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June 13, 2014 Issue of the HealthCare Provider
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$ 4. 95 Presorted Standard U.S. Postage Paid Syracuse, N.Y. Permit # 568 The Central New York Business Journal 269 West Jefferson Street Syracuse, NY 13202 HealthCare Upstate, St. Joseph’s implement electronic medical-record systems. Danlee Medical Products hopes to grow e-commerce sales. Page 3. Health-Care People-on-the- Move news Page 9. The List: Radiological Diagnostic- Imaging Facilities Page 6, 8. INSIDE June 13, 2014 Business Journal News Network Business Journal News Network NEW SYSTEMS NEW SYSTEMS Terry Wagner, Upstate Medical’s chief information officer, center, is pictured with Dan Malay, left, and Laurie Roberts, right, of Upstate’s information management and technology department. All three oversaw the hospital’s launch of an electronic-medical records system. STORY, PAGE 4
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Page 1: 061314 hcp flip

$4.95

Presorted StandardU.S. Postage Paid

Syracuse, N.Y.Permit # 568

The Central New York Business Journal269 West Jefferson StreetSyracuse, NY 13202

HealthCare

Upstate, St. Joseph’s implement electronic

medical-record systems.$495

Danlee Medical Products hopes to grow e-commerce sales. Page 3.

Health-Care People-on-the- Move newsPage 9.

The List: Radiological Diagnostic-Imaging Facilities Page 6, 8.

INSIDE

June 13, 2014

Business JournalNews Network

Business JournalN e w s N e t w o r k

Business JournalNews Network

Business JournalNews Network

Business JournalNews NetworkBusiness JournalNews Network

NEW SYSTEMS

NEW SYSTEMS

Terry Wagner, Upstate Medical’s chief information officer, center, is pictured with Dan Malay, left, and Laurie Roberts, right, of Upstate’s information management and technology department. All three oversaw the hospital’s launch of an electronic-medical records system.

STORY, PAGE 4

Page 2: 061314 hcp flip

Page 2 • HealthCare Provider June 13, 2014

WATERTOWN — The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has awarded the North Country Family Health Center, Inc. more than $732,000 in fed-eral funding.

The money will help the facil-ity provide primary health-care services for low-income families in Jefferson and Lewis counties.

That’s according to U.S. Senators Charles Schumer (D–N.Y.) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D–N.Y.),

who announced the funding in a news release.

The Health Resources and Service Administration within the HHS provided the funding, the lawmakers said.

The grant award enables the facility to

continue operations as a federally qualified health center, providing health care to all in need, Joey Marie Horton, executive direc-tor of the North Country Family Health Center, said in the news release.

“This critical funding will ensure that our organization can continue to meet the medical, mental health, and dental needs of our community. Additionally, the funding will allow us to continue to provide support-ive services to homeless individuals. In 2013, our health center cared for over 9,000 individuals who made over 36,000 visits for medical, mental health, and dental ser-vices. The vast majority of our patients are children who live below the federal-poverty guidelines,” Horton said.

The North Country Family Health Center has helped low-income families in Jefferson and Lewis counties receive primary care for 39 years, the lawmakers said.

Its services include preventive care, adult and pediatric primary care, dental care, and behavioral health. q

Contact Reinhardt at [email protected]

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SKANEATELES FALLS — Welch Allyn, Inc., a Skaneateles Falls–based manufactur-er of medical-diagnostic equipment, on June 3 an-nounced it has acquired certain assets of PediaVision Holdings, LLC, an Orlando–area–based developer of vision technology.

Welch Allyn didn’t release any financial terms of the acquisition in its news release.

PediaVision, founded in 2007 and headquartered in Lake Mary, Fla., invented “Spot,” described as a “new generation of user-friendly vision assessment technology,” ac-

cording to Welch Allyn.Spot is a binocular-vision screener with

wireless-communication capabilities de-signed to screen for refractive error, which can be associated with several ophthalmo-logical problems in patients of all ages.

The acquisition allows Welch Allyn to offer its customers a diagnostic device for conducting eye examinations, Stephen Meyer, Welch Allyn’s president and CEO, said in the news release.

It also “complements” the company’s ex-isting vision-screening technology, Meyer said. The company plans a launch of a Welch Allyn-branded version of Spot later this year.

“PediaVision has a solid customer base and the addition of its binocular-vision screener into our existing portfolio of physical-assessment products … will allow us to offer a more robust suite of early-de-

tection solutions for healthcare providers globally,” said Meyer.

