yarra Ranges municipality in 2011 compared to the Melbourne Statistical Division shows that there was a similar proportion of households who owned their dwelling; a larger proportion purchasing their dwelling; and a smaller proportion who were renters.

Overall, 33.3% of the population owned their dwelling; 46.9% were purchasing, and 13.6% were

renting, compared with 33.1%, 34.6% and 24.5% respectively for the Melbourne Statistical Division.

Analysis of the monthly housing loan repayments of households in Yarra Ranges compared to the Melbourne Statistical Division shows that there was a smaller proportion of householders paying high mortgage repayments ($2,000 per month or more) but a larger proportion of households with low mortgage repayments (less than $950 per month).

Overall, 12.4% of households were paying high mortgage repayments, and 29.9% were paying low repayments, compared with 20.8% and 24.3% respectively in the Melbourne Statistical Division.

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i. Income

Analysis of household income levels in Yarra Ranges in 2011 compared to the Melbourne Statistical Division shows that there was a smaller proportion of high-income households (those earning $1,700 per week or more).

There are a smaller proportion of low-income households (those earning less than $500 per week).

Overall, 21.3% of the households earned a high income, and 15.4% were low-income households, compared with 21.8% and 19.5% respectively for the Melbourne Statistical Division.

2.3 Population Change

Yarra Ranges is expected to experience slow but steady population increase for the next thirty years. However, the total number of households will increase quite strongly, particularly through to the 2020’s. This increase in households will be driven by the decline in household size – a result of children leaving the home in established households, and the new households being formed averaging fewer children of their own. Ageing in Yarra Ranges will relate mainly to the large increases in people aged over 60. The total population is expected to increase by 543 people in 2013 to 149,320 and by a further 13,755

people to 163,075 in 203. This represents and increase Average annual percentage change of

0.49% between 2013 and 2031 (18 years) and a total percentage change of 9.21%.

2.4 Healesville Characteristics

The Yarra Valley includes the localities of Badger Creek, Chum Creek, Fernshaw, Healesville, Mount Toolebewong and Toolangi (part). Part of the locality of Toolangi is located in Murrindindi Shire. The Yarra Valley is bounded by Murrindindi Shire in the north, the localities of East Warburton and Warburton in the east, the localities of Wesburn, Don Valley, Launching Place and Woori Yallock in the south and the Yarra River, the locality of Tarrawarra, Old Healesville Road, School House Ridge and the locality of Dixons Creek in the west. The area is a predominantly rural area, with substantial residential, commercial and industrial areas in the township of Healesville, and a small township at Badger Creek. The population is currently estimated at 9,635 people and covers an area of almost 291 square kilometres.

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The age profile of Healesville is detailed in the table below.

Table 2.3 Age Structure

Healesville and the Yarra Valley area

2011 2006 Change

Five year age groups (years)

Number % Yarra Ranges Council area

Number % Yarra Ranges Council area

2006 to 2011

0 to 4 646 6.7 6.5 575 6.2 6.4 +71

5 to 9 621 6.4 6.5 623 6.8 7.1 -2

10 to 14 623 6.5 7.0 712 7.7 7.8 -89

15 to 19 587 6.1 7.2 667 7.2 7.8 -80

20 to 24 510 5.3 6.4 450 4.9 6.0 +59

25 to 29 426 4.4 5.5 414 4.5 5.2 +11

30 to 34 554 5.8 5.8 547 5.9 6.5 +7

35 to 39 620 6.4 6.9 601 6.5 7.5 +19

40 to 44 663 6.9 7.5 735 8.0 7.9 -72

45 to 49 755 7.8 7.6 740 8.0 8.0 +15

50 to 54 751 7.8 7.5 662 7.2 7.3 +89

55 to 59 657 6.8 6.8 643 7.0 7.0 +14

60 to 64 635 6.6 6.4 523 5.7 5.0 +112

65 to 69 552 5.7 4.5 400 4.3 3.4 +153

70 to 74 369 3.8 3.0 304 3.3 2.4 +65

75 to 79 275 2.9 2.0 313 3.4 2.1 -38

80 to 84 236 2.5 1.6 150 1.6 1.4 +86

85 and over 147 1.5 1.4 163 1.8 1.2 -16

Total 9,634 100.0 100.0 9,230 100.0 100.0 +405

Analysis of the five year age groups of Healesville and the Yarra Valley area in 2011 compared to Yarra Ranges Council area shows that there was a similar proportion of people in the younger age groups (under 15) and a higher proportion of people in the older age groups (65+).

Overall, 19.6% of the population was aged between 0 and 15, and 16.4% were aged 65 years and over, compared with 20.0% and 12.5% respectively for Yarra Ranges Council area.

The major differences between the age structure of Healesville and the Yarra Valley area and Yarra Ranges Council area were:

A larger percentage of persons aged 65 to 69 (5.7% compared to 4.5%)

A larger percentage of persons aged 80 to 84 (2.5% compared to 1.6%)

A larger percentage of persons aged 75 to 79 (2.9% compared to 2.0%)

A larger percentage of persons aged 70 to 74 (3.8% compared to 3.0%)

From 2006 to 2011, Healesville and the Yarra Valley areas population increased by 404 people (4.4%). This represents an average annual population change of 0.86% per year over the period. The largest changes in age structure in this area between 2006 and 2011 were in the age groups:

65 to 69 (+153 persons)

60 to 64 (+112 persons)

50 to 54 (+89 persons)

10 to 14 (-89 persons)

2.4.1 Indigenous Population

Yarra Valley has a significant indigenous population. The highest concentration is in Badger Creek.

At the 2011 census, there were 269 persons living within postal area 3777 that identified as being either Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. This represented 2.6% of the Yarra Valley Healesville population. This is significantly higher than the proportion of the Victorian population that is indigenous, which in 2011 was 0.7%.

2.5 Demographic Review Key Findings

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Young people are key users of aquatic and leisure facilities. In Yarra Ranges, the number of young people 0 – 24 will decline over the next 14 years from 36.9% to 29.4% however they will still represent almost a third of the population in their most active years demonstrating a continued need for high quality active and passive recreation opportunities.

The municipality will experience slow but steady population growth for the next thirty years.

Yarra Ranges is less multicultural than most of Melbourne with 16.2% of the population born overseas, and 6.7% from a non-English speaking background. This can be compared to 29.0% and 22.0% respectively for the Melbourne Statistical Division. But Healesville does have a high level of Indigenous residents.

The dominant non-English speaking country of birth in Yarra Ranges is Netherlands.

2.6 Yarra Ranges Health and Wellbeing Profile

The Yarra Ranges Health and Wellbeing Profile was developed to provide an evidence base to support the development of the Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan 2013 – 2017. It is a comprehensive document.

2.6.1 National Health Performance Authority

The National Health Performance Authority is an independent agency that monitors and reports on the performance of local health care organisations including Local Hospital Networks, public and private hospitals, and primary health care organisations that provide health care services to the community. The Authority was established under the National Health Reform Act 2011 and is a prescribed agency under the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997.

2

The National Health Performance Authority, in October 2013, identified that the obesity rate for residents in the Eastern Suburbs of Melbourne which includes Yarra Ranges was 25% with a further 32% identified as overweight.(180,000 people in total) It also identified that 17% of this population smokes. (54,000 people).

2.6.2 Yarra Ranges Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2013 – 2017

Council’s approach to promoting good health is described in the Health and Wellbeing Strategy. The Strategy looks at what makes for good health and wellbeing, including a place where people can age well and the environments that influence this: the social, built, economic and natural environments. The Strategy is developed in accordance with the Victorian Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008 which requires Council to: “Protect, improve and promote public health and wellbeing of the people of the municipality.” The Act directs Councils to take account of health data for the municipal district, identify goals and strategies to support maximum health, involve the community in the development, implementation and evaluation of the Strategy and identify partnerships that will help achieve the goals. The Strategy takes an evidence based position that unequal access to the determinants of health, such as income, education and housing, are largely beyond individual control.

Priority: Healthy Place, Healthy People

The strategy identifies as one of it key goals the need to engage the community and increase participation in physical activity. It further states that physical activity is ranked only second in importance to tobacco control as the most important factor in promoting good health and preventing disease in Australia. It notes that there are certain groups less likely to participate in physical activity including women, aboriginal people, older adults, people born overseas or those that have lower economic status or have a disability. (VicHealth Participation in physical activity: Research summary) To increase physical activity for everybody in Yarra Ranges the strategy identifies, in part, that

2 www.nhpa.gov.au

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We will increase access to recreation and sporting activities for all, including through active recreation facilities including pools, ovals, community programs and participation in community events.

We will increase participation in physical activity for those who may experience barriers including women and girls, people with disabilities, people living on lover incomes, indigenous residents and our ageing population.

3

2.6.3 Relevance to Aquatic and Leisure Facilities

The proposed development of the Yarra Valley Aquatic and Leisure Centre supports the key health and engagement objectives identified as priorities within the above Council strategic documents. The proposed Centre would provide a range of structured and unstructured recreation opportunities providing residents with access to programs and services that support and encourage a more active and healthy life style. The Centre would continue to provide a “meeting place” for residents of all ages and abilities to congregate and socialise in a safe and supportive environment. The Centre would provide services and programs to address some of the following key health and well-being issues identified through the health and Wellbeing Strategy:

Hi level of deaths related to diabetes in the area.

A high range of mental health issues, particularly affecting the disadvantaged communities

An above average level of overweight or obesity

A high level of inactivity with 26% or residents not meeting minimum guidelines for physical activity.

An ageing population with one of the highest level of older residents living in Healesville/Yarra Glen

Long commuting times to work and an above average level of residents with time pressures or who lacked time for friends and family.

Pockets of high unemployment (Upper Yarra Corridor)4

3 Yarra Ranges Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2013 - 2017

4 Yarra Ranges Health and Wellbeing Profile: Indicators of health and wellbeing in Yarra Ranges

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There are currently two aquatic facilities located in the Healesville area including the Healesville Outdoor Pool located in Queens Park and the Jack Hort Memorial located at the Healesville High School, Cameron’s Road, Healesville. The operational review of each facility includes:

The provision of facilities;

Usage and attendances;

Financial performance;

Technical operations;

3.1 Healesville Outdoor Pool

The Healesville Outdoor Pool is located as part of a range of sporting and leisure facilities in Queens Park, Don Road Healesville. This facility provides a 50m x 18 metres non heated outdoor pool, learner (12 m x 8 m) and toddler pools with shade structure (10m x 10m), kiosk and lawn area.

3.1.1 Opening Hours

The pool is a seasonal facility open during the months of November to March. The pool is open 7 days including public holidays 1pm - 6pm if the day's temperature is at 23 degrees Celsius or above

The pool is serviced by approximately 100 dedicated car parking spaces.

Figure 1 Healesville Outdoor Pool

3.1.2 Usage Review

A review of usage of the Healesville Outdoor Pool over the last six years – 2006/2007 to 2013/2014 - has been completed and is summarised in the graph below:

3 Healesville Aquatic Facilities Operational Review

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A review of usage over the past three years indicates

Usage of the Centre over the past six years has remained relatively stable with a high of 7,478 visits in 2006/2007 to 6,069 visits in 2011/2012.

Seasonal pool usage is impacted by weather conditions by between 25% to 30%.

When compared to other outdoor pools across Victoria the usage of Queens Park Outdoor Pool is relatively low.

3.1.3 Financial Review

The Queens Park Pool is managed under contract by the Belgravia Leisure. The table below provides a summary of the operational performance of the Centre over the past eight years. Table 3.1 Queens Park Outdoor Pool - Financial Review Summary 2006/2007 – 2013/2014

HEALESVILLE 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13

Attendance 7,317 8,756 7,478 4,939 5,742 5,176 5,806 6,069 7,695

(Profit)/Loss 46,044 48,025 55,805 53,834 69,891 42,849 47,253 32,876 37,511

Contract Administration Fee 1,279 1,292 1,332 2,628 2,879 5,000 5,090 5,248 5,410

Balance of Council Payment 17 3,051 62 6,005 7,894 9,600 6,334

Maintenance Costs 10,964 10,199 19,843 23,361 24,570 13,997 20,361 27,452 22,587

Operating Costs 524 335 453 77

Council Direct Staff Costs 1,853 1,909 1,966 2,025 2,086 3,223 3,320 3,419 3,522

TOTAL 60,140 61,442 81,997 81,910 99,426 71,598 84,252 79,048 75,441

Cost per attendance 8.2 7.0 11.0 16.6 17.3 13.8 14.5 13.0 9.8

The financial review for Queens Park for the past nine years indicates:

The operational loss of the Centre has fluctuated over the nine year period from $46,044 in 2004/2005 to $37,511 in 2012/2013.

Maintenance expenditure has increased over the period ranging from $10,964 in 2004/2005 to $22,587 in 2012/2013.

Cost per attendance has fluctuated over the period ranging from $8.20 in 2004/2005 to $9.80 in 2012/2013.

It should be noted that during the review period the contract for the management of the pool changed from the YMCA to Belgravia Leisure in 2009/2010

7,478

4,939 5,742

5,176 5,806 6,069

7,695 8,510

-

1,000

2,000

3,000

4,000

5,000

6,000

7,000

8,000

9,000

Queens Park Outdoor Pool Usage 2006/2007 - 2013/2014

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3.1.4 Technical Review In 2007 a technical review of all Councils Pools was undertaken by David Powick and Associates. The report identified that:

All pools leaked and the most likely cause would be structure leakage and leakage through compromised original reticulation pipework. Council has since replaced the pipework and expansion joints to address the major leak problems.

Evidence of stress cracking was also reported in some sections of tiling around the main pile suggesting movement of the structures.

Due to its age and poor condition, the task of upgrading this pool would be significant. Primary works would need to include:

New filtration system(s)

Reduce leakage from all pools

Repair damaged and dangerous tiling

Re-paint the interior of the pools

Upgrade warning and depth signage.

Around $1,500,000 would be required for new pipe work, new filtration, structural alterations, pool tiling and concourse refurbishment. At least $3,000,000 would be needed to replace the venue with its modern equivalent.

3.1.5 Life Saving Victoria – Aquatic Safety Assessment Safety Improvement Plan 2014

An Aquatic Facility Safety Assessment of the Healesville Outdoor Pool was conducted on 18th February, 2014. During the assessment an Aquatic Facility Safety Assessment Checklist was completed. The Aquatic Facility Safety Assessment contains questions developed by the Royal Life Saving Society Australia relating to particular aspects of safety which in the RLSSA's experience are relevant.

The Aquatic Facility Safety Assessment completed on 18th February, 2014 achieved a compliance of 22 out of 31 Qualification items, a compliance of 76 out of 117 total items and a Safety Score of 65.57%. This result can be improved by:

Implementation of the Safety Improvement Plan

Regular internal reviews of the issues affecting safety at the Centre.

Internal Assessments.

Compliance with the RLSSA Guidelines for Safe Pool Operation and other statutes and regulations. Continued periodic independent Aquatic Facility Safety Assessments.

3.2 Healesville Indoor Pool

The Healesville Indoor Pool is located in the grounds of the Healesville High School, Cameron’s Road Healesville.

The facility includes an indoor 25 metre pool and a small toddlers pool. The pool was built in 1989/90 as a partnership between the school, Council and the Healesville Rotary Club.

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3.2.1 Opening Hours:

The pool is used by both the school as part of its physical education and curriculum and by the community. The pool is open for the pool 7 days a week 6.00 am to 9.00pm.