PediaVision works to solve the “undiag-nosed” vision problems affecting millions of people globally. The PediaVision technology has “quickly captured the attention” of orga-nizations that spe-cialize in vision screening and vi-sion care, David Melnik, CEO of PediaVision, said in the news release.

“We are extremely proud of what we have been able to accomplish and are so thankful to our customers for their passion and support in helping us change the way vision issues are identified. PediaVision has done what its team is best at — delivering innovation that changes the way people solve problems and create value. I truly believe Welch Allyn is the perfect fit to take what PediaVision has built and take it to the

next level. Spot couldn’t be in better hands,” Melnik said.

Welch Allyn said it will retain PediaVision’s 16 employees under a transition-services agreement (or TSA) and the workers have been asked to remain with the company

in their current capacity through the transition pe-riod.

PediaVision’s existing manufacturing partners will con-tinue to develop and source the current product. As the transition continues, “it will be business as usual” for all PediaVision sup-pliers and customers, according to Welch Allyn.

Welch Allyn employs more than 2,600 people in 26 different countries, according to its news release. q

Contact Reinhardt at [email protected]

Welch Allyn acquires assets of Florida–based PediaVision

ERIC REINHARDTJOURNAL STAFF

HHS awards North Country Family Health Center $732,000 in fundingERIC

REINHARDTJOURNAL STAFF

Follow us on Twitter at

twitter.com/cnybj

Page 3: 061314 hcp flip

HealthCare Provider • Page 3June 13, 2014

DeWITT — Danlee Medical Products, Inc., a DeWitt–based provider of medical and cardiology supplies, is hoping to generate ad-ditional revenue growth through e-commerce as it moves into its third de-cade of operation.

Joni Walton, the company’s founder and sole owner, launched the business in July 1994. Danlee had previously been

the medical-supplies division of Diagnostic Medical Instruments (DMI) before another company purchased the firm.

Walton had worked as a customer-ser-vice representative for DMI, started the division, and when she learned it had plans to dissolve the division, she told the acquir-ing firm she’d buy the division.

Danlee sells supplies to more than 4,000 health-care professionals nationwide, she says. It operates in a 12,800-square-foot space in the Rodax Office Park at 6075 E. Molloy Road in DeWitt.

“We sell our products through e-com-merce. We sell through direct mail, tele-marketing. We don’t have any outside sales force. We do everything internally,” says Walton.

Danlee currently employs 14 people, including 13 full-time workers and one part-time employee, Walton says.

The firm launched its own website in the early 2000s. Danlee created the website to help consumers and potential clients become more aware of the company, ac-cording to Walton.

Its website “progressed” over time and generated more sales, and it became evi-dent that e-commerce is “the way every-thing is going,” she adds.

Danlee in 2013 redesigned its website in an effort to drive more traffic to the site and generate more online orders.

It also resulted in additional hiring for what Walton called a “marketing depart-ment,” including Laura Prattico, Danlee’s marketing director; John DeSantis, an e-commerce-marketing assistant; and an ad-ditional part-time employee.

“So, our focus this year is to grow our e-commerce portion of our sales,” Walton says.

Danlee hopes to increase its website sales by 40 percent in 2014, according to Prattico. Online sales accounted for “less than 10 percent” of the firm’s revenue in 2013, she adds. Walton projects overall revenue growth of 10 percent for Danlee

this year.“We’ve grown every single year since

we started the business, and I just see that progressing,” Walton says.

Danlee serves as a distributor for cli-ents such as Utica–based ConMed Corp., (NASDAQ: CNMD); Maplewood, Minn. –based 3M Co. (NYSE: MMM); Bellows Falls, Vt.–based Vermed, Inc.; and Dublin, Ireland–based Covidian Ltd. (NYSE: COV), according to Walton.

It also distributes products for paper and cable manufacturers.

“All the medical supplies you can think of that are normal in your doctor’s of-fices, like the gowns that [patients] wear, the table paper, gloves, Band-Aids, every-thing,” she says.

In the industry, Danlee competes with San Francisco, Calif.–based McKesson Corp. (NYSE: MCK). The DeWitt firm’s competitors also included Jacksonville, Fla.–based PSS World Medical, Inc. until McKesson Medical-Surgical acquired PSS World Medical in February 2013, accord-ing to the McKesson website.

Holter kits, FDA regulationBesides its role as a distributor, Danlee

also manufactures Holter heart-monitoring kits, which a doctor may prescribe if an electrocardiograph detects abnormalities in a patient’s heart, Walton says.

The physician applies electrodes to the patient who then resumes normal activity for a two-day period as the Holter kit moni-tors the person’s heart.

“Right now, we make over 400 different variations of [Holter and event-recording] kits,” Walton says.

Normal Holter, a biophysicist and Montana native, invented the Holter moni-tor.

DMI also manufactured Holter kits, which led to the division that Walton start-ed for the company, she says.

With its work in producing Holter kits, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers Danlee Medical Products a manufacturer and has regulated the busi-ness since the late 1990s, Walton says.

“We’re catergorized as a repacker, rela-beler within the FDA’s eyes,” she adds.

Some of the larger facilities for which Danlee makes the Holter kits want to know that the firm has “quality” processes in place, Walton says. The federal regulation also forced Danlee to become compliant “in all areas,” she adds.

Danlee became FDA certified about 15 years ago, she says. And it’s not the only certification that made Walton proud.

Women-owned certifiedThe Washington, D.C.–based Women’s

Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) on Aug. 8 of last year certified

Danlee Medical Products as a women’s business enterprise, or WBE.

WBENC is the “largest third-party certi-fier of businesses owned, controlled, and operated by women in the [U.S.],” accord-ing to its website.

WBENC, a national nonprofit, partners with 14 regional-partner organizations to provide its standard of certification to women-owned businesses throughout the country, the website says.

The certification helps Danlee as it pur-sues government contracts.

“So being able to put that certification on our website and on all of our market-ing materials, people actually seek out the woman-owned business for … some of their supplies,” Walton says.

Empire State Development’s Division of Minority and Women’s Business Development granted Danlee Medical a similar statewide certification about a de-cade ago, Walton says. q

Contact Reinhardt at [email protected]

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ERIC REINHARDTJOURNAL STAFF

Joni Walton, founder and sole owner of Danlee

Medical Products, Inc.

Page 4: 061314 hcp flip

Page 4 • HealthCare Provider June 13, 2014

SYRACUSE — Two Syracuse hospitals have launched electronic medical-re-cords (EMR) systems and a third has plans to imple-ment a system in 2015.

Upstate University Hospital and St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center partnered with Verona, Wis.–based Epic Systems as their EMR and practice-management ap-plication vendor.

Upstate University Hospital’s Downtown (Syracuse) Campus on March 1 became the first hospital in Central New York to

fully implement a secured, electronic medi-cal records (EMR) system, the hospital said in a news release.

Upstate on May 3 then launched the same set of applications at the Community campus, says Terry Wagner, chief informa-tion officer at Upstate University Hospital.

St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center on May 5 announced it launched SJLinked,

an electronic health-record (EHR) system across its entire system, including the hos-pital, clinics, and the primary-care offices of St. Joseph’s Physicians.

Crouse Hospital is planning to imple-ment the Soarian electronic medical-record system from Siemens. The work will begin this summer and conclude in 2015, the hospital said.

The federal government will penalize hospitals with a reduction in Medicare payments if they do not have technology in place for certified electronic health records by 2015, according to Upstate.

Upstate implementsEpic has a number of different modules.

It’s all one system, but there are many different subspecialty areas that Epic sup-ports, says Wagner.

“We had been using the system in all of our outpatient-clinic areas, so basically the doctor offices … and in our emergency de-partment downtown since 2012,” Wagner says.

She spoke with HealthCare Provider on June 9.

Upstate implemented the acute-care and billing applications for hospital purposes in

the March 1 launch, she adds.It included all of Upstate’s inpatient op-

erations, pharmacy, and operating room, Wagner says.

“Many, many different applications that we hadn’t been managing under Epic be-fore that,” she says.

Epic is a secure, paperless, digital and computerized-software system that inte-grates and maintains a patient’s medical profile. That medical history includes medi-cations, illnesses, records of doctor’s office or emergency-room visits, and insurance information.

The patient, along with their health-care providers, can access their medical records online from any location to review the indi-vidual’s medical profile.

So far, half of the U.S. population has a record in an Epic system, according to Upstate.

Administrative functions such as sched-uling, admitting, and patient billing are also handled on Epic.

Patients at Upstate’s Downtown Campus can access their records and create a free account with Upstate MyChart through Epic, says Wagner.

Upstate outpatients have had access to MyChart since 2012, she adds.

The secure, password-protected account is accessible “exclusively” to the patient at any time, the hospital said.

The information in MyChart is encrypt-ed and is not intended for urgent medical issues or to resolve health-related issues.

A patient should contact their provider di-rectly with those concerns, Upstate added.

SJLinked

SJLinked enables St. Joseph’s doctors and nurses to share test results, medication lists, physician notes, and other information across hospital units, ambulatory services, and in-transitions between care settings.