Figure 2 Healesville High School - Jack Hort Memorial Indoor Pool

3.2.2 Usage Review

A review of usage of Indoor Pool – 2006/2007 to 2011/2012 - has been completed and is summarised in the graph below:

A review of usage over the past three years indicates

Usage of the Centre over the past four years indicates a decline with a high of 49, 669 in 2007 to a low of 38,440 in 2011.

This decline represents a decrease of 11,229 visits over the six-year period (23%).

The management of the centre operates learn to swim program and is the home of the local swimming club who train at the facility a regular basis.

47,866 49669 45544

43415 42096 38440

0

10,000

20,000

30,000

40,000

50,000

60,000

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

Healesville Indoor Pool

2006 - 2011

Indoor Pool

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The table below indicates the public casual visits versus the program attendances. Table 3.2 Usage by Type Comparison

Year Total Usage Public Programs

2006 47,866

21,557 26,309

2007 49,669 22,834 26,835

2008 45.544

20,869 24,675

2009 43,415

19,650 23,855

2010 42,096 18,037 24,059

2011 38,440 15,446 22,994

3.2.3 Financial Review

The Indoor pool is managed by the Healesville High School. The table below provides a summary of the operational performance of the Centre over the past three years. Table 3.3 Healesville Indoor Pool - Financial Review Summary 2009 -2011

Category Annual Revenue $

Annual Expenditure $

Net Operating Result Profit/(Loss)

$

2009 $309,522 $317,226 ($7,704)

2010 $299,892 $343,386 ($43,494)

2011 $269,771 $343,455 ($73,684)

It should be noted that the above income figures include an annual contribution by the Yarra Ranges Council of $5,000 and funds raised by the Rotary Club of Healesville.

Figure 3 Healesville Indoor Pool - Financial Review 2009–2011

$309,522 $299,892 $269,771

$317,226 $343,386 $343,455

($7,704) ($43,494)

($73,684) ($100,000)

($50,000)

$0

$50,000

$100,000

$150,000

$200,000

$250,000

$300,000

$350,000

$400,000

2009 2010 2011

Healesville Indoor Pool- Financial Performance

2009 - 2011

Income

Expenditure

Deficit

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The financial review for the Healesville Indoor Pool for the past three years indicates:

The centre revenue has decreased over the three year review period ranging from $309,522 2009 to $269,771 in 2011.

Expenditure for the Centre has increased over the three year period ranging from $317,226 in 2009 to 343,455 in 2011.

The operating performance of the centre has significantly decreased as a result ranging from $7,704 in 2009 to $73,684 in 2011.

Discussions with the school principal indicates that the decrease in expenditure and the resultant increase in operating deficit is as a result of the increasing maintenance costs associated with the ageing facility.

The principal further indicated that the pool is not part of core business, is outside of the schools “entitlement” which means that no additional funds to maintain the facility is provided by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development.

The school indicated that they are unable to sustain the increasing operational loss of the facility. They have indicated to council that they would like to cease operating the service as a result of the high subsidy required.

The school relies extremely heavily on the Rotary Club to help fund the pool. In 2012 the rotary Club provided approximately $24,000.

In 2008 the Council provided $100,000 towards major maintenance items. This funding was used for the upgrade and replacement of plant and equipment.

In 2014 council approved an additional $40,000 to fund the operational deficit for a further 12-month period. It was determined that additional funding to support the operations of the facility would be considered upon review of the recommended strategies within this report.

To address the ongoing operational deficit the school reduced the hours of operations. In collaboration with Council the hours of operation have now been readjusted to better meet the community needs.

A review of the Joint Use Agreement between the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development and Council has also been instigated.

When usage results are linked to the financial results the following business indicator trends are recorded: Table 3.4 Healesville Indoor Pool – Operational Performance Review 2006/2007 – 2010/2011

Category 2009 2010 2011

Income $309,522 $299,892 $269,771

Expenditure $317,226 $343,386 $343,455

Net Operating (Loss) Surplus ($7,704) ($43,494) ($73,684)

Attendance 43,415 42,096 38,440

Revenue per User $7.13 $7.12 $7.02

Expenditure per User $7.31 $8.16 $8.93

Subsidy/surplus Per User ($0.18) ($1.03) ($1,92)

Revenue as a % of Expenditure 97.6% 87% 79%

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The business indicator review indicates that:

Revenue per visit has decreased from a high of $7.31 in 2009 to a low of $7.02 in 2011.

Expenditure per visit has increased from a low of $7.31 2009 to $8.93 2011.

The subsidy per user has increased from $.18 in 2009 to $1.92 in 2011.

Revenue as a percentage of expenditure has decreased from 97.6% in 2009 to 79% in 2011 as the Centre began to record increasing operating deficit.

3.2.4 Replacement of the Indoor Pool

As a point of comparison if the indoor pool at the school were to be redeveloped to meet the current standards and facility requirements the cost range based on similar recently developed facilities would range between $8M to $12M depending on the scope and facility components.

3.2.5 Summary of Key Issues

The Review of the existing aquatic facilities in the Healesville area indicates:

The two aquatic facilities, Healesville Outdoor Pool and the Healesville Indoor Pool are at the end of their useful life. The facilities have aged and no longer meet current facility standards and community expectations.

The technical review of the outdoor pool indicated that significant work is required to upgrade the plant and pipe work. The cost of these works at the time of the review was estimated at $1.5M.

Considerable work to the plant and equipment is also required at the indoor pool however the school does not have the capacity to fund these works

The indoor facility is operating at a deficit, which the school is no longer prepared to fund. Council has recently approved funding to meet the operating deficit for 2014.

The usage review of the outdoor pool indicates that visitations are remaining relatively constant at an average of 6,500 visits per year. It should be noted that outdoor seasonal pools are impacted by weather conditions by between 25% to 30%.

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This section of the report summarises the various market research and consultation processes and associated findings to assist in identifying future aquatic health and fitness and event facilities demand and trends. It includes summaries from:

Project Reference Group Meetings

Household Telephone Survey

Schools Survey

Key Informant Interviews

Focus Groups

4.1 Household Telephone Survey This section summarises the key findings from the Yarra Ranges Shire Council area residents' telephone survey conducted in May 2012. The survey involved 300 residents (aged 15 years and older) who were randomly selected to provide information on:

Current use or non-use of swimming pools

Future use or non-use of swimming pools

Yarra Ranges Aquatic Facility issues and needs

Respondent profile. The respondent's profile was developed to reflect the population spread of people in the Healesville and the Yarra Valley surrounding area. All respondents were surveyed by telephone. The survey questions were based on a range of SGL aquatic surveys standard questions and principally sought information on peoples' use of public swimming pools which included Council, school, private and commercial centres but not home pools.

4.2 Respondent Profile The following table summarises the Resident Telephone Survey respondent sample: Table 4.1 Resident Telephone Survey Respondent Sample

CATEGORY SUB-GROUP NUMBER %

Gender Male 136 45

Female 164 55

Age Range 15 - 19 years 27 9

20 - 29 years 26 9

30 – 39 years 35 12

40 - 49 years 59 20

50 - 59 years 54 18

60 years plus 99 33

Postcode Healesville 268 89

Chum Creek 13 4

4 Market Research and Consultation

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CATEGORY SUB-GROUP NUMBER %

Badgers Creek 13 4

Toolangi 5 2

Other 2 1

Identified as Having a Disability Yes 33 11

No 267 89

Country of Birth Australia 231 77

England 35 12

Netherlands 6 2

Germany 6 2

New Zealand 4 1

Other 18 6

A review of the survey sample indicates all responses are within 2 to 5 per cent of existing Shire age profile, area population and gender distribution indicating a reasonably balanced and similar sample profile.

4.2.1 Current Use of Swimming Pools

Survey respondents were questioned on their use of public swimming pools in the past 12 months. Public swimming pools included Council, school and commercial centres, but not home pools. An average use of swimming pools was identified through the survey responses. A total of fifty six per cent (56%) of people had used or visited a pool in the past 12 months. A total forty four per cent (44%) had not used or visited a pool in the past 12 months. Based on current population estimates of the Healesville and the Yarra Valley area (9,634) there are approximately 5,396 people in the area currently using swimming pools/leisure centres. This level of participation is within current averages for Victoria.

4.2.2 Regional Swimming Pool Participation Comparisons

Comparison of these pool usage results with the southern/eastern and western metropolitan based on previous Council aquatic participation survey results completed by SGL in the following two tables:

Table 4.2 Western Region Usage Comparisons Pool Usage Trends 2000 to 2010

Used Or Not Used

A Swimming

Pool In Past 12 Months

Wyndham City

Council Sample (400)

%

Brimbank City

Council Sample (300)

%

Hobsons Bay City Council Sample (300)

%

Maribyrnong City Council

Sample (300)

%

Melton Shire

Council Sample (300)

%

Moonee Valley City

Council Sample (300)

%

Western Metro

Average

%

Yes 54 51 46 50 63 56 53

No 46 49 54 50 37 44 47

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Table 4.3 South-Eastern Metro Region Pool Usage Trends 2000 to 2010

Used or not used

swimming pool/leisure

centre in past 12 months

Yarra Valley area Council

Sample (300)

%

South-Eastern Metro Region Pool Usage

Boroondara CC (Sample

400) %

Monash CC

(Sample 500)

%

Knox CC (Sample

350) %

Casey CC

(Sample 400)

%

Stonington CC (Sample

452) %

South/East Metro

Average (2100)

%

Yes 56 60.7 48.0 51.0 49.0 53.0 48.3

No 44 39.3 52.0 49.0 51.0 47.0 51.7

4.2.3 Pool User Profile Comparisons

Usage of swimming pools does change by gender, age profile and area people live, as the following results indicate:

Table 4.4 Usage of Swimming Pool Variances Against Sample Average

CATEGORY SUB-GROUP % USED POOLS

VARIANCE AGAINST USED

AVERAGE (56%)

Gender Male 49 -7

Female 62 +6

Age Range

15-29 years 35 -21

30-49 years 73 +17

50-69 years 44 -12

70 years + 36 -20

The pool usage results indicate:

More females (62%) than males (49%) use pools. This trend is similar to other aquatic participation surveys we have completed in Melbourne metro areas.

People in their most active years (15 to 49 years old) make the highest use of pools:

Area Average 56%

o 30 to 49 years 73%

Pool usage participation rates drop as in younger and older people

Area Average 56%

o 15 – 29 35%

o 50 -69 44%

o 70 years plus 29%

This may be indicative of the lack of contemporary aquatic and leisure facilities available in the Healesville and the Yarra Valley area. These age range results indicate higher than average pool usage for people aged 30 to 49 years

4.2.4 Reasons for Non-Use of Swimming Pools

Slightly more than four out of ten respondents (44%) had not used a swimming pool in the past 12 months. The main reasons respondents gave for non-use were:

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Table 4.5 Reasons for Non-Use of Swimming Pools

Reasons for non-use of Swimming Pools

% of Total Population

Gender

Male %

Female %

Not interested 36 35 37

Too busy 27 29 24

Too old 9 6 13

Don’t like swimming 8 7 8

Work commitments 7 7 6

Health problems 5 3 8

No suitable facilities close by 5 - 10

Have own pool 5 4 5

Unhygienic facilities 4 3 5

The constraints that affect people’s use of pools change depending upon their gender and age. The main constraints to use of swimming pools can be categorised under a number of common themes, being:

• Personal Issues: Not interested 36%, too busy/work 27%, Too old/health issues 14%, don’t like swimming 8%

• Product Issues: No suitable facilities close by 5%, and unhygienic facilities 4%

• Placement Issues: Have and use own pool: 5%.

There were no issues around promotion i.e. Lack of Information/Do not know what is available; which is often identified as a constraint to participation.

4.2.5 Most Popular Swimming Pools

The usage rates of people using swimming pools are spread around a large number of different facilities. Respondents who had used a swimming pool in the past 12 months listed 7 different facilities. A summary of the most pools used, compared to the pool people nominated as the one they use the most is as follows:

Table 4.6 Most Popular and Used Swimming Pools

SWIMMING POOL SWIMMING POOLS USED IN PAST 12 MONTHS (MULTIPLE

ANSWERS) %

MOST USED SWIMMING POOL IN PAST 12 MONTHS (ONE CENTRE ONLY)

%

Healesville Indoor Pool 68% 53%

Queens Park Outdoor Pool 29% 15%

Yarra Centre 17% 9%

RACV Country Club 14% 13%

Croydon Leisure and Aquatic Centre 3% 2%

Seville Water Play 1% -

Croydon Outdoor Pool 1% 1%

Lilydale Outdoor Pool 1% -

Kilsyth Centenary Pool 1% 1%

Other 11% 7%

The pool usage data clearly indicates Council's pools receive high use both the indoor and outdoor pools in Healesville (Indoor 68% outdoor 29%). High use was also made of the Yarra Centre located in Yarra Junction and the RACV Country Club which is a privately owned facility requiring user to purchase a membership.

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4.2.6 Rating of Council's Swimming Pools

Survey respondents who had used Queens Park Outdoor were asked to rate it under a 5 point rating system being:

Excellent 8%

Good 24%

Adequate 51%

Poor 14%

Very poor 2%

It should be noted that compared to similar surveys, these results indicate a high rating of adequate to very poor for the facilities 67%. We would normally see a higher “good” rating.

4.2.7 Poor Facility Rating Issues

For the respondents who rated the Centre poor or very poor the main issues that cause this rating were – respondents could identify up to 3 responses:

Change rooms 50%

No indoor pool 38%

Outdoor areas 13%

No gym 13%

Facility location 13%

No warm water pool 13%

4.2.8 Swimming Pool Usage Profiles

The following sections provide data on the top five most used pools in relation to frequency of use, reason for choosing pool and who usually go with:

1) Frequency of use of most used pool?

Daily 1%

4-6 times a week 5%

2-3 times/week 19%

Weekly 22%

Fortnightly 6%

Monthly 14%

Less than monthly 32%

These results indicate a relatively low regular use of facilities compared to other similar facilities.

2) Reasons choose most used pool?

Close to home 42%

Good facilities 22%

Warm water 14%

It has an indoor pool 13%

Family/friends use 7%

Range of pools 7%

To use outdoor areas 4%

To take part in a fitness activity 4%

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3) How do they travel to the most used pool?

Car 86%

Cycle 1%

Public transport 1%

Walk 11%

Other 1%

This may be influenced by the lack of public transport in the area. 4) Main activities usually do at most used pool?

Lap swimming 46%

Recreation/swimming 39%

Take child to pool 21%

Aquaerobics 10%

Use Gymnasium 8%

To take part in aquatic program 5%

Spectator 3%

Take part in a club activity 2%

5) Who do you usually go to the pool with?

Family members 57%

On own 33%

Friends 8%

4.2.9 Future Use of Swimming Pools

To assist in identifying the level of demand for future use of swimming pools, respondents were asked if they would like to make greater use of pools in the future. Seventy five per cent (75%) of people indicated they would like to use pools in the future. The highest future demand for use of pools will come:

Females (79%) compared to males (71%).

People in their most active years aged 15 to 29 years (92%), 30 to 49 years (84%) and 50 to 69 years (69%) and 70 years + (49%)

4.2.10 Facilities and Features that Would Encourage Greater Future Use of Pools

Respondents who indicated they would like to make greater future use of swimming pools were asked to nominate up to three features that would encourage more use. There were 76 facilities/features nominated with the most popular responses being:

Longer opening hours 25%

Warm water pool 23%

Cleaner more hygienic facilities 18%

Improved outdoor areas 10%

More indoor program pools 7%

Indoor competition pool 5%

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Improved social area/cafe 5%

More variety of activities and programs 4%

Crèche childcare 3%

More activities for children 3%

These results indicate support for an integrated aquatic and leisure facility providing a range of aquatic facilities and programs.