St. Joseph’s has used electronic records since 1999, but the system-wide EHR means all providers are on the “same screen, ensuring consistency and improving coor-dination of care,” the hospital said in a May 5 news release.

“The change to a single electronic-health record is an investment in our future, enhancing our ability to deliver patient-centered care that is seamless from the community physician’s office to the hospi-tal,” Kathryn Ruscitto, president and CEO of St. Joseph’s, said.

At the same time, the hospital also launched My St. Joseph’s, which it de-scribes as a “secure, online patient portal.”

It allows St. Joseph’s patients to access portions of their medical record, includ-ing their current medications, test results, immunizations, and allergies. They can also manage upcoming and past appoint-ments through a computer connected to the Internet or a smartphone.

St. Joseph’s also collaborated with Epic Systems to design SJLinked. Nearly 200 employees from various units worked with Epic for about 18 months to build and test the customized EHR platform, St. Joseph’s said.

A total of 50 certified trainers at the St. Joseph’s training center led more than 4,500 clinical staff through courses in prep-aration to use the system.

Epic Systems services 297 customers, with 19 live or installing in New York, St. Joseph’s said.

SJLinked will be interoperable with HealtheConnections, Central New York’s regional health-information organization, which shares electronic health-care infor-mation with participating health-care pro-viders in the community. q

Contact Reinhardt at [email protected]

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Upstate, St. Joseph’s implement electronic medical-records systems, Crouse to follow in 2015

ERIC REINHARDTJOURNAL STAFF

The staff of St. Joseph’s Physicians Family Medicine

works together on the new elec-tronic health-record system.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ST. JOSEPH’S HOSPITAL HEALTH CENTER

June 13, 2014

Reach us on the Web www.bizeventz.com

Page 5: 061314 hcp flip

HealthCare Provider • Page 5June 13, 2014

Hospitals and health sys-tems in Central New York and across Upstate are facing a shortage of doc-tors, especially primary care physicians, accord-ing to a report from the Healthcare Association of New York State (HANYS).

In the 2013 HANYS Physician Advocacy Survey, based on responses from health-care facilities across the state, excluding New York City, respondents reported a need for more than 1,000 physicians, of which 266 are primary care physicians.

From September 2012 to September 2013, the survey found that statewide, a total of 4,027 new doctors joined medical staffs while 4,093 physicians

left, resulting in a net loss of 66 physicians.In Central New York, 163 more physi-

cians retired or moved than began practic-ing here during the survey time period. This follows the loss of 109 physicians the region experienced in the previous year.

While Central New York had the highest net loss of physicians in the state, the region isn’t alone in this decline. The Buffalo area

lost 123 doctors, while the Rochester region lost 54, according to the report.

Statewide, 67 percent of respondents said that doctors are leaving their communities because of retirement. The difficulty to retain and recruit doctors to the region is another factor attributed to the shortage.

“Physician recruitment is an ongoing challenge,” Adam Ullman, director of phy-sician support services at Mohawk Valley Health System (MVHS), says in an email. “Changes in the health-care system, reim-bursement rates, and declining numbers of graduating physicians in certain special-ties add to a nationwide shortage in some specialties.”

Due to the shortage, hospitals have had to reduce or eliminate services or transfer patients to other facilities when emergency rooms are not covered by certain special-ists, HANYS says. In Central New York, 20 percent of hospital respondents reported having to eliminate or reduce services, and 52 percent indicated that their emergency rooms were not covered for certain special-ties.

Rural New York hospitals were nearly three times more likely to reduce or elimi-nate services, and twice as likely not to have their emergency rooms covered.

A recent brief by the SUNY Center for Health Workforce Studies also found that a large portion of physicians in rural counties plan to retire or reduce patient-care hours in the next 12 months than physicians in urban counties. The brief indicated that

Central New York has the highest per-centage of physicians planning to retire, while the Mohawk Valley had the highest percentage of doctors planning to reduce patient-care hours.

When Faxton St. Luke Healthcare and St. Elizabeth Medical Center formed MVHS earlier this year, Ullman says it was a positive step in attracting physicians. “Recruiting as a stronger, larger health-care organization rather than two smaller hospitals is a plus for our recruitment efforts,” says Ullman. Some specialty areas MVHS is currently recruiting for are primary care, neurosur-gery, orthopedics, and its Family Medicine Residency program.