4.3 School Survey

The 8 primary and secondary school located within the Healesville and Yarra Valley area were sent a survey in June 2012. A total of 6 schools completed and returned the surveys. Appendix Three of this report provides details of the individual school comments.

4.3.1 Use of Aquatic Centres

School representatives were asked a range of questions about their schools use of Aquatic Centres and aquatic/health and fitness based programs and services. The questions were aimed at identifying aquatic participation and facility usage trends and key reasons why activities and facilities were selected. Of the 6 schools that completed the survey, a total of 5 schools indicated that they had participated in a Learn to Swim or School Sports Program. One schools indicated they did not participate in aquatic based programs. Based on these responses, a total of 83% of schools indicated they participated in a learn to swim or school sports programs. The schools that do not participate in a Learn to Swim Program or School Sports Program indicated that the cost, location of the facilities and the lack of transportation to the facilities were the main issue restricting the schools participation.

4.3.2 Schools Aquatic Program Coordination

Of the 5 schools who participated in Learn to Swim or School Sports Programs, all programs were coordinated by pool staff.

4.3.3 Frequency of Student Visitations in Learn to Swim Program

Of the schools who participate in aquatic-based programs, the average number of student visits is detailed below:

8 Visits 2 schools

More than 10 visits 3 schools

The frequency of visitation results indicates that between 8 and 10 visits were made by the students of the learn to swim programs.

4.3.4 Most Popular Terms

To gain an understanding, of when schools use swimming pools, they were asked to nominate which school term they typically use pools. The results are detailed below:

Term One 2 Schools

Term Two 1 Schools

Term Three 4 School

Term Four 5 Schools

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The results indicate that terms one, three and four were the most popular terms and that schools are more likely to plan aquatic based programs during the warmer months which allows Aquatic Centre operators to plan for peak school usage during these periods.

4.3.5 Most Popular Swimming Pools

The schools were requested to nominate the main swimming pool(s) used for the aquatic programs. The following indicates the most popular swimming pools used:

Queens Park Outdoor Pool 1 school

Healesville Indoor Pool 5 schools

Yarra Centre 1 school

The schools indicated that the Healesville Indoor Pool was most popular facility used by the schools The main reasons schools gave for choosing their most used swimming pools were:

Close to School 5 schools

Good facilities 2 schools

Affordable price 4 schools

Heated indoor swimming pool 1 schools

Indoor facilities 4 schools

Quality of programs 2 schools

4.3.6 Features Would Like to See Developed

The main features that would encourage schools to make greater use of swimming pools in the future were:

Separate School change rooms 2 schools

More indoor heated pools 4 schools

Cheaper entry fees 4 schools

Greater range of water spaces 3 schools

Access at different times than allocated 4 schools

Access to more swimming instructors 2 schools

The results indicated the provision of separate school change rooms, more indoor heated pools and cheaper entry fees top three priorities that would encourage schools to make greater use of swimming pools in the future.

4.3.7 School Based Aquatic Facilities

No Schools within the area surveyed had a school based facilities.

4.4 Key Stakeholder Interviews

Discussions were held with a range of key informants to discuss current and future needs and opportunities for co-location of facilities. The following provides a summary of their key needs and issues related to current and future facilities. A list of the groups and individuals interviewed is provided in Appendix C.

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Table 4.7 Key Stakeholder Interviews

Organisation Contact Person

Rivendell Merran Macs

Rivendell is a non-government mental health service providing a rural program for residents in Yarra Junction, Healesville and Lilydale.

A range of activities for mental health recovery are offered including physical fitness and arts activities.

Receives Department of Health funding.

A gym program is offered once a week where approximately 4 – 7 people travel by bus from Healesville to Lilydale. It takes approximately 25 – 30 minutes to travel to Lilydale. The gyms in Healesville are too expensive to use.

Rec Link pays for the gym program.

Rec Link is likely to withdraw funding for the gym program within a couple of weeks, at best to Christmas.

Clients prefer to go as a group rather than attending individually as they need support and routine.

Would support a local gym development if it was accessible to those on low incomes. Clients choose to participate in classes or a gym program.

4.5 EFT’s and volunteers.

The program includes activities where clients can gain confidence and enjoy community life together in a supportive group. Activities offered include a gym program once a week, singing, walking classes, art classes etc.

Some activities are run at the facility headquarters however the multipurpose room is used as a lounge. Equipment and furniture needs to be moved around for each session.

A focus group meeting was held recently with 10 women attending. They were asked about their needs for an indoor aquatic facility. The following responses were provided:

o 3 currently use the high school pool o 1 does aqua aerobics o The school pool does not have a feeling of a public facility o Too small and claustrophobic o Aqua classes are offered at 8am or 6.30pm. Classes get very crowded o Parking is too far away, no lighting to the car park o No privacy in the change rooms, prefer more discrete change facilities o Need lockers o Need a cafe to provide social opportunities after classes o Prefer salt water disinfection system o Facilities need to be cleaner o Showers need to be hot o Current facility has poor heating or no heating in the changerooms

The Health Service sees a potential demand for a warm water exercise pool, spa and sauna facilities. There is not a current demand but this has never been an option.

The Health Service runs a yoga program at the service headquarters in Badger Creek Road however, the room is too small and furniture and equipment has to be moved out of the way.

A new facility for yoga would be welcomed if the facility was carpeted, warm and quiet.

There is a shift in the way non-government health services are being offered. The preference is to run the programs and activities in public facilities rather than the health service facilities to integrate clients into the community for more long term, sustainable outcomes.

A facility needs to have meeting spaces for people to socialise informally after activities where food and beverages can be consumed.

Services need to be affordable for the clients and the service providers.

YMCA Jacinda Erich

Jacinda is a Community Development Officer delivering the Access for All Abilities Program (AAA) for the area.

The AAA program is funded through SRV until 31st December 2012 however, it is likely the program

will continue beyond this date but may also cover other areas of disadvantage.

Yarra Junction run by Belgravia is seen as a community hub. They are very big and have a good mix or people and sports

They run Fit Kids (Teen gym) for all abilities which has approximately 5 participants with disabilities attending. They need help to promote

Travel to Yarra Junction is too far

Indigenous youth find it too far to get to Yarra Junction, not sustainable with transport.

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Healesville to service Yarra Glen

Transport often requires public transport and taxies which means personal cars are really required

They tried to run Fit Kids at Monbulk & Kisyth however there was no gym space, so would like gym space to be included on Masterplan, also space for basketball, pool and outdoor space.

Jacinda would like to re-link the programs here make the price very cheap and accessible and run two weeks hot of a full term 6-8 weeks instead of 10.

YC run disability aquatic programs well. Kilsyth have a 1:1 program and also run casual swim squad for adults to practice swimming skills

Jacinda wants reasonable costs for programs

YMCA’s with Open Door Programs attracted low socio economic people well

Yarra Glen Township Group

The Yarra Glen Township Group started in 2006

Many people from the district use the school pool multiple times per week

Great feedback about the pool o Good community feel o A lot of people aren’t aware of it

They would rather travel to Healesville than Lilydale

A small amount of money was raised to build a pool in Yarra Glen (approx $30K) however it never went ahead the money went back to the Football/Netball club

They need more access to public transport for kids to be independent and good transport to it from other areas

25m lap pool with other program space is required to minimise crowding of lanes

More pool use is in the mornings for fitness activities

Yarra Junction is too far to travel and not sure about public transport from Yarra Glen

Don’t like uni-sex cubicles

Cater for all age groups and abilities elderly etc.

It has to service surrounding areas

Healesville Chamber of Commerce (70 Businesses)

Integration of facilities

Variety of activities such as yoga and Tai Chi

The Healesville gym is industrial, run down, small and not great

Curves and Steps have closed

The High School pool is very busy with lessons

Outdoor pool is too cold

Montrox – put a dome over

RACV Club have a gym and 25m 3 lane pool, they have aquatic classes and gym classes but only caters for 1% of the population

Will attract traffic from the East

Tourist trade – higher than normal tourist trade

Teenage market need variety in sport and aquatic

The indigenous population is about 7 – 10%

Friends Group

The Friends Groups was developed in 2005

Fundraising for maintenance – Rotary the Shire matched the maintenance money ($100K)

They would prefer to keep current pool going till new pool is built

Would like beach entry, water park and older people aquatics.

Location they like Yarra Junction but consider public transport and Queens Park would be a good location

Yarra Valley Community Centre

Yarra Valley Community Centre offers o School pool for hydro 2 sessions a week could increase classes for Yarra Junction

Not warm enough for hydro Access is only via steps Needs handrails around hydro pool Only running a bit of one on one at the school pool

o 2 session at Yarra Junction o 1 session at Community Centre should do 2 o Tai Chi at Community Centre o Anti natal at Yarra Junction

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o Gentle exercise Tuesdays and Fridays and bus some people from Kinglake and Chum Creek

o Paediatrics o Lions Club run a Wednesday class for arthritis

Temporary Building / portable at Healesville o Disability accessible but not great door not wide enough o MP Space with gym equipment only used during classes o Equipment needs to be more around o Only approximately 10x8m o Meeting room is 4x10m used most days by community groups – community service

providers

Eastern Health – Community health area of Eastern Health – Michelle does the health promotion – Healesville kids (&-11) want a gym, young mums – body image issues

Would like Healthy kiosk/ non smoking / crèche programs, security car parking, lighting, potential for partnership for physio rooms

Seating for spectators and carers

Community Member Barbara Flynn 5962 3208

Member of RACV

High School pool used by many o Is clean o Facilities inadequate o 3 showers no privacy o Lots of toilets o Size is good o Great swim teachers o Too noisy

Outdoor pool too limited by times

The Country Club you have to be a member

RACV pool too small only 3 lanes and too many members

Likes Yarra Junction

Prefers Don Road for new development o Shallow one end and deep the other o Prefer gym o Aqua aerobics o Swim lessons o No spa o Steam room o No dry sauna

Lots of people in Healesville go to school pool many swim laps regularly and aqua aerobics

Pool User Sharon Cant

Sharon has MS and has to come in the back door to use the school pool

Water quality is great

Staff great

Can’t get from the car park to the pool

Ramp facilities would be great

Sharon doesn’t use change room as they are too far away

Needs o disabled areas o gymnasium o mp space for classes

Sharon sometimes does aqua classes however they are too hot, hot facilities are not good for MS

Swim Club – Healesville SC Beverly and Mark

School pool has swim lessons which fill the school pool and outdoor pool

Beverly does aqua at indoor pool

Needs a place to display history of school and outdoor pool

Need 50m for swim club competitions and adult swim lessons, rehab

Many people done know about the indoor pool

Could get more fundraising if they got a 50m pool

Beverly wants more community meetings and consultation

Beverly feels you can’t rely on what happens at the indoor pool to gauge what is needed at the new pool

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New pool o Has to make a profit o Consulting rooms o Gym o Busses coming from Yea, Kinglake and Alexandra

The population doubles on weekends

Locations o Junior football club is talking about moving to senior football ground at Don Rd complex nest

and swap with soccer club. o Traffic management needs to be addresses to Queens Park o Could do Dons Rd complex nest to netball courts

If the pool has to be 25m there has to be a separate area for swim club

Beverly would like to see a public meeting at the community hall

She would be happy to sit at Coles and seek further feedback

4.5 Aquatic and Health and Fitness Facility Provision

Previous research and industry trends indicate that the future viability of aquatic and leisure facilities may be affected by the range of facilities that are located within the primary catchment area. Leisure and sporting facility trends and benchmarking generally indicate that local or municipal recreation or sporting facilities have a primary catchment radius of approximately 5 Km and a secondary catchment radius of 10 km. In general approximately 75% to 85% of users will reside within a 0 Km to 5 km radius of a facility with the remaining 15% to 25% coming from areas within the 5 Km to 10 km radius of the facility. Regional facilities providing unique facility components and major attractors will draw users from a much wider catchment than a local/municipal facility. The size and shape of the catchment area will be influenced by a number of factors including: the range and quality of facilities and services offered, natural and built barriers i.e. freeways, travel times and the availability of competing facilities. In metropolitan Melbourne, it is not uncommon for facilities to share catchment areas, particularly the secondary catchment areas. The Aquatics and Recreation Victoria: Indoor Aquatic & Recreation Facility Development Guidelines: October 2011 indicates that catchment population is now based on numbers required to support a facility with strong appreciation that individuals will operate without consideration to local government boundaries.

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Table 4.8 Aquatics and Recreation Victoria: Indoor Aquatic & Recreation Facility Development Guidelines

Description Catchment

Population Estimate Typical General Components

Rural Under 10,000

Shared competition and shallow water to reduced separate water areas Dry/gym facilities as future development option Usually linked to other community facilities to share management and operation cost

Local 10,000 – 40,000

Limited program water combined with leisure water Limited dry/gym facilities

District 40,000 – 70,000

Ability to separate program and leisure water Larger dry/gym facilities Additional limited facilities

Major 70,000 – 100,00

More extensive program and leisure water Consideration of indoor 50m pool and complementary warm water pool Increased gym and program space Additional complementary amenities, food and beverage

Regional 100,000 – 150,000

Extensive and varied program leisure water and attractions Inclusion of indoor 50m pool and separate warm water pools Wellness/health club and extensive program room inclusions Complementary services and amenities, crèche, food and beverage

Source: The Aquatics and Recreation Victoria: Indoor Aquatic & Recreation Facility Development Guidelines: October 2011

The maps on the following page detail the current dry health and fitness facilities and aquatic facilities located within Yarra Ranges and the surrounding municipalities.

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4.5.1 Aquatic and Health Aquatic and Health and Fitness Facility Provision

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4.5.2 Aquatic and Health Aquatic and Health and Fitness Facility Provision

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4.6 Aquatic and Leisure Facility Trends

The information draws from a review of a large sample of industry market research projects that have been carried out over the past five years to assist in defining aquatic and indoor facility and related leisure trends. SGLs extensive experience in the development of aquatic and leisure facilities knows they usually become a highly emotive and public interest debate and usually organised formal groups (specialist users of pools) may dominate consultation processes whilst the general resident/casual and recreation user (highest user of pools) sometimes is not involved or heard. In many cases when a Council is faced with developing or redeveloping an aquatic facility the debate about the right components for the community it is to serve may at times be dominated by:

The priority for long course competition, lap swimming and training facilities (50m or 25m lap pools) sometimes at the expense of not including or building multi-use high use viable water areas as well.

The need for deep water to meet specialist sport needs which adds operating cost and also restrictions to who can use the water. Selection of these areas must be done with financial and user impacts clearly highlighted.

Lack of a co-coordinated strategy for other existing pools in the project area and user catchment zones so there is not duplication of the same thing in the same user zones.

Lack of knowledge on local competitor facilities and user markets of why and how people use pools and what they pay for the different user categories. Participation trends usually show only a small user market use pools for swimming up and down in whilst people usually come more often to pools for recreation, fun, enjoyment, socialization, education and therapy.

Not learning from other facilities built that have only developed limited water areas.

Not ensuring all user markets are a priority so that a mix of water areas become an essential part of a successful aquatic leisure centre design brief.

To assist in setting some of the more evident aquatic facility and leisure trends that are impacting on local communities we have also added to our company’s knowledge by also reviewing a range of study references from the many specialist companies who supply aquatic facility development feasibility and development services. This process does allow us to highlight many of the aquatic facility and related leisure trends that impact on the people and can be used as a useful guide to selecting priority components for successful high use and viable aquatic leisure centres.