“MVHS is fortunate that there are nu-merous academic institutions within a small radius for most physician specialties, as well as nurse practitioner and physician assistant programs, that give us exposure to provid-

ers entering the workforce,” says Ullman. To address the shortage, HANYS ad-

vocates for increased funding for Doctors Across New York (or DANY), a state-fund-ed initiative that helps hospitals and health systems recruit needed physicians. HANYS suggests bringing at least 250 new physi-cians to the under-served areas every year. Additionally, HANYS recommends expand-ed funding for the Primary Care Services Corps to incentivize nurse practitioners and physician assistants to practice in the region in exchange for loan repayment, as well as to make changes to eliminate the competi-tive procurement process of the program.

HANYS also pushes for the use of tele-health services, especially in rural commu-nities where some specialties are hard to find. q

Contact Collins at [email protected]

HANYS: CNY, Upstate regions face doctor shortage

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Physicians Wanted!All three regions of upstate New York saw a net loss of doctors last year.

Western NY 421 544 -123

Rochester* 525 579 -54

Central NY 552 715 -163

Northeastern 634 541 93

North Metro 791 773 18

Nassau/Suffolk 811 634 177

Gain Loss Net Loss/Gain

* NotE: Seneca and Chemung counties fall into the rochester region for HANYS’ survey, though those two counties are included in the 16 Central New York counties that The Central New York Business Journal covers.

Page 6: 061314 hcp flip

Page 6 • HealthCare Provider June 13, 2014

THE LISTResearch by Nicole Collins

[email protected] (315) 579-3911

Twitter: @cnybjresearch

ABOUT THE LISTInformation was provided by representatives of listed orga-nizations and their websites. Other groups may have been eligible but did not respond to our requests for informa-tion. While The Business Journal strives to print accurate information, it is not possible to independently verify all data submitted. We reserve the right to edit entries or delete categories for space considerations.

WHAT cOnSTITUTES THE cnY REgIOn?Central New York includes Broome, Cayuga, Chemung, Chenango, Cortland, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego, Seneca, St. Lawrence, Tioga, and Tompkins counties.

nEEd A cOpY Of A LIST?Electronic versions of all our lists, with additional fields of information and survey contacts, are available for purchase at our website, cnybj.com/ListsResearch.aspx

WAnT TO BE On THE LIST?If your company would like to be considered for next year’s list, or another list, please email [email protected]

RADIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSTIC-IMAGING FACILITIESRanked by No. of Radiological-Imaging Employees

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Menorah Park CEO receives prestigious national awardSYRACUSE — Mary Ellen Bloodgood, Menorah Park CEO, recently received the Association of Jewish Aging Services (AJAS) Dr. Herbert Shore Award of Honor.

“This most prestigious award is pre-sented to the outstanding executive profes-sional who, by his/her performance and contributions, best exemplifies the goals

and ideals of AJAS and service to Jewish older adults,” the AJAS web-site states. The candi-date had to serve in his/her role for more

than 10 years and continues to “demon-strate dedication, integrity, commitment, innovation, proven professional leadership and community involvement. The recipi-

ent is well respected, devoted and highly principled.”

Bloodgood was presented with the award at AJAS’s 54th annual conference in Jacksonville, Fla. The association honored her for her work developing Menorah Park from a stand-alone skilled nursing home into a full continuum-care campus.

Bloodgood oversees all the eldercare fa-cilities and affiliated programs at Menorah Park (www.menorahparkcny.com). Over the last 27 years, she has led the expansion of senior-care services and implemented many innovative initiatives, according to a Menorah Park news release.

Prior to becoming CEO, Bloodgood was chief operating officer and chief financial officer at Menorah Park.

Bloodgood also has served as treasurer of the AJAS “during very difficult financial and organizational times. Her keen fiscal skills were called upon daily as she helped steer our association to financial health,” the AJAS stated in a news release on its website. q

PHOtO COURtESY Of MEnORAH PARk

Menorah Park CEO Mary Ellen Bloodgood, center, receiving the Dr. Herbert Shore Award of Honor from Marty Goetz, CEO, Rivergarden, Jacksonville, Fla. and Carol Silver-Elliot, CEO, Cedar Village, Cincinnati, Ohio.

by jOurnal

staff

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ALL DAY EVERY BUSINESS DAY. Bookmark it.

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HealthCare Provider • Page 7June 13, 2014

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Page 8 • HealthCare Provider June 13, 2014

BINGHAMTON — The New York State Department of Health re-cently cer-

tified Good Shepherd Fairview Home as a pro-vider of enhanced assist-ed-living residential (EALR) services.

Good Shepherd Communities, the parent organization, announced the cer-tification in a news release distributed June 9.

The EALR certi-fication allows Good Shepherd Fairview Home to care for residents who exceed certain retention standards of adult homes, enriched housing programs, or assisted-living residences.

If a residence has an EALR certification, individuals can continue to live there, even if they need another person’s assistance to walk, transfer, climb or descend stairs, or operate medical equipment.