4.6.1 Leisure and Aquatic Trends that Impact on Leisure Facilities

The following summary of general leisure trends impacting on people and their demand for recreation, sport and leisure activities and in particular aquatic facilities has been developed using a range of aquatic facility feasibility documents General Leisure trends impacting on aquatic leisure facilities design, facility components and user attraction include:

A gradual aging of the population. As life expectancy increases, birth rates stay low and the “baby boomers” of the 1950s and 1960s grow older. This is placing a new demand on providing programmed hotter water areas as well as pools suitable for therapy and older adult exercises. It also means it is essential to have a range of pools with different water depths and temperatures.

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Flexibility in the times when people recreate. As demands on people’s time increases and work practices change people are seeking to take their recreation at different times, over a broad spread of hours and at facilities that offer a lot of activities under the one roof. Indoor pools and health and fitness facilities are particularly attractive and getting easier to use as many are open 12 to 16 hours, 7 days a week

Increased variety in recreation and leisure options. People’s leisure and recreation options are changing towards newer more varied activities offered over a greater range of timeframes compared to previous decades where limited variety in activities and scheduling occurred. This has supported the trend to more multi-use facilities to attract a broader range of users as well as multiple water areas to meet different needs at the one centre.

Constraints to recreation and leisure participation. Lack of time, lack of facilities close by, family and work constraints, health problems and cost of service or use of facilities are the main constraints to many people’s recreation and leisure participation. The development of targeted markets of users, programs and services at aquatic and health and fitness centres has assisted in reducing some of these participation constraints

Changing employment structures, trading and work hours. These trends often makes participation in traditional sports difficult and therefore people are looking for facilities that are open longer hours and have a lot of activity options at the one site. This makes opportunities such as indoor pools attractive as their long opening hours and days open means usage can be made in a wide range of social, training, competition, educational settings.

Different people want different activities. The broadening different cultural, age, gender of the population sees the need for facilities to offer potential users a much more varied range of programs and services than previously offered. All year round indoor aquatic facilities also provide the greatest diversity of activities throughout the different seasons impacted by an areas local weather

Provision of high standards and quality of facilities and services. People are looking for high standard, high quality facilities and services to meet their recreation and leisure needs. This has also seen the trend for indoor facilities becoming very popular as they allow activity in safe and secure spaces in all weather and environmental conditions. This leads to indicating that building low standard, low cost facilities will not attract the maximum user market

Desire for activities to be affordable. The development of multi-purpose aquatic leisure centres has enabled the high operating cost activity of aquatics (in many cases) to be cross subsidised by more profitable activity areas such as health and fitness, food and beverage and entertainment areas. This has enabled many facilities to keep general entry fees low to encourage use whilst seeking users who want special services to contribute at a greater level to the cost of such activities.

Recognition of strong links between physical activity and health. Preventative health care and active lifestyles are very important to many people’s aquatic and health and fitness activities are becoming a large part of people’s activity choices.

Expectations of equity and access. Today’s society expects people with special needs to be catered for in public aquatic and leisure facilities. This has seen improved design features to increase accessibility to and within such facilities. Added to this is the growing array of programs and activities offered to people of all different abilities, physical condition and skill levels.

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4.6.2 General Aquatic Facility Trends

The main general aquatic facility trends that can impact on selection of high use activity components are detailed in the following graphic.

4.6.3 Specific Aquatic Facility Trends

Specific Aquatic Facility Trends that are impacting on people in the 21st Century include:

a) Aquatic Facility Trends and Main User Markets

Traditionally many local authority aquatic leisure facilities were built for specialist or limited market users (i.e. competitive swimmers or high level sport participants). Detailed planning and comprehensive feasibility studies now are able to show more targeted user profiles.

Such studies usually identify the demographic profile of residents in the project area, their current aquatic and leisure participation patterns and use of surrounding aquatic facilities that provide a sound base for more user friendly facilities.

Successful Facilities Model

SUCCESSFUL FACILITIES KEY

COMPONENTS TO MEET MAIN USER

MARKETS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

• Gym and Exercise studios

• Massage/Beauty Treatments

• Warm water program pools

HOSPITALITY

• Training and program rooms

• Meeting/social facilities

• Café and merchandising

LEISURE & ADVENTURE

• Indoor water play complex

• Free form play pools

• Adventure rides and pools

FITNESS & EDUCATION

• Competition/training pools

• Learn to Swim pools

• Spa/saunas

• Club/association facilities

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The majority of aquatic facility market research indicates future complexes must equally cater for four distinct aquatic user markets being:

Recreation and Leisure Market - usually made up of families, people coming with friends and groups for fun, relaxation, social activity and low level competition/participation.

Competitive/Training/Fitness Market - usually made up of people predominantly attending facilities alone for structured fitness or competition activities.

Education Market - usually made up of children and adults wishing to increase water safety and survival skills. Includes Learn to swim classes, school and club use and individuals improving their skills and techniques. They require hot water pools and water depths with some straight edges and easy water access etc.

Health and Therapy Market - usually made up of children, adults and older adults wanting to relax or exercise in hot water. This market also includes specialist health condition groups such as arthritis, asthma suffers, etc. They require hot water pools and associated health relaxation areas, i.e. Spa/saunas, etc.

Research indicates that the recreation and leisure market will be the largest as it contains people of all ages, ability, types, interest and gender. The competitive/ training/fitness market is a more specialist market as it usually contains younger, fitter and more active people who have made time to train and compete.

Main Aquatic User Markets

MAXIMUM AQUATIC FACILITY USER ATTRACTION SUBJECT TO

DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE

EDUCATION

• 10% to 15% of users

• Learn to swim, schools etc.

• Special needs users

THERAPY

• 10% to 15% of users

• Hydrotherapy

• Exercise classes in water

REC, LEISURE & ADVENTURE

• 60% - 70% of pool users

• Families, friends, social groups

• Coming for fun and play

FITNESS & TRAINING

• 20% to 25% of pool users

• Competitive swimmers

• Club/association users

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Previous research conducted by SGL Leisure Planning Team indicates that in many cases 60% to 70% of facility users come from the recreation/leisure sector with 20% to 30% coming from the competitive/training/fitness markets. The health and therapy and education markets can range from 10% to 20% of the market subject to the age and health profile of the community in which the facility is located. The most successful centres attract all user markets and should be set up to allow people to participate in a range of activities at the one site. The further addition of health and fitness facilities, spas and saunas and social areas have been very successful at many aquatic facilities, as they add to the user experience and contribute to people being attracted to attend these facilities more often.

(i) Aquatic Facilities Activity Areas

Industry trends indicate that the majority of current indoor standalone aquatic facilities revenue does not meet annual operating costs. Average losses range from $200,000 to $500,000 plus per annum. The limited numbers of Centres that are raising their operating costs show minimal return on capital investment. A review of the successful Centers’ business indicates that these Centres record:

High visits per meter

High expense recovery ability including capital repayment

High operating profits per visit

Excellent program range returns and attendances

High secondary spend returns

Excellent range of attendance types (adult/child ratio)

Draws users from a large catchment area

High revenue returns from health and fitness

To ensure financial viability and attract potential interest from capital investors, any future facility development must be designed with the above business aims in mind. This supports usually recommend activity area components that can:

Provide a mix of shallow leisure/recreation water with programmable water areas.

Provide high revenue generating complementary service areas such as spas, saunas, and food and beverage services.

Are located in a high traffic/visitation area.

Are located as part of other leisure facility development.

Traditionally, commercial investment in aquatic facilities has been in specialist pools such as learn-to-swim or as additions to health and fitness clubs. The high capital cost and limited financial returns have contributed to this situation. Recent projects do see an increase in the number of management groups prepared to invest capital funds in return for longer-term agreements.

(ii) Health and Fitness Activity Areas

Industry trends indicate that users of aquatic facilities are also significant users of health and fitness facilities. Location of each of these activity components at the one site improves financial viability. Health and fitness has the capacity to record high expense recovery returns, with many centres returning 125% to 180% of expenditure. Traditionally these returns can also attract commercial investors and operators to health and fitness facilities. Locating these facilities at aquatic centres increases the potential of cross-selling and spin-off use. It also improves the membership/program user and casual user ratio.

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Gyms have started to diversify to capitalise on the growing demand for fitness experiences. One such trend is the rise of 24-hour access gyms, such as Anytime Fitness, Jetts and Snap Fitness. People are seeking personal trainers to meet their unique health and fitness needs. In 2011 personal training held 19.8 per cent of the market share in the fitness industry and is forecast to grow (MacGowan, 2011). Publicly operated facilities in Victoria are reporting a growth in membership with older adults for strengthening programs including pilates and yoga. There has also been an increase in female users and a much greater mix of group fitness programs including personal training and Boot camp. (iii) Ancillary Services and Activity Areas

In recent years, there has been a trend to develop a range of complementary businesses in conjunction with aquatic leisure facilities. These include:

Wellness Centres/Day Spas: There is an emerging trend of adding in an area for specialist wellness activities, services and merchandising. The key services found at successful wellness centres include massage, beauty therapy treatments, gentle exercise classes and relaxation and time out activities.

Inclusion of such facilities offers a broader range of activities to a larger age profile of people. The massage and beauty therapy are high yield sales activities and also can have high linked merchandising product sales.

It is essential in developing such areas that they are located with good views, away from general public noise and viewing areas and have very good finishes and fittings. There needs to be a close by lounge for relaxation after treatment or classes.

Sports Medicine: Development of consulting rooms, with patient access to health and fitness and pools, have been excellent revenue generators.

Health and Therapeutic Services: Health consultancies, weight loss and therapeutic services linking in worker and accident rehabilitation patients to use the range of facilities with centre memberships paid by relevant authorities.

Health and Beauty Services: Leased areas to services such as beauticians, hair salons and body toning.

4.6.4 Potential Future Aquatic Facility Trends

Aquatic Facility reviews completed in Australia, North America, Canada, the Middle East and China during the past two years by SGL provides a guide to likely new aquatic facility innovations and trends.

Key features that should be considered when redeveloping or retrofitting high use aquatic facilities are:

(i) Leisure Play Equipment

Changing static shallow water areas into water play and fun zones is one of the most popular renovations. This can be done by adding simple play equipment, water sprays and interactive equipment to existing pools. Added to this is the option to introduce inflatable play equipment to allow the area to be changeable.

Many such outdoor pools that have been retrofitted have been linked to high use indoor pools.

(ii) Major Attraction Leisure Features

Water slides and similar challenge and adventure type activities have remained popular as long as the venue has a range of slides/rides to keep peoples interest. Single ride facilities struggle to keep interest due to the lack of variety. Multi ride areas allow users to try different length and configuration rides.

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There are also a range of new water rides that have a slide component leading to another ride experience such as dropping into a bowl and then water, or onto a ramp and then into a splash pool.

A key design trend is to link all slides to a common entry platform to ensure one staff person can supervise the area. A common splash down zone also allows one lifeguard to control a range of ride water entry points.

(iii) Special Effects

A range of North American Indoor leisure parks have added computerised light shows and sound systems to allow night time areas to be changed. The use of lights and sound provided users with new indoor facility experiences at night-time.

Some centres have gone further by adding projection walls to incorporate movies and short video clips with their new light and sound effects.

(iv) Leisure Furniture

Many centres aimed to keep parents and children at centres longer (to encourage greater secondary spending on food/beverage/merchandising) by providing quality furniture. The use of pool side lounges, tables, chairs, umbrellas, has allowed families to stay close to the water areas in relative comfort.

(v) Food/Beverage/Merchandising

This area has seen some major changes through development of pool side and dry area multi serving zones. Linked to these are high quality wet and dry lounge zones where people are encouraged to sit down and relax.

A number of innovative centres provide extensive lounge areas as well as pool side furniture. These centres use mobile food and beverage carts to sell items directly to centre users (i.e. they take the product to the customer). A number of other centres visited have used merchandising innovations, such as all existing customers having to go through the sales area. Other innovations included:

Multi-media video screens through the centre reminding customers about programs, special promotions, and food/beverage and merchandising specials.

Providing customers with discount vouchers (at entry to centre) to spend in food/ beverage and merchandising outlets or on their next visit.

Offering combination sales specials to attract a higher spend per person.

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This paper provides background information on nine (9) sites that have been identified as potential locations for the Yarra Valley Aquatic and Leisure Centre. Based on similar aquatic and leisure centre developments across Australia a site of between 7,500 m² and 9,000m² for a new facility. The final site size and layout will be subject to the facility components and final design. The nine sites include

Don Road Reserve

Current site of Queens Park Outdoor Pool

Queens Park Sports Oval

Healesville High School – existing Jack Holt Indoor Pool site

Timber Mill Site

Old Tractor Site

Hardware site

Railway Park / Apex Park

13 Lilydale Road, Healesville

Details of each of the sites is provided in Appendix A Council Officers from the following areas along with the project consultant visited each site and assessed the site against the following set of 18 site criteria in order to determine the most appropriate location for a future integrate aquatic and leisure centre.

Recreation Services

Parks and Facilities

Social and Community Development

Major Building Projects

Environment

Urban Design

Civil Development

5.1 Site Criteria

Of all main success factors for high use leisure and recreation facilities (based on industry trends) the following three are regarded as primary site selection criteria:

Size of site for proposed development

Highly visible site

Suitable Topography to minimise development costs

5 Site Options and Assessment

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There are also ranges of secondary supporting site selection criteria that include:

Planning/Zoning

Site Services

Site Access and Traffic and Impacts

Site Geology

Value of site

Location to catchment population

Neighbourhood Effects

Image/Compatible use of site

Potential of part or total land sale

Commercial potential of site

Future facility expansion opportunities

Capital costs of site development

Environmental Impact

Place Impact

People Impact

People Impact

5.1.1 Primary Selection Criteria

1. Size of the site to fit the development

Is the site of sufficient size to enable the efficient development of the required facility?

2. Visibility of site

Position of site to major traffic zones and ability of site to present high visibility facilities.

3. Suitable Topography

The site should be relatively flat, have suitable stable soil conditions and be able to be protected from floods, high water table and not have a previous landfill or fill site history.

5.1.2 Secondary Selection Criteria

4. Planning/Zoning

Capability of site to meet all current and proposed planning requirements.

5. Site Services

Are services available on site or closely located to minimise cost and to ensure facility can be serviced?

Electrical Water Gas Sewer Storm water

6. Site Access

Site Access and Traffic Impacts: Most site visitors (80% to 90%) will come by car so there needs to be adequate site access and provision of appropriate car parking, bus parking and group drop off and pick up.

7. Site Geology

Site geology affects overall design and construction costs. A flat site with good soil conditions and no history of rubbish deposits or poor drainage is essential.

8. Value of site

Cost to either purchase or create the development on the site can be compared to determine the likely development impost at each site.

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9. Location to Catchment Population Central location to maximise use and how close it caters for the current and projected project area population (Primary and Secondary catchment zones).

10. Neighbourhood Effects Identify any negative neighbourhood impacts likely to occur from the development in relation to surrounding neighbourhood i.e. noise, traffic, lighting and amenity. 11. Image/compatibility of Site Does site image complement the proposed development? (i.e. visual aesthetics/environmental issues). 12. Potential of Part Land Sale or Lease Does the site have extra area suitable for sale/lease to assist with development/funding opportunities?

13. Commercial Potential of Site

Is the site commercially attractive to other funding parties or commercial investors?

14. Future Facility Expansion Capability Future Redevelopment and Facility Expansion Opportunities: Does the site have surrounding available land for future facility expansion?

15. Capital Cost of Development

Which site provides the project with the lowest development capital cost?

16. Environmental Impact

Impact the development has on the local environment

17. Place Contributes to the productivity and sustainability of the local area through improved economy, community, diversity, connection and sustainability) 18. People Contributes to the wide engagement of people together in one place through being walkable, safe, vibrant and welcoming.

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5.2 Site Assessment

The following table provides a summary of the combined average scores for each site.

Table 5.1 Site Assessment Score Sheet

CRITERIA Don Road Reserve

Queens Park Existing

Queens Park- Alternative

Healesville High School

Timber Mill Site

Old Tractor Site

Hardware Site

Railway Park /Apex Park

Lilydale Road Site

1. Size of site to fit development 3 2 3 2 5 1 3 2 4

2. Visibility of site 2 4 4 2 2 2 5 3 3 3. Site Topography 4 4 5 4 3 3 3 4 5 4. Planning/Zoning 4 3 5 2 1 2 3 3 3 5. Site Services a) Electrical b) Water c) Gas d) Sewer e) Storm water

2 3 5 4 2 2 2 2 2

6. Site Access and Traffic impacts

3 2 3 2 3 2 4 3 4

7. Site Geology 3 3 3 3 1 2 3 2 3 8. Value of Site 3 4 4 2 2 2 3 3 1 9. Location to Catchment

Population 2 5 5 2 3 3 4 3 3

10. Neighbourhood Effects 3 4 3 3 1 3 3 2 5 11 Image/ Compatible use of Site

4 4 4 3 2 3 3 2 5

12. Potential of Part Land Sale or Lease

3 3 4 2 4 1 3 2 4

13. Commercial Potential of Site 2 2 2 1 4 3 3 1 4

14. Future Facility Expansion Capability

3 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3

15. Capital Cost of Development 4 3 4 2 3 1 2 2 3 16 Environmental impacts 3 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 4

17 Place – contribution to the local area 3 3 4 2 1 1 2 2 4

18 People - contributes to the wide engagement of people 3 4 4 2 2 4 3 4

TOTAL SITE SELECTION CRITERIA SCORE

54 56 65 42 40 36 55 43 64

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Based on the combined assessment the sites reviewed were scored as follows

Queens Park Sports Oval 65

13 Lilydale Road, Healesville 64

Queens Park Outdoor Pool 56

Hardware site 55

Don Road Reserve 54

Railway Park / Apex Park 43

Healesville High School 42

Timber Mill Site 40

Old Tractor Site 36

The top three sites identified were Queens Park oval area, 13 Lilydale Road and the existing site of the outdoor pool. Queens Park – this site is currently a large open space area catering for a range of structured and unstructured sporting and leisure facilities and opportunities and community facilities. Many residents are familiar with this site as the “home” of the aquatic centre and identified it as a priority though the consultation process. The development of an integrated aquatic and leisure facility would be compatible with the existing use The site is centrally located to the Healesville Township however does not have main road access or visibility due to the entrance being off Don Road. The site has also been designated as a Neighbourhood Safer Place (NSP) The current site of the outdoor pool is not large enough to fit the required aquatic and leisure facility structure and associated car park without impacting on other open space areas. There are a large number of environmental issues associated with the Park and the Graceburn Creek including the identification of the area as a platypus conservatory. As a result any development would need to be sympathetic to these issues and the required setbacks would need to be applied. 13 Lilydale Road, Healesville – This site scored the second highest through the assessment. The site is a good size and profile and is well located to the Healesville Township. The development of an aquatic and leisure facility would complement the existing uses of the site including the railway and play spaces. The site would have limited impact on other users or residents. Council however does not own the site, which will impact on the capital cost of the project as the site would need to be either purchased or leased. A detailed geotechnical review and site survey would be required to determine the capacity of the site for the development of an integrated aquatic and leisure centre.

5.2.1 Summary of Key Findings

An extensive assessment of the nine sites in the Healesville area was completed by an interdepartmental team of Council Officers. The assessment indicated that there was no one site the met all of the identified criteria for the location of an aquatic and leisure Centre. The Queens Park site however met the majority of the criteria and was rated the preferred site for further review and consideration. The site provides a central location with ease of access for the majority of residents. The footprint for an integrated aquatic and leisure Centre however is larger than the current outdoor pool site and therefore may impact on the open space within the Park. The planning of any facility also needs to be mindful of the significant environmental issues around the Park including the Graceburn Creek and its inhabitants.

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This section covers future facility priorities identified from the operational, market research and consultation reviews completed and summarised in sections one to five of this report. The facility priorities and associated facility development directions have then been interpreted into a notional proposed development brief to address the current and future aquatic and leisure facility needs of residents in the Healesville and the Yarra Valley area.

6.1 Future Strategy Direction

The Study’s market research, consultation and aquatic trend reviews indicate that there are a number of localised trends in relation to the future Yarra Valley Aquatic and Leisure facility usage and aquatic activity participation. These include the following broad trends that will impact on the future aquatic strategy for the area:

The Yarra Valley area is currently serviced by aged and outdated indoor and outdoor aquatic facilities. Technical reviews of both facilities indicate the need to provide significant funding (up to $3m for the outdoor pool) to bring the facilities up to standard without improving the usage or range of services and programs offered.

Discussions with the Healesville High School representatives indicate that the cost of operating the indoor pool is becoming unsustainable for the school, particularly as it is not core business and is outside of the schools facility entitlements. The pools is currently being subsidised by Council, the school and the Rotary Club of Healesville.

Discussion with local residents indicate that the outdoor pool plays a very important role as a community “meeting place” particularly for young people. The heritage of the site also sees the area used for many years by the indigenous community as a local meeting place. The development of a community aquatic and leisure facility on the site is therefore in keeping with the heritage and current use of the facilities.

Participation in aquatic activities is highly valued by residents with 56% of the population currently making use of aquatic and leisure facilities and 75% of the population wishing to either make use or make greater use of facilities in the future.

Future demand will be affected by the demographics of the area with a large number of people 54.5% in their most active years (0 to 45 years) and also a large representation 23% of people aged 60 + years. This results in the need to provide a balance provision of services and facilities to meet the needs of these key target groups

The usage of the outdoor pool is relatively low when compared to other similar outdoor facilities that are attracting between 10,000 and 30,000 visits per summer season.

Market research and consultation findings indicate the centre is a local use facility attracting users from a 5 to 10km radius. The key features identified by residents to encourage either use in the future or greater use were:

o Longer opening hours 25%

o Warm water pool 23%

o Cleaner more hygienic facilities 18%

o Improved outdoor areas 10%

6 Recommended Strategic Direction

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o More indoor program pools 7%

o Indoor competition pool 5%

o Improved social area/cafe 5%

o More variety of activities and programs 4%

There is strong support to expand aquatic facilities and provide a range of dry health and wellness facilities and extend the aquatic features to further encourage the family/social recreation and therapy users by developing additional leisure water spaces that interact with both the indoor and outdoor facilities.

6.1.1 Yarra Valley Aquatic Facilities Direction

The market research and consultation findings indicate that the current aquatic facilities are at the end of their useful life. There is a need to develop a new integrated aquatic and leisure centre that is centrally located to meet current and future community expectation and need. The Vision for the Centre is to: Create a vibrant and attractive high quality aquatic and leisure Centre and community hub that provides spaces for people to enjoy and participate in active and passive recreation, community learning, well-being, recreation and socialising. The site review undertake as part of this project have identified that the Queens Park site or the Lilydale Road site were the best locations for further investigation as part of the concept plan development. The consultation processes has identified the opportunity to create a sporting, leisure and aquatic precinct that caters for a range of diverse indoor and outdoor activities and opportunities using both the adjacent sporting fields at Queens Park or the Railway and play space at Lilydale Road and a newly developed aquatic and leisure facility. These trends along with the key consultation findings indicate the need to ensure the development of a facility that:

Provides for a range of formal and programmable water to support lap and fitness swimming, school programs and carnivals and local swimming clubs training and competition.

Encourages greater family/child entries by providing a range of indoor and outdoor leisure water, play and fun water features and some interactive water.

Provides a range of dry health and wellness facilities including the gymnasium and multipurpose program rooms to enable the health and fitness market to continue to increase and assist with improving the financial viability of the Centre. This should include the development of health suits for allied health professions such as massage therapists, physiotherapists and nutritionists to support the primary use of the aquatic and health and fitness programs. Discussions with the local Community Health Services indicate that are in support of decentralised programs operating potentially from an integrated centre.

Develops additional flexible aquatic programming opportunities through the development of a new dedicated program pool capable of servicing the aquatic education programs and warm water therapy based programs and services to meet the needs of the young and ageing population.

Develop a range of group change room facilities and family/disabled change rooms off the pool deck and a separate school change areas to improve the customer comfort and access to change facilities.

Provide an efficient front of house/reception area and staff amenities to support operational efficiencies and customer service.

Develop a multipurpose/training/ education/birthday party room that can service a range of community groups and organisations.

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Considers opportunities to integrate the environmental characteristics of the area and celebrates the heritage of the site as a “meeting place”. This could include the interpretation aspects built into the entire design of the facility and education about the environmental imperatives of the site.

Develop car parking to cater for both the current and future increased usage of the Centre.

6.1.2 Development Objectives and Principals

Council’s objectives in connection with developing the Aquatic and Leisure Centre are to:

Provide significant leisure opportunities to meet the current and future needs and expectations of residents, meeting both the recreational and training needs of swimmers, and fitness participants as well as encouraging aspiring swimmers to take part.

Ensuring a quality Centre that will create opportunities for young people, women and people with special needs to become more active participants.

Provide opportunities to contribute to the health and well-being of Yarra Ranges residents and visitors.

To provide for and encourage both water related and non-water related leisure and fitness activities for various ages, skill levels and abilities.

To encourage and foster community participation in the planning, development, management and evaluation of Centre programs and services.

To provide a broad range of recreational opportunities for residents of all ages by meeting changing community needs.

To provide opportunities for families to participate in leisure activities together.

To ensure the facility is maintained as an attractive Centre in good working order (including the grounds).

To ensure the Centre co-operates with Council’s other recreational facilities, local business and the community to promote the interest of Council.

Through participation in leisure activities a greater sense of community consecutiveness amongst the residents of Yarra Ranges will develop The design principals should ensure the creation an environment that reflects the qualities and development themes of the Yarra Ranges Council in projecting a positive future direction including:

The Architecture should be visually exciting and stimulating with cultural contemporary design but at the same time be sensitive to the heritage of the area and the environmental characteristics of both the preferred sites and the Healesville area.

The building should be high quality and be easily identifiable to first time visitors to the Yarra Ranges area.

The building should internally and externally, provide a feeling of excitement and invitation to the community to enter.

The Centre should be a community focal point providing a greater diversity of benefits such as:

o Adventure

o Fun / Excitement

o Escape

o Social Experience

o Entertainment

o Participation

o Education

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o Lifestyle Enhancement

o Health and Fitness

The Centre should utilise natural light to create a strong inside-outside relationship.

The Centre should incorporate passive and active energy efficiency.

The Centre should use materials of an environmentally sustainable nature.

6.1.3 Why Should Council Provide Aquatic and Leisure Facilities?

One of the things often not clearly articulated is why Council’s provide these large aquatic and leisure facilities.

In many circumstances it is treated as a given that Council will provide pools with LGA’s right across the state having established memorial outdoor pools back in the 1950’s and 1960’s. These pools had limited life spans and have been progressively replaced over the years with community expectation high that an indoor facility will be built.

Others will argue that there are private providers in the market place and that Council could support these businesses to meet community needs. It is true that there are commercial learn to swim facilities and also commercial gyms. These facilities do play an important role. They are smaller and purpose built on a business model. They don’t provide the full range of opportunities in the Council operated facilities nor do they support community service obligations. (i.e. target disadvantaged communities or address the identified health outcomes)

One of the most significant reasons for the provision of large-scale facilities it to address community health and well-being. As documented in this paper there are significant health issues facing our community and the provision of these facilities by Council, in partnership with a range of other recreation opportunities (e.g. sports fields, trail networks, stadiums, footpaths) is critical to having healthy, active and engaged communities and increasing physical participation and community connectedness.

Council facilities can specifically target the community to address health and well-being issues. Major facilities can partner with Allied Health providers including Yarra Valley Community Health and Inspiro to support programs and activities that will meet health and well-being goals. Due to the high capital and operating cost of providing these facilities these are not facilities traditionally being provided by the private sector.

6.2 Option One Master Plan

Based on the community consultation and key findings of the study a master plan for the proposed Yarra Valley Aquatic and Leisure Centre has been completed. The table on the following page details the priority facility components that have been established to guide the Master Plan. The table details:

Facility Components

Target Markets

Facility Objectives

Functional Relationships

Other Features to Consider

Area Schedules

Independent Quantity Surveyors Trevor Main completed independent construction cost analysis for the Yarra Ranges Aquatic and Leisure Centre Master Plan. In summary the indicative capital cost of the option one master plan is $26,507,803.

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The capital cost for option one was significantly higher than anticipated when compared to similar recently developed facilities. The main reason for the higher cost is associated with the level of design and proposed materials that were identified to address many of the environmental and site sensitive issues related to the preferred site. These items included:

Design approach response to the site and its context.

Treatments to reduce light spillage.

High use of glazing to maximize the views.

Two storey development to minimize site impacts i.e. Graceburn, sporting oval and open space and maximize views over the mountains

Use of locally sourced and recycled materials to address ESD initiatives and ensure the facility would integrate with the natural environment of Healesville.

Additional screening to reduce light spillage impact on Graceburn Creek and platypus conservatory.

Integration of kindergarten and childcare to rationalise built infrastructure on the site.

Tree preservation across the site.

Due to the high capital cost the Project Team reviewed the scope of works and developed revised facility component schedules that would meet the majority of community need and would provide a “better fit” with Councils financial capacity. Accordingly the component scope was reduced to provide two further options. Option Two: $20.5M Option Three: $15M The following provides a summary of each option Master Plan Development option 1 ($30M) This option is the ideal. It considers the full range of site issues, provides a desirable level of service that meets community demand and offers a high quality facility with premium design. This option includes an integrated kindergarten and childcare area. Development option 2 ($20M) This options provides a reduced level of service, however maintains the functionality that meets community demand. The facility offers a quality facility with basic design. This option does not include the kindergarten and childcare area but does include a crèche to service the centre. Development option 3 ($15M) This option offers a further reduced level of service and prioritises facility components to those for family/ social recreation and health. This results in a facility without a 25m pool, a reduced leisure pool and warm water program pool with a very basic design. This option does not include the kindergarten, childcare or crèche. Appendix Two of this report provides detailed quantity surveyors reports for each option. The following tables provide a comparison of the key facility components for each option.