An EALR allows residents to delay, and in some cases, prevent having to seek nurs-ing home placement, the organization said.

Good Shepherd Fairview Home’s en-hanced assisted-living unit provides 35 beds

for residents.The facility

couldn’t provide the additional service “for many years,” Michael Keenan, president and CEO of Good Shepherd

Communities, said in the news release. “It meant families were faced with dif-

ficult decisions as they tried to decide their loved one’s next level of care. Now, we can provide additional services and increased nursing care,” Keenan said.

Good Shepherd Fairview Home, located at 80 Fairview Ave. in Binghamton, has been providing care for more than 140 years, the organization said.

A board of directors that includes com-munity representatives governs the home, while Good Shepherd maintains its ties to the Episcopal and Presbyterian churches.

It is open to people of all faiths. q

THE LISTResearch by Nicole Collins

[email protected] (315) 579-3911

Twitter: @cnybjresearch

ABOUT THE LISTInformation was provided by representatives of listed orga-nizations and their websites. Other groups may have been eligible but did not respond to our requests for informa-tion. While The Business Journal strives to print accurate information, it is not possible to independently verify all data submitted. We reserve the right to edit entries or delete categories for space considerations.

WHAT cOnSTITUTES THE cnY REgIOn?Central New York includes Broome, Cayuga, Chemung, Chenango, Cortland, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego, Seneca, St. Lawrence, Tioga, and Tompkins counties.

nEEd A cOpY Of A LIST?Electronic versions of all our lists, with additional fields of information and survey contacts, are available for purchase at our website, cnybj.com/ListsResearch.aspx

WAnT TO BE On THE LIST?If your company would like to be considered for next year’s list, or another list, please email [email protected]

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Page 10 • HealthCare Provider October 26, 2012

A New York City–based not-for-profit home health-care organization has received state approval to expand its Medicaid managed long-term care plan to 24 counties out-side of the city — includ-ing several in the Syracuse and Utica areas.

The Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY) is moving on plans to spread its VNSNY Choice Medicaid Managed Long Term Care plan to Herkimer, Madison, Oneida, and Onondaga counties. That’s after the state approved the market expan-sion in September.

The managed long-term care plan is tar-geted at seniors and individuals with chron-ic illnesses and disabil-ities who cannot live

independently at home, but do not want to move into a nursing home. It’s a voluntary option for Medicaid-eligible beneficiaries that provides nurse-care managers who visit members’ homes and coordinate the health-care services they receive.

News of VNSNY Choice’s expansion follows New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo ac-cepting recommendations from a Medicaid Redesign Team in February. The redesign lifted a moratorium on the extension of existing Medicaid managed-care plans, ac-cording to Christopher Palmieri, president of VNSNY Choice Health Plans, who also acted as an adviser to the state during its Medicaid redesign. VNSNY has been open

to the option of growing its service area since before that moratorium was lifted, he adds.

“We’ve been interested in expanding our service area since about 2003,” he says. “It was something that we’ve been working on for the entire year. We started our process to apply for market expansion in the early part of 2012.”

VNSNY Choice isn’t the only Medicaid managed long-term care plan that will be growing into Central New York and its sur-rounding areas. Fidelis Care, a Catholic health plan based in Rego Park in the New York City borough of Queens, announced in August it was expanding its Fidelis Care at Home managed long-term care program into 11 counties in and around Central New York.

Numerous plans have applied to the state for expansion, Palmieri says. VNSNY Choice wants to offer its plan to all eligible New York residents eventually, he contin-ues.

“Our organization felt that we should be offering our coordinated care through managed long-term care across the state,” Palmieri says. “[This] expansion was one step toward becoming a statewide health plan and serving all 62 counties in the state.”

MV/CNY expansionVNSNY Choice has opened a Utica–area

office at 2 Ellinwood Drive in New Hartford and hired three employees to start building relationships with senior centers, nursing organizations, and hospitals that could be-come part of its network. Palmieri expects to hire more employees in Central New York and the Mohawk Valley in the future, although exact timelines and staffing levels are not set.

“It is safe to say that we’ll have a major

presence in Oneida County, Herkimer County, and Onondaga County, and we’ll look at whether we need an office in Madison County,” he says. “A lot of our work force is field based.”

VNSNY Choice has hired its own nurse care managers in New York City. It could follow that model in upstate New York, or it could turn to subcontractors if they seem like a good fit, Palmieri says.

“Those care managers have a direct relationship with the patients today,” he says. “When there aren’t those opportuni-ties, we’re happy to build the infrastructure ourselves.”