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Table 6.1 Option Component Comparison

Facility Components Option 1 Master Plan

Option Two Option Three

Formal Pool 25 metre pool

Reduced by 2 lanes to 6 lanes Deleted

Program Pool

Reduced by 10m²

Leisure Pool

Reduced by 39m²

Reduced by 37m²

Spectator seating Deleted

Weights room

Reduced by 59m²

Reduced by 35m²

Group fitness

Reduced by 127m²

Reduced by 132m²

Health & Fitness Change

Reduced by 81m²

Reduced by 89m²

Upper deck Deleted Deleted

Kindergarten/Childcare Deleted Deleted

Crèche Increased by 24m²

Deleted

Consulting suites

Reduced by 102m²

Reduced by 102m²

First Aid

Reduced by 3m²

Reduced by 2m²

Sauna Deleted Deleted

Group change rooms Deleted Deleted

Family change rooms Increased by 16m²

Reduced by 20m²

Table 6.2 Option Component Area Comparison

Facility Components Option 1 Master Plan Option Two Option Three

Formal Pool 25 metre pool 25m x 8 lanes 25m x 6 lanes Not included

Program Pool 16m x 10m 116m x 10m 15m x 10m

Leisure Pool 277 m² 238 m² 240 m²

Program Pool Amen 19 m² 19 m² 19 m² Spectator seating 31 m² 31 m² Not included

Weights room 592 m² 533 m² 557 m² Group fitness 402 m² 275 m² 270 m² Health & Fitness Change 105 m² 24 m² 16 m² Upper deck 112 m² Not included Not included

Kindergarten/Childcare 140 m² Not included Not included

Crèche 100 m² 124 m² Not included

Consulting suites 114 m² 12 m² 12 m² First Aid 17 m²2 14 m² 15 m² Sauna 20 m² Not included Not included

Group change rooms 104 m² Not included Not included

Family change rooms 57 m² 73 m² 37 m² Administration area 147 m² 140 m² 100 m² Reception 57 m² 33 m² 26 m² Café 111 m² 100 m² 100 m² Dry Lounge 93 m² 87 m² 38m² Store 29 m² 50 m² 35 m² Pool Office 20 m² 18 m² 18 m²

Concourse Showers 10m² 10m² Not included

Male / Female Change 156 m² 156 m² 156 m² Plant 300 m² 300 m² 300 m² Car parking 134 spaces 134 spaces 134 spaces

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Table 6.3 Proposed Yarra Ranges Aquatic and Leisure Centre Component Schedule

ACTIVITY AREA

FACILITY COMPONENTS

TARGET MARKETS FACILITY OBJECTIVES AREA SCHEDULES TOTAL AREA

(m2)

INDOOR AQUATIC HALL

Indoor 25 m x 8 lane pool with ramp access

Leisure activities Social groups Entertainment Education Programs Infants Families

Indoor formal water to support all year access for lap swimming, learn to swim and school events

Ramp access Easy access to male and female change rooms Identify future outdoor splash park linked to indoor

leisure water.

Pool – 25m x 8 lanes Wet Deck – 0.5m around pool edge Concourse – 3.5m sides, 4.0m ends Water depth 1.2m to 1.8m

TBAm2

Leisure pool/program linked to outdoor splash park

Leisure activities Social groups Entertainment Education Programs Infants Families

Provide a free form leisure pool with interactive water features to attract families, children and visitors to the area

Provide broad leisure experiences Straight edges on 2 sides to enable area to be

used as program pool for low level learn to swim Beach entry access

Beach entry/free form water 190m2 Straight edges on two sides to enable area to be

programmed for learn to swim Toddlers Pool 60m2 Concourse average 3m around pool area. Consider inclusion of small water slide that does not

require additional staffing

750m2

Warm water program pool and spa area at end of pool

Therapy Learn to swim Sports recovery

Provide warm water pool to support hydrotherapy based activities and lower level learn to swim

Ramp access\ Spas at end of pool Accessible changes located within close proximity Environment to support relaxation and therapy

activities.

Warm water pool 10m x 16m = 160m2

160m2

Steam room/Sauna Older adults Social Therapy Sports recovery Non-organised leisure

Provide hot water pool, steam room and dry sauna for social / relaxation and therapy

Visibility clear for staff Disability access into spa considered

Spa – 35m² Sauna – 20m

2 steam

Visibility clear for staff Consider disability access into spa

55m2

Other support facilities - Storage - First aid room - Aquatic office - Wet lounge - Plant rooms

Service areas To service aquatic areas To be located in close proximity to pool hall.

Storage – 60m² First aid – 15m² Pool office – 20m² Wet lounge – 100m² Circulation allow 10% Plant – 200m2

TBAm2

Subtotal Indoor Aquatic Hall TBAm²

Health and Fitness

Weights Room Health and fitness Therapy Competition / clubs Industry training Health and fitness Wellness Events/social Industry training

Area of suitable size to cater for cardio, free weights and pin loaded machines

Area for future expansion Capitalise on views over Graceburn Creek and

Queens Park

Weights room 500m2 Fitness testing room 20m2 Office 20m2

540m²

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ACTIVITY AREA

FACILITY COMPONENTS

TARGET MARKETS FACILITY OBJECTIVES AREA SCHEDULES TOTAL AREA

(m2)

Program Room Health and fitness Therapy Competition / clubs Industry training Health and fitness Wellness Events/social Industry training

Area to support group fitness activities Two Group fitness room 200m2 consider opportunity to divide room into to two separate rooms with operable door.

Storage 40m2

440m²

Subtotal Health and Fitness 780m²

Dry Facilities

Crèche / Multi-Purpose Room expansion

Families Children Non-organised leisure Social groups

Expand childcare area Provide floor space to cater for up to 40 child

placements Provide external play area Meets all Child care regulations

Floor area – 110m2

Toilets – 15m2

Store – 30m2

Office – 15m2

Consider traffic flow, access and fee payment

170m2

Consulting Rooms Health and fitness Therapy Clubs Sports recovery

Provide a commercial lease zone that allows health professional services to be based at the centre.

Alternative revenue source. Supports program pool users.

Floor area – 120m2

Reception/waiting – 20m2

Wash facilities within consulting rooms

140m2

Subtotal Dry Facilities 130m²

Front of House Areas

Foyer / Reception / Merchandising revamp

All customers Provide welcoming entry area that allows users to relax and socialise before entering central areas.

Improve electronic member’s entry systems to reduce overcrowding at reception.

Provide efficient access to aquatic areas, health and wellness areas.

Reception area linked to administration area. Area to display merchandise

TBAm2

Food and Beverage All customers and staff

To provide cafe and area for social interaction Consider external access to cafe area Provide direct access to aquatic and health and

fitness areas.

Cafe and lounge 100m2 100m2

Offices / Administration / Staff Rooms

Centre staff Provide staff and centre administration area

Managers office 20m2 Work area – area for up to 4 work stations 40m² Storage – 40m² Staff room – 40m²

140m2

Subtotal Front of House TBAm²

Amenities Change rooms and Amenities

All customers Provide integrate wet and dry change room area. Consider separation of wet and dry users

Male change rooms 80m2 Female change rooms 80m2 Accessible change rooms located within close

proximity to warm water pool.

100m2

Family Change room extension

Families People with disabilities Older adults Special needs groups

Provide range of family/disabled amenities 4 cubicles @ 15m² Located close to leisure water and warm water pool

60m2

School change area School groups Events

Provide separate male and female school change room only area

Minimal Shower / Toilet provision. Fully accessible.

Male – 50m² Female – 50m²

100m²

Pool deck showers All customers Provide access for on course showering Area required for 2 shower heads for pool deck showering 10m2

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ACTIVITY AREA

FACILITY COMPONENTS

TARGET MARKETS FACILITY OBJECTIVES AREA SCHEDULES TOTAL AREA

(m2)

Subtotal Amenities m²

Other Areas

Dry Plant room NA NA Allowance 200m2

Cleaners Room / Store

NA NA Allowance 30m2

General Circulation Allowance (10%)

NA NA Allowance 220m2

Subtotal Other Areas

450m2

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6.2.1 Option One - $26M - $30M

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6.2.2 Option Two - $20M

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6.2.3 Option Three - $15M

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This section provides a summary of business and financial models for the potential redevelopment of the Yarra Valley Aquatic and Leisure Centre. The proposed redeveloped facilities will see the current outdoor pool area at Queens Park transformed to create multipurpose facility that meets the current and future leisure and aquatic needs of residents based on the extensive market research and consultation completed during the feasibility study. This section covers the following areas:

Projected Funding Strategy

Financial Models Global Impacts

Business and demand assumptions

Business performance summaries

Ten Year Financial models

This report should be read in association with the financial model spread sheets listed in Appendix Four of this report.

7.1 Project Funding Strategy

A key aim of the development is to enable capital funding to be shared between Council funding and State and Federal Government Grants. The high capital cost will see the need for a number of funding support grants as Council does not have the financial capacity to totally fund such a major development. The above capital cost allowances are based on a construction completion by 2015.

7.2 Financial Models Global Impacts

This section provides a summary of key business assumptions that have been included in the 10 year business plan for the proposed development of the Yarra Ranges Aquatic and Leisure Centre

7.3 Facility Areas Covered in Business Model

The financial modeling has been completed on Option Two as it is seen as the more achievable facility development option. The proposed new facility will incorporate the following main activity and development spaces:

25 metre x 6 lane pool with ramp access

Program pool.

Leisure pool.

Spa – including fully accessible spa

7 Financial Operational Model

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Sauna

Male/Female/Accessible/Family change – wet and dry

Weights room/Gym

Group fitness room x 2

Social areas with food and beverage to the pool hall and Queens Park

Separate school entry and group change area

Integrated occasional care facilities

Front of house and administration area

7.4 Key Business and Operational Assumptions

This section provides a summary of key business assumptions that have been included in the 10 - year business plan for the proposed Yarra Ranges Aquatic and Leisure Centre. The figures have been based on industry benchmarks and existing usage patterns of Council facilities i.e. the outdoor pool and school indoor pool. The figures have also been reviewed against CERM data Industry benchmarks provided by the University of South Australia.

7.4.1 Operating hours

The base case financial model uses the following core business hours for management and staff rosters:

Monday to Friday: 5.30am to 10pm

Saturdays/Sundays 8am to 7pm

Staffing rosters allow for duty managers to staff the centre from 30 minutes before and after opening hours so this sees 100 hours per week staff time.

7.4.2 Entry fees

The following table highlights the entry fees used for the base case financial model with the first year of entry programmed for 201562017. Fees and charges exclude GST. Table 7.1 Proposed Yarra Ranges Aquatic and Leisure Centre Proposed Year One Entry Fees (2016/2017)

Activity Area Entry Fee

Fee Excludes GST

Indoor Leisure and Program Pools

Adult casual $6.00

Child casual $4.00

Concession casual $4.00

Family Pass – 2 adults/2 children $17.00

Swim/Spa/Sauna $6.00

Spectator - Adult $2.50

Schools entry $3.50

Aquatics Events Indoor pool - half day total 25 m pool $500.00

Aquatic Learn to swim class $14.00

Programs Aquareobics class $13.00

Therapy/rehabilitation $13.00

Birthday Parties (per child includes food) min 10 children

$20.00

Crèche Childcare/hour $6.00

Health and Fitness Group Fitness $10.00 - 12.80

Weights casual $15.00

Concession casual $9.00

Memberships Health Club Membership per month $62.00

Aquatic only $35.00

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7.4.3 Management and Staffing Structure and Salary Rates

A generic management and staffing structure has been used to calculate staffing numbers and costs. A summary for each option of key staffing positions and allocations by Equivalent Full Time (EFT) positions against average salary is listed in Appendix Four

All salaries used in the model are based on average Victorian industry awards from a range of metropolitan aquatic and leisure centres. Salaries are impacted by CPI annually.

7.4.4 Food and Beverage/Merchandising

The current financial performance of the food and beverage and merchandise areas has been used as the base for this model. Food and beverage is then calculated on a percentage spend by the numbers of users that visit the centre.

7.4.5 Insurance

The model includes an allowance for both public liability insurance and building insurance.

7.4.6 Utilities

A 15% increases on existing utility allowances have been made to address the impact of the increased cost of power.

7.4.7 Building and Plant Depreciation

The financial models are set up for operational budgets and do not include full development cost allowances. Building and Plant depreciation have not been allowed for in these financial models. This would be identified in a more detailed business planning stage once plans and plant and equipment were more defined. Industry trends indicate that aquatic leisure centres usually require a capital improvement investment about every 5 years to ensure they are presented at a high standard. The high use of facilities and very corrosive atmosphere requires such investment. To compensate for this the financial model allows for a capital investment of $350,000 every 5 years. This is recorded below the operational performance bottom line.

7.4.8 Capital Loan Repayments

The financial models do not assume or include any capital financing costs. These details could be added to a more detailed financial model once a financing strategy was identified.

7.5 Global Impact Assumptions

The base case financial model has included the following global impacts across the 10-year business model based on all components being open in 2016/17 as the first year of business.

Please note starts up costs pre-opening allowances are included in the base case model. These costs include implementation of pre-opening sales and marketing program and some start up staff costs. The main business impact assumptions include:

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CPI Increases: Assumes on average 2% yr. 2 to 10 with 1.5% extra increases every 3 years for salary increase upgrades. Business Growth: Assumes year 3 is base year at 100% and year 2 is discounted by 2% to 98% of year 3 and year 1 is discounted by 5% to 95% of year 3. This takes account for the business development required with the provision of a new aquatic and leisure facility in the Healesville area.

Real Price Growth: Assumes 1.0% price increases from year 2 to year 10.

Expenditure Increases: Assumes annual expenditure increase of C.P.I as indicated.

Salary On Costs: Assumes annual on costs of 15% on all salaries.

Salary Increases: Allows for annual increases in line with CPI.

Pre-Opening Expenses: A total of $100,000 in pre-opening expenses is included to cover the long development stage. This figure is amortised over the first 3 years of the model.

Asset management and Replacement Allowances: No allowances have been made for asset management and renewals in the 10 year operating budgets at this stage but once final building finishes and plant selected these would need to be calculated to provide a full development cost.

7.6 Usage projections

Centre usage is broken up into casual, program and membership use. Usage growth is based on global inputs of demand with allowances for new business establishment and then business consolidation.

7.7 Financial Models

A 10-year financial model has been developed for the master plan. It should be noted that the performance is based on activity areas and associated usage, revenue, expenditure and net operating performance.

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7.7.1 Base Case Financial Model

The 10-year business projections are detailed in the following table. Table 7.2 Base Case 10 Year Operational Business Projections

CATEGORY Y E A R S AVERAGE PER

ANNUM 1

($000) 2

($000) 3

($000) 4

($000) 5

($000) 6

($000) 7

($000) 8

($000) 9

($000) 10

($000)

Revenue $1,938 $2,071 $2,173 $2,258 $2,369 $2,461 $2,557 $2,632 $2,684 $2,735 $2.388

Expenditure $2,275 $2,347 $2,395 $2,377 $2,449 $2,500 $2,552 $2,626 $2,677 $2,729 $2.493

Long Term Maintenance Allowance

$350 $350 $70

Net Profit/ (Loss)

($337) ($275) ($222) ($118) ($430) ($39) $5 $6 $6 ($344) ($175)

VISITS 289 298 303 305 307 310 312 310 307 305

305,000 visits

Note: Does not include development costs such as depreciation, capital cost repayments, land tax, Council rates.

The 10-year base case business projections indicate:

Revenue is expected to increase annually ranging from $1.938M in year 1 to $2.735M by year 10.

Expenditure is expected to increase annually ranging from $2.275M in year 1 to $2.729M in year 10.

The Centre is expected to operate at an annual operating deficit from years one to year six. In years seven to nine the Centre will operate at a surplus. The average operating deficit over the 10-year period is estimated to be approximately ($174,000) per annum.

Centre attendances are expected to gradually increase each year from 289,000 in year 1 to 305,000 by year 10.

7.8 Business Case Scenario Comparisons

The tables on the following page provide a 10-year impact comparison for the following different business scenarios:

Optimistic Case - 10% more use than the base case

Conservative Case - 10% less use than the base case

7.8.1 Optimistic Case

Table 7.3 Optimistic Case 10 Year Operational Business Projections – 10% More Use

CATEGORY Y E A R S AVERAGE PER

ANNUM 1

($000) 2

($000) 3

($000) 4

($000) 5

($000) 6

($000) 7

($000) 8

($000) 9

($000) 10

($000)

Revenue $2,131 $2,278 $2,390 $2,484 $2,606 $2,707 $2,813 $2,896 $2,952 $3,009 $2.611

Expenditure $2,298 $2,371 $2,421 $2,403 $2,477 $2,528 $2,581 $2,656 $2,707 $2,759 $2.509

Long Term Maintenance Allowance

$350 $350 $70

Net Profit/ (Loss) ($167) ($93) ($30) $81 ($221) $179 $232 $239 $245 ($101) $32

Visits 312 321 326 329 332 334 337 334 332 329

329,000

Visits

Note: Does not include development costs such as depreciation, capital cost repayments, land tax, Council rates.

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The 10-year optimistic case business projections indicate:

Revenue is expected to increase annually ranging from $2.131M in year 1 to $3.009M by year 10.

Expenditure is expected to increase annually ranging from $2.298M in year 1 to $2.759M in year 10.

The Centre is expected to operate at an annual operating surplus from years one to year 10. The average operating surplus over the 10-year period is estimated to be approximately $32,000 per annum.

Centre attendances are expected to gradually increase each year from 312,000 in year 1 to 329,000 by year 10.

7.8.2 Conservative Case

Table 7.4 Conservative Case 10 Year Operational Business Projections – 10% Less Use

CATEGORY Y E A R S AVERAGE PER

ANNUM 1

($000) 2

($000) 3

($000) 4

($000) 5

($000) 6

($000) 7

($000) 8

($000) 9

($000) 10

($000)

Revenue $1,759 $1,879 $1,971 $2,048 $2,148 $2,232 $2,318 $2,387 $2,433 $2,480 $2.165

Expenditure $2,262 $2,332 $2,380 $2,361 $2,433 $2,483 $2,535 $2,609 $2,660 $2,711 $2.477

Long Term Maintenance Allowance

$350 $350 $70

Net Profit/ (Loss) ($503) ($453) ($409) ($313) ($635) ($252) ($216) ($221) ($227) ($582) ($381)

Visits

267 275 279 281 283 285 287 285 283 281 281,000

visits

Note: Does not include development costs such as depreciation, capital cost repayments, land tax, Council rates.

The 10-year conservative case business projections indicate:

Revenue is expected to increase annually ranging from $1.759M in year 1 to $2.480M by year 10.

Expenditure is expected to increase annually ranging from $2.262M in year 1 to $2.711M in year 10.

The Centre is expected to operate at an annual operating deficit from years one to year ten. The average operating surplus over the 10-year period is estimated to be approximately ($381,000) per annum.

Centre attendances are expected to gradually increase each year from 267,000 in year 1 to 281,000 by year 10.

7.8.3 Facility Business Scenario Comparison

The Business scenario facility comparisons indicate the following ranges of operational performance based on:

10% more use

Base Case – Average predicted use

10% less use

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Table 7.5 Facility Business Scenario Comparison

CATEGORY Scenario Comparisons Scenario Comparisons Scenario Comparisons

Optimistic Case 10% More Use Average Net Profit/(Loss)

Over 10 years

Base Case (Average Use) Average Net Profit/(Loss)

Over 10 years

Conservative Case 10% Less Use Average Net Profit/(Loss)

Over 10 years

Average Income $2.611 $2.388 $2.165

Average Expenditure $2.509 $2.493 $2.477

Long Term Maintenance Allowance (every 5 years)

$70 $70 $70

Average Operating Surplus

$32 ($175) ($381)

329,000

Visits 305,000 visits

281,000 visits

7.8.4 Financial Performance Summary

The financial performance summary indicates that:

Revenue is expected to range from an average of approximately $2.156M to $2.611M.

Expenditure is expected to range from an average of approximately $2.509M to $2.477M.

The Centre is expected to operate between a deficit or approximately $381,000 per annum through to an operational surplus of approximately $32,000 per annum. This will be determined by the management structure and programming of the facility.

The Centre will attract between 280,000 visits and 330,000 visits per annum. This will again be impacted by the type and level of programming offered.

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Appendix One: Site Assessment

1 Queens Park – Current Site for Healesville Outdoor Pool

Address: 5/36 Don Road, Healesville

Mel Ref: 278 D1

Crown Land – Council as Committee of Management

Description Queens Parks Reserve is a district social recreation park that provides for sport, social recreation and play. The park has sports fields and a formal landscape setting that adjoins remnant bushland that follows the Grace Burn, a significant platypus habitat and biodiversity corridor through Healesville. (Yarra Ranges Council, Queens Park Draft Master Plan – September 2012) The Healesville Outdoor pool facility provides a 50m outdoor pool cold water pool, learner and toddler pools, kiosk and lawn area.

Planning information Property number 250942

Area (m²) 5622.51

Planning Zone PUBLIC PARK & RECREATION RESERVE

Planning Overlay LSIO-Land Subject to Inundation, HO163-Queens Park & Nook (639)

Abutting Road Zone ROAD ZONE (CATEGORY 1)

Urban Growth Area Inside the Urban Growth Boundary

Planning Scheme Amendment No None

Proposed Zone/Overlay None

Neighbourhood Character Precinct None

Former Shire Healesville

Ward RYRIE

Area of Cultural Heritage Sensitivity Yes

Property within 500m of Extractive Industry Zone

No

Activity Centre Policy Precincts Doesn't apply

Regional Strategy Policy Area Township A

Residential Policy Rural Township

Key site opportunities and constraints The current footprint for the existing facility is inadequate to site a new aquatic and leisure centre. If a new facility was to be constructed here the footprint would need to be increased which has implications for the current layout of the reserve. The 30m buffer zone along the Grace Burn currently runs through the toddler pools. Run off from any new development would also need to be managed due to the close proximity to the buffer zone. This would include hard surfaces (i.e. car park). Under the Yarra Ranges planning scheme the site has been identified as land subject to inundation. (refer to appendix 1) There is also a heritage overlay for The Nook and The Nook Monument. (refer to appendix 2) Advantages/Disadvantages The community and stakeholder engagement clearly identifies this site as an important meeting place for the Healesville community, and in particular, young people and the indigenous community. There is significant support for a new leisure facility being built on this site.

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2 Queens Parks Sports Oval

Address 1/36 Don Road, Healesville Mel Ref: 278 E1 Crown Land – Council as Committee of Management

Description

Queens Parks Reserve is a district social recreation parks that provide for sport, social recreation and play. The park has sports fields and a formal landscape setting that adjoins remnant bushland that follows the Grace Burn, a significant platypus habitat and biodiversity corridor through Healesville. (Yarra Ranges Council, Queens Park Master Plan – September 2012) The sports oval is used for football and cricket and is home to the Healesville Junior Football Club during the winter season and by the Healesville Cricket Club in summer. Other facilities include cricket practice nets, lighting and sports pavilion. (upgraded in 2008) The oval is recognised as a Neighbourhood Safer Place.

Planning information

Property number 205061

Area (m²) 128006.73

Planning Zone BUSINESS 3, PUBLIC PARK & RECREATION RESERVE

Planning Overlay HO159-Streetscape & Trees (303), LSIO-Land Subject to Inundation, HO163-Queens Park & Nook (639)

Abutting Road Zone ROAD ZONE (CATEGORY 1)

Urban Growth Area Inside the Urban Growth Boundary

Neighbourhood Character Precinct None

Former Shire Healesville

Ward RYRIE

Area of Cultural Heritage Sensitivity Yes

Property within 500m of Extractive Industry Zone

No

Activity Centre Policy Precincts Doesn't apply

Regional Strategy Policy Area Township A

Residential Policy Rural Township

Key site opportunities and constraints

This is the best location on the reserve to locate an Aquatic and Leisure Facility. It is not covered by the Land Subject to Inundation overlay (refer to appendix 1). It also has sufficient distance from the 30m buffer zone for the Grace Burn.

Advantages/Disadvantages

The master plan for Queens Park has recently been completed. It would need to be reviewed to accommodate this new development which may result in some community backlash. Council would need to relocate the Senior Cricket Club and Junior Football Clubs to Don Road Sporting Complex. There would be a possible shortfall in playing surfaces for cricket, with consideration needing to be given to the soccer pitches for this purpose. Healesville Cricket Club is one of the larger cricket clubs in the valley with 5 senior and 6 junior teams, a total of 160 payers. Don Road currently is home to the Healesville Senior Football Club and Healesville District Soccer Club.

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3 Queens Park Soccer Pitch

Address: 1/36 Don Road, Healesville Mel Ref: 278 E1 Crown Land – Council as Committee of Management

Description

Queens Park Reserve is a district social recreation parks that provide for sport, social recreation and play. The park has sports fields and a formal landscape setting that adjoins remnant bushland that follows the Grace Burn, a significant platypus habitat and biodiversity corridor through Healesville. (Yarra Ranges Council, Queens Park Master Plan – September 2012) The soccer pitch and small pavilion is used for soccer training and social soccer by the Healesville Soccer Club (summer only) and by the dog obedience club.

Planning information

Property number 205061

Area (m²) 128006.73

Planning Zone BUSINESS 3, PUBLIC PARK & RECREATION RESERVE

Planning Overlay HO159-Streetscape & Trees (303), LSIO-Land Subject to Inundation, HO163-Queens Park & Nook (639)

Abutting Road Zone ROAD ZONE (CATEGORY 1)

Urban Growth Area Inside the Urban Growth Boundary

Neighbourhood Character Precinct None

Former Shire Healesville

Ward RYRIE

Area of Cultural Heritage Sensitivity Yes

Property within 500m of Extractive Industry Zone

No

Activity Centre Policy Precincts Doesn't apply

Regional Strategy Policy Area Township A

Residential Policy Rural Township

Key site opportunities and constraints

The land abuts the Don Road drain which flows into Grace Burn. A 30m buffer zone would be a consideration for any development which potentially restricts the size and amenity of any new facility. Provision for a summer competition for soccer would need to be considered as would a winter training venue.

Advantages/Disadvantages

The site is located within Queens Park and the community have expressed a strong view that they would like a Leisure Centre located here. It is central to the retail precinct and close to public transport. Relocating soccer might illicit some community backlash, particularly if there is difficulty in providing suitable alternative facilities. It may also involve a cost to Council to provide such facilities.

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4 Don Road Sporting Complex

Address: 249 – 263 Don Road, Healesville Mel Ref: 278 H5 Council owned

Description

This reserve is predominately an active sports reserve with large open space areas and some remnant bushland. The reserve comprises a senior oval, 2 soccer pitches, pavilion, small change room/ kiosk, 2 netball courts, pony club/clubrooms, greyhound club and racing track, playground/ outdoor gym, 4 tennis courts, helipad and dam. (Don Road Draft Master plan 2012)

Planning information

Property number 247584

Area (m²) 287321.64

Planning Zone PUBLIC USE Zone 6 (LOCAL GOVT)

Planning Overlay None

Abutting Road Zone ROAD ZONE (CATEGORY 1)

Urban Growth Area Outside the Urban Growth Boundary

Planning Scheme Amendment No None

Proposed Zone/Overlay None

Neighbourhood Character Precinct None

Former Shire Healesville

Ward RYRIE

Area of Cultural Heritage Sensitivity None Recorded

Property within 500m of Extractive Industry Zone No

Activity Centre Policy Precincts Doesn't apply

Regional Strategy Policy Area Rural 2

Residential Policy None

Key site opportunities and constraints

The tennis courts are used as overflow only, with the main tennis courts located at Queens Park. This site has strong potential for the development of an Aquatic Centre.

Advantages/Disadvantages

Don Road is viewed as being some distance from town by the community and the reserve is poorly serviced by public transport and pedestrian/cycling access. The reserve has more than sufficient space to construct a facility with supporting infrastructure however this is likely to be at the expense of the overflow tennis courts.

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5 Timber Mill Site

17-25 Maroondah Highway Healesville Mel Ref: 278 A5 Privately owned

Description

This site has a visually prominent highway frontage location and has attracted some development interest. This gently sloping parcel of approximately 3.37 hectares is mostly cleared and vacant. A stand of indigenous trees is located along sections of the Maroondah Highway frontage. There has been some community concern about the visual impact of future industrial development on this site. (Review of Industrial Areas in Yarra Ranges 18 September 2009)

Planning information

Property number 203555

Area (m²) 33620.81

Planning Zone INDUSTRIAL 3

Planning Overlay DDO3-Design and Development

Abutting Road Zone ROAD ZONE (CATEGORY 1)

Urban Growth Area Inside the Urban Growth Boundary

Planning Scheme Amendment No None

Proposed Zone/Overlay None

Neighbourhood Character Precinct None

Former Shire Healesville

Ward RYRIE

Area of Cultural Heritage Sensitivity None Recorded

Property within 500m of Extractive Industry Zone No

Activity Centre Policy Precincts Doesn't apply

Residential Policy Rural Township

Key site opportunities and constraints

The site is subject to a contamination report. This would need to be reviewed to determine the actions and costs involved to decontaminate the site. From a Strategic Planning perspective a pool development on this site would not be the highest priority, an industrial development is more likely to gain support.

Advantages/Disadvantages

The site does hold prominence at the entry to the Healesville Township. It is a more than adequate sized site to locate an aquatic and leisure facility and is within reasonable distance for residents and the broader community.

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6 “Old Tractor Site”

Address: 38 Don Road, Healesville Mel Ref: 278 E2 Privately owned

Description

This site is located immediately adjacent to Queens Parks Reserve. It is believed to have been a VicRoads depot and is currently privately owned.

Planning information

Property number 205090

Area (m²) 2728.33

Planning Zone RESIDENTIAL 1

Planning Overlay EAO-Environmental Audit

Abutting Road Zone ROAD ZONE (CATEGORY 1)

Urban Growth Area Inside the Urban Growth Boundary

Planning Scheme Amendment No

C97

Proposed Zone/Overlay Proposed (Overlay SLO 23-Significant Landscape 23) - amendment C97, Proposed (Zone R3Z-Residential 3) - amendment C97, Proposed (Overlay DDO 7-Design and Development 7) - amendment C97

Neighbourhood Character Precinct

None

Former Shire Healesville

Ward RYRIE

Area of Cultural Heritage Sensitivity

None Recorded

Property within 500m of Extractive Industry Zone

No

Activity Centre Policy Precincts

Doesn't apply

Regional Strategy Policy Area

Township A

Residential Policy Rural Township

Key site opportunities and constraints

The land is not currently on the market, this would require further investigation together with an estimated purchase price. The land is Zoned Residential 1 so a planning permit would be required to construct an Aquatic and Leisure Centre. The site falls within the Planning Scheme Amendment C97 which has been adopted by Council and is with the Minister for approval. There is also an indication of site contamination which would require further investigation.

Advantages/Disadvantages

The site is insufficient in size to locate a proposed Aquatic and Leisure Facility. Further investigation would be required to see if the adjacent Queens Park land could be utilised to provide the additional space required. This is potentially difficult due to the close proximity to the Don Road drain.

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7 Railway Park / Apex Park

Address: 10 Healesville-Kinglake Road, Healesville Mel Ref: 278 A1 Owned by the State Government

Description

This site is currently contains the Healesville Labyrinth and Heritage Railway group. There is a community playground with supporting infrastructure. Part of the land abutting the area is privately owned and contains a number of aged care units. The Healesville Railway station complex was constructed for the Victorian Railways in 1902 by F. E. Shillabeer, on the Lilydale Healesville Line. The complex consists of a large timber gable roofed station building with extensive passenger waiting facilities, intact toilets and cantilevered verandahs to the platform and roadside waiting areas. (VHR, 1567) Other associated structures include a timber lamp room, a corrugated iron clad goods shed, circular water tower and a turntable. The line has been closed since 1980, and the station building is currently being leased. While the station buildings are in poor condition and in urgent need of repair, they remain intact. (Beeston, 1995) (VHR, 1567)

Planning information

Property number 202523

Area (m²) 65876.74

Planning Zone PUBLIC USE Zone 4 (TRANSPORT)

Planning Overlay HO2-Healesville Railway Station Healesville, LSIO-Land Subject to Inundation

Abutting Road Zone ROAD ZONE (CATEGORY 1)

Urban Growth Area Inside the Urban Growth Boundary

Neighbourhood Character Precinct None

Former Shire Healesville

Ward RYRIE

Area of Cultural Heritage Sensitivity Yes

Property within 500m of Extractive Industry Zone

No

Activity Centre Policy Precincts Doesn't apply

Regional Strategy Policy Area Rural 2, Township A

Residential Policy Rural Township

Key site opportunities and constraints

Healesville Railway Station Complex is historically significant as an important and intact example of a railway station designed to cater specifically for peak holiday traffic. The station site generally reflects the development of the Healesville Township as a tourist destination in the first half of the twentieth century. It also has historical associations with the timber industry, the construction of Maroondah dam and the steam railway era. (Coleman, 1997) (VHR, 1567) Healesville Railway Station is architecturally significant as an early and unique example of Edwardian timber station design. It was among the first stations to have cantilevered verandas and possibly the earliest surviving timber example. (VHR, 1567) The water tower, turntable, goods shed and the sub-structure of the engine shed contribute substantially to the architectural significance of the site, as a representative example of a steam locomotive sub-depot. (Coleman, 1997) (VHR, 1567)

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The land is also subject to a land swap with the State Government with various parcels within the site earmarked to come into Council ownership. This could make the development of a large facility on this site more complex as Council would be working on its own land as well as VicTrack land.

Advantages/Disadvantages

The available land on site might be too narrow to accommodate an Aquatic Facility. A significant portion of the site is also subject to flooding.

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8 Healesville High School – Jack Hort Memorial Pool

Address: 10 Camerons Road, Healesville Mel Ref: 270 F10 Owned by the Education Department

Description

This facility is located and owned by State Government. It comprises a 25m indoor heated pool with eight (8) lanes plus a small play pool, change facilities, office, first aid and kiosk. The facility was funded by the Community with funding also provided by State Government and Council. The pool is currently gaining some financial support from the Healesville Rotary Club and other sponsors a range of individuals and organisations.

Planning Information

Property number 204933

Area (m²) 54232.81

Planning Zone PUBLIC USE Zone 2 (EDUCATION)

Planning Overlay None

Abutting Road Zone None

Urban Growth Area Inside the Urban Growth Boundary

Planning Scheme Amendment No None

Proposed Zone/Overlay None

Neighbourhood Character Precinct None

Former Shire Healesville

Ward RYRIE

Area of Cultural Heritage Sensitivity None Recorded

Property within 500m of Extractive Industry Zone No

Activity Centre Policy Precincts Doesn't apply

Regional Strategy Policy Area Township B

Residential Policy Rural Township

Key site opportunities and constraints

The existing indoor pool is located on this site however it is at the end of its useable life span. There would be potential to locate a new Aquatic and Leisure facility at this venue provided that the School supported such a development. This is in accordance with the planning scheme zoning. Preliminary discussions have indicated that the school have alterative plans for this site.

Advantage/Disadvantages

The existing facility is well known and supported by the Healesville Community. Joint use agreements can however be problematic and the costs associated with venue operations would need to be actively resolved.

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9 13 Lilydale Road, Healesville

Address: 13 Lilydale Road, Healesville Mel Ref: 278 A1 Owned by McKenzie’s Buses

Description

McKenzie’s bus lines operate their depot from a portion of this site and are keen to get a new tenant on the other portion. The site is located opposite the Healesville Labyrinth and playground.

Planning Information

Property number 204004

Area (m²) 18209.74

Planning Zone INDUSTRIAL 1

Planning Overlay None

Abutting Road Zone ROAD ZONE (CATEGORY 1)

Urban Growth Area Inside the Urban Growth Boundary

Planning Scheme Amendment No None

Proposed Zone/Overlay None

Neighbourhood Character Precinct None

Former Shire Healesville

Ward RYRIE

Area of Cultural Heritage Sensitivity Yes

Property within 500m of Extractive Industry Zone No

Activity Centre Policy Precincts Doesn't apply

Regional Strategy Policy Area Township A

Residential Policy Rural Township

Key site opportunities and constraints

Under its current Planning Zone a permit would be required to develop a recreation centre.

Advantage/Disadvantages

It is likely that the land would only be available to lease which would not be acceptable for the development of a Council facility.

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10 Corner River and Church Street

Address: 175 Maroondah Highway Healesville Mel Ref: 278 B1 Privately Owned

Description

This site is in the prime retail area of Healesville and has been subject to development negotiations that currently have fallen through. Council owns, or will own, the land immediately adjacent to the site along the River Street Frontage. This is subject to the finalisation of a land swap with the State Government.

Planning Information

Property number 203639

Area (m²) 3409.32

Planning Zone BUSINESS 4, PUBLIC USE Zone 4 (TRANSPORT)

Planning Overlay LSIO-Land Subject to Inundation

Abutting Road Zone ROAD ZONE (CATEGORY 1)

Urban Growth Area Inside the Urban Growth Boundary

Planning Scheme Amendment No None

Proposed Zone/Overlay None

Neighbourhood Character Precinct None

Former Shire Healesville

Ward RYRIE

Area of Cultural Heritage Sensitivity Yes

Property within 500m of Extractive Industry Zone No

Activity Centre Policy Precincts Doesn't apply

Regional Strategy Policy Area Township A

Residential Policy Rural Township

Key site opportunities and constraints

Under its current Planning Zone a permit would be required to develop a recreation centre. The land is also subject to inundation from the nearby Watts Creek. The site is long and narrow and would require the Council land abutting it.

Advantage/Disadvantages

The site would need to be purchased and is likely to cost somewhere in the vicinity of $60 - $100 per square metre.

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Appendix Two: Quantity Surveyors Report

Option One Master Plan - Cost Plan

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Option Two - Cost Plan

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Option Three - Cost Plan

Yarra Valley Aquatic & Leisure Centre

Feasibility Study

Indicative Assessment of Probable Cost - $15M Option

QS REF: Q1314207

Date: 26/05/2014

Function area rate cost

m2 $/m2 $

Ground Floor

Reception / Administration / Meeting Rooms 126 2,200$ 277,200$

Café 100 2,600$ 260,000$

Cafe equipment Allow 35,000$

Pool office 18 2,200$ 39,600$

Pool Hall 1027 2,100$ 2,156,700$

Store 35 1,500$ 52,500$

Plant 206 1,800$ 370,800$

Family Change, Male and Female Change / Amenities 217 2,600$ 564,200$

Accessible amenities and change 36 3,000$ 108,000$

First Aid 15 2,400$ 36,000$

Consult Room 12 2,200$ 26,400$

Circulation 383 1,800$ 689,400$

Gym Stores 50 1,500$ 75,000$

Gym / Dry Fitness 509 2,200$ 1,119,800$

Fitness test room / office 18 2,200$ 39,600$

Program rooms 250 2,000$ 500,000$

Wall grossing areas 60 1,200$ 72,000$

Plant on Mezzanine 92 1,200$ 110,400$

Entry Canopy Allow 100,000$

Total Building Works 3,154 2,103$ 6,632,600$

Pool

Program Pool 272 1,285,000$

Leisure pool 240 1,200,000$

Preliminaries associated with Pool costs Allow 248,500$

Total Pool Works 2,733,500$

Demolition

Bitumen paving / carpark Allow 30,000$

Existing Change room pavilion 199 120$ 23,880$

Existing concrete paving Allow 47,000$

Existing 25m pool Allow 41,000$

Existing smaller pools Allow 11,000$

Existing plant room Allow 10,000$

Remove existing water tanks Allow 3,000$

Total Demolition 165,880$

Subtotal Construction 9,531,980$

External Works & Services

Clear site / general demolition Allow 254,000$

Outdoor Decking Allow 230,000$

New Carpark Allow 633,000$

Adjustment and make good existing bitumen driveway Allow 153,000$

New paving Allow 143,000$

Proprietary screen Allow 70,000$

Works to realign the existing oval Allow 100,000$

Landscaping Allow 144,000$

Allowance for external services Allow 474,000$

Total External Works & Services 2,201,000$

Construction Cost 11,732,980$

ESD initiatives 2% 235,000$

Design Contingency 5% 599,000$

Construction Contingency 8% 1,006,000$

Sub Total 1,840,000$

Professional Fee Allowance (No Project Manager) 8% 1,086,000$

Substation contribution allowance allow 100,000$

Authority Fees & Charges allow 118,000$

Sub Total 1,304,000$

Total Project Costs 14,876,980$

Exclusions:

GST Cost Escalation beyond March 2014

Stage 2 works - 25m Pool and associated building works plus Group Change

Upgrade Authority Service Infrastructure incl. substation Leased gym and other equipment

Land, legal, marketing and finance costs Diversion / Relocation of existing in ground services

Relocation / Decanting Costs Loose Furniture & Equipment

Staging Costs Asbestos & other hazardous materials removal

Adverse soil conditions incl rock excavation, contamination

Pool Equipment incl blankets, anti-drowning software Internal Council Costs

Office and Active IT equipment incl telephone, computers Public Art

Future outdoor leisure area and equipment

Outdoor Play

Waterplay equipment (eg Whitewater West Ap-250)

Works to existing amenities block, pavilion, skate park, tennis

courts, tennis clubhouse, tennis carpark, and reserve

L:\Pr o j ec t s\ Q1314207\140514 co st p l an \15M ay 2014-y ar r a r an g es aq u at ic .x lsx

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Appendix Three: Key Stakeholders (i) External Stakeholders

Organisation Name Contact Person

Melbourne Water

Healesville Indigenous Community Service (HISCA)

Doseena Fergie Fiona Mawson Stephanie Grubb

Yarra Valley Community Health Jane Judd Richard Flannigan

DPCD – Community Engagement Alana Marsh

Principal - Secondary School NB President elect Rotary

George Perini - Principle Allan Rennick – Vice Principle Ross – Pool Manager

Friends of the Indoor Pool Ross Illsey

Rotary Club Pamela Gates

Lions Club Bert Bresser

Healesville Swimming Club Mark Melville

Healesville Inter Church Community Care (HICCI)

Kerri Goding

Healesville Environment Watch Maureen Bond

Yarra Glen Living and Learning Karen Fothergill

Healesville Living and Learning Centre

Janet Goodwin

Steels Creek Community Centre Mike Watkins

Toolangi District Community House

Rivendell Merran Macs

Golden Wattle Club Luisa Williams

Senior Citizens x2

Oonah Healesville Ann Jenkins

Healesville Action Group John Anwin

Community 3777 Kath Holton

Yarra Glen and District Township Group

Dean Putting

YMCA (Provider of Indigenous and AAA program in Yarra Ranges)

Julie Hanman (Indigenous) Jacinda Eldrich (AAA)

Warrawa Lois Peeler

Healesville Salvos Sarah Eldridge

U3A Terry Green Don McDonald

Probus Healesville

RSL Healesville Brian Luscombe

Young Leaders Program Simon Williams

RSL Yarra Glen Ted Bowling

Healesville Chamber Bruce Argyle

YG Chamber Rod Faulkner

Kinder Link (Healesville) Jacinta Graham

Yarra Glen Kinder

Toy Library x2

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(ii) Internal Stakeholders

Council Internal Stakeholders Contact Person

Yarra Ranges Council Parks and Facilities Manager Grant Jack

Communications Troy Edwards

Major Projects and Urban Design Julie Scott and Robyn Mansfield

Civil Development Doug Dickins and Geoff Davis

Environment David Harper and Marty White

Parks and Bushland Brad Martin and Gaye Gadsden

Family/ Children/ Aged/ Youth/ Disability Guy Masters and Leanne Tilley

Economic and Community Development Ali Wastie, Simon O’Callaghan and Isha Scott

Arts and Culture Greg Box Lisa Whitehouse (& Recreation)

Planning Damian Closs (Strategic) and Jacquie Hansen (Statutory)

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Appendix Four: Financial Models

Base Case Financial Model

YEAR

2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027

Income by area

Blank $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Aquatic area $1,176,704 $1,262,782 $1,327,467 $1,381,232 $1,451,123 $1,509,603 $1,570,292 $1,617,867 $1,650,545 $1,683,721

Weights rooms $86,450 $92,774 $97,526 $101,476 $106,611 $110,907 $115,366 $118,861 $121,262 $123,699

Health & Fitness Programs $131,416 $141,018 $148,228 $154,219 $162,009 $168,524 $175,285 $180,581 $184,213 $187,901

General Memberships $321,100 $344,589 $362,240 $376,912 $395,984 $411,942 $428,503 $441,485 $450,402 $459,455

Support facilities $101,198 $107,381 $111,276 $114,392 $118,742 $122,053 $125,449 $128,229 $129,790 $131,363

Crèche $74,813 $79,490 $82,735 $85,233 $88,660 $91,319 $94,050 $95,940 $96,909 $97,878

Sundry income $46,800 $43,054 $43,915 $44,793 $46,137 $47,060 $48,001 $49,441 $50,430 $51,439

$1,938,481 $2,071,087 $2,173,388 $2,258,259 $2,369,265 $2,461,409 $2,556,946 $2,632,405 $2,683,552 $2,735,456

Expenditure by area

Aquatic area $1,509,928 $1,557,357 $1,589,954 $1,622,492 $1,671,928 $1,706,143 $1,741,058 $1,792,474 $1,827,491 $1,863,192

Weights rooms $189,694 $195,385 $199,292 $203,278 $209,376 $213,564 $217,835 $224,370 $228,858 $233,435

Health & Fitness Programs $123,270 $127,426 $130,286 $133,051 $137,206 $140,117 $143,089 $147,207 $149,972 $152,789

General Memberships $37,250 $38,368 $39,135 $39,918 $41,115 $41,937 $42,776 $44,059 $44,941 $45,839

Support facilities $89,024 $93,920 $97,034 $99,605 $103,242 $105,969 $108,764 $111,331 $112,848 $114,381

Crèche $195,780 $201,653 $205,686 $209,800 $216,094 $220,416 $224,824 $231,569 $236,201 $240,925

Sundry income $2,700 $2,781 $2,837 $2,893 $2,980 $3,040 $3,101 $3,194 $3,257 $3,323

$2,147,646 $2,216,890 $2,264,224 $2,311,037 $2,381,942 $2,431,186 $2,481,447 $2,554,204 $2,603,568 $2,653,884

Undistributed overheads $61,119 $62,952 $64,211 $65,495 $67,460 $68,810 $70,186 $72,291 $73,737 $75,212

Amortisation of pre-opening expenses $66,667 $66,667 $66,667 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Total expenditure $2,275,432 $2,346,509 $2,395,102 $2,376,532 $2,449,402 $2,499,996 $2,551,633 $2,626,495 $2,677,305 $2,729,096

Projected operating performance ($336,951) ($275,422) ($221,714) ($118,273) ($80,137) ($38,587) $5,313 $5,909 $6,247 $6,360

Depreciation/capital costs

Long Term Maintenance Allowance (every 5 years) $0 $0 $0 $0 $350,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $350,000

Building, Plant and equipment depreciation allowance $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Council rates and land tax allowance $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Finance repayment allowance $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Total depreciation/capital costs $0 $0 $0 $0 $350,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $350,000

Projected centre performance ($336,951) ($275,422) ($221,714) ($118,273) ($430,137) ($38,587) $5,313 $5,909 $6,247 ($343,640)

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