The Medicaid managed long-term care plan does not have any members in Central New York or the Mohawk Valley at the mo-ment. It could sign up interested members today but will likely make a push at the end of 2012 or beginning of 2013, according to Palmieri.

VNSNY Choice doesn’t know how many members it will sign up, and it’s not clear how many competitors it will face in the up-state market. It has nearly 14,000 managed long-term care beneficiaries in New York City, Palmieri says.

Rough estimates show the plan will re-ceive about $18,500 per member per year in Medicaid revenue. Those payments will vary by hundreds of dollars in different state rating regions, however.

“Around the first of the year is when we’ll have a formalized business plan based upon what we’ve projected and budgeted,” Palmieri says. “The challenge we have right now is, because there has not been a man-aged long-term care delivery system for this type of long-term care in the past, it’s going to be tricky to get the rates right.”

VNSNY Choice has 1,470 total employ-ees. It offers Medicare Advantage plans, Medicaid long-term care plans, and a health plan for individuals with HIV/AIDS and their children. It forecasts premium revenue of about $1 billion in 2012 — about $550 million of which will come from man-aged long-term care plans. Palmieri didn’t

have estimates of premium revenue for 2013, but says top-line revenue is estimated to be about $1.8 billion in 2013.

The managed long-term care plan has existing operations in New York City’s five boroughs and previously received state approval to grow into Nassau, Suffolk, and Westchester counties.

More recent state decisions have given it approval to expand into Herkimer, Madison, Oneida, and Onondaga counties, as well as other counties. They include Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Sullivan, Ulster, Albany, Columbia, Delaware, Fulton, Greene, Montgomery, Otsego, Rensselaer, Schenectady, Saratoga, Schoharie, Warren, Washington, and Monroe counties.

VNSNY Choice has hired seven people in Fishkill in Dutchess County to spearhead its efforts in the Hudson Valley counties. It leased a 3,000-square-foot office there.

Palmieri is no stranger to the Mohawk Valley. He’s a Utica–area native who helped build Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare’s Senior Network Health managed long-term health-care plan in the late 1990s, he says. q

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State certifies Good Shepherd Fairview Home to provide en-hanced assisted-living services

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HealthCare Provider • Page 9June 13, 2014

bassett health care

After an extensive national search, the board of trustees of Bassett Medical Center has appointed Vance M. Brown, M.D. as president and CEO of the Bassett Healthcare Network and Bassett Medical Center, effective July 1. He succeeds Dr. William F. Streck, who is retiring after 30 years of leadership at Bassett. Brown comes to Bassett from MaineHealth in Portland, Maine, where he has been chief medical officer since 2008. As CMO at MaineHealth, he has been responsible for all medical issues at the corporate health system level. Brown was also senior medical officer for MMC Physician Hospital Organization with 1,100 physicians. Prior to returning to his native state of Maine, he served as the chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. Brown received his un-dergraduate degree in biological sciences from Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. and then obtained his medical degree from Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn. He completed his postgraduate residency training in fam-ily medicine at the University of North Carolina Hospitals where he was appointed chief resident his final year. Brown also completed a residency in internal medicine at Yale-New Haven Medical Center in New Haven, Conn. and did additional residency training in emergency medicine at UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. He is board-certified in both family medicine and internal medicine.

crouse hospital

Betty O’Connor has been named vice president for nursing operations at Crouse Hospital. With Crouse since 1979, she is a grad-uate of Crouse Irving Memorial Hospital School of Nursing and received her bachelor’s degree in nursing from SUNY Utica-Rome. She recently complet-ed work to receive the Healthcare Leadership Certificate from the Madden School of Business at Le Moyne College, where she is also pursuing her master’s degree in nursing.

danlee medical products

Danlee Medical Products, Inc. announced that John DeSantis has joined the firm as the e-commerce marketing assistant. He brings more than five years experience in the nonprofit sector, having worked in public relations and in social-media man-agement. DeSantis is founder of Believe in Syracuse, a civic organization that pro-

motes the positive features of the Greater Syracuse area, largely though Internet marketing and communications. He holds a bachelor’s degree in computer engineer-ing from Syracuse University.

faxton st. luke’s healthcare

Shannon Pelletier has joined the Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare’s (FSLH) Adirondack Community Physicians (ACP) at the Barneveld medical office as a fam-ily nurse practitioner. Her previous position with FSLH was as a family nurse practitio-ner in the emergency department and in the ACP Waterville medical office. Prior to joining ACP, Pelletier held positions as a registered nurse in various depart-ments of local hospitals and at the Child Advocacy Center in Utica. She earned her associate degree in nursing, her bach-elor’s degree in nursing, and her fam-ily nurse practitioner master’s degree at SUNYIT Utica/Rome in Marcy. Pelletier also completed five clinical residencies with area physicians.

Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare’s Adirondack Community Physicians has added Kevin J. Gehr to the orthopedic group as a physician as-sistant. He completed the nuclear medicine technology certificate program at Lancaster General College of Nursing and Health Sciences in Lancaster, Pa. and earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees of physician-assistant studies from Le Moyne College.

Rebecca A. Deeley, M.D., has joined the Level II Special Care Nursery in The Birthplace at Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare (FSLH). The Special Care Nursery is the only Level II in the Mohawk Valley. Prior to joining FSLH, she worked as a neonatologist at Moses Taylor Hospital in Scranton, Pa. and Community Medical Center in Missoula, Mont. Deeley also worked as a pediatric hospitalist at Children’s Specialty Group – Division of Neonatology in Norfolk, Va. She received her bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Delaware in Newark and her M.D. from UMDNJ – Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in Piscataway, N.J. She completed an internship and resi-dency in Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk and a fellowship in neonatology at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem,

N.C. Deeley is board-certified in neonatol-ogy and general pediatrics.

kph healthcare services, inc.

(formerly Kinney Drugs, Inc.)

Bridget-ann Hart has been promoted to president and CEO of KPH Healthcare Services, Inc. (formerly Kinney Drugs, Inc.). Hart will be responsible for oversee-ing the daily operations of KPH Healthcare Services, Inc. Craig Painter, former CEO and chairman of the board, assumed the po-sition of executive chairman of the board. Painter will remain actively engaged as chairman and will continue to be involved in the development of new business model strategies. Hart, who most recently served as president of Kinney health-care ser-vices, has been with the company for her entire career. She has held various senior leadership positions within the company in pharmacy and professional services, store operations, human resources, corporate development, and president & COO of Kinney Drugs stores.

mohawk valley health system

The Mohawk Valley Health System an-nounced that Deacon Paul H. Lehmann has been named di-rector of Mission for St. Elizabeth Medical Center, where he man-ages and coordinates the mission activities of the Mohawk Valley Health System (MVHS). He previously served as hospital chaplain for Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare. Lehmann has also held the positions of director of student activi-ties at the Strebel Student Center for Utica College, and director of Campus Life for SUNY Morrisville. He received his bach-elor’s degree in psychology from SUNY Fredonia and was ordained as permanent deacon through the Diocese of Syracuse.

Patricia Roach has been named se-nior vice president/chief nursing officer for MVHS. She will oversee nursing ser-vices for MVHS which includes Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare and St. Elizabeth Medical Center (SEMC). She will also oversee the St. Elizabeth College of Nursing and the Performance Excellence and Education Departments. Roach re-ceived her associate degree in nursing from Mohawk Valley Community College and her bachelor’s degree in nursing and master’s degree in nursing administration from SUNYIT Utica/Rome in Marcy. She completed the Management Fellowship for Nurse Executives at the University

of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and completed her post-master’s advanced certificate for fam-ily psychiatric-mental health nurse practitio-ner at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse. Varinya Sheppard has been named presi-dent of the St. Elizabeth College of Nursing. She is a graduate of the St. Elizabeth School of Nursing in Utica and received her bache-lor’s degree in nursing and master’s degree in nursing administration from SUNYIT Utica/Rome. Kathy Ward has been appointed director of nursing operations for MVHS. She received her associate degree in nurs-ing from St. Elizabeth College of Nursing, her bachelor’s degree in education from SUNY Cortland, and a master’s degree in health care administration from Canyon College in Carmichael, Calif. Ward also received a bachelor’s degree in nursing and a master’s degree in nursing administration from SUNYIT Utica/Rome. Nancy Traxel has been named nursing education depart-ment manager for MVHS. She will oversee clinical education at SEMC. Traxel received her diploma from St. Elizabeth School of Nursing and her bachelor’s degree in nursing from SUNYIT Utica/Rome. Colette Wilk has been named director of clinical edu-cation for MVHS. She will oversee the Keith A. Fenstemacher Center for Continuous Learning at Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare. Wilk received her as-sociate degree in accounting from MVCC, her associate degree in nursing from St. Elizabeth College of Nursing, her bache-lor’s degree in nursing from SUNYIT Utica/Rome, and her master’s degree in nursing education from Canyon College. Angela Belmont has been appointed assistant vice president of nursing for MVHS. Belmont will oversee EMS, emergency, trauma, and psychiatric services for the system as well as the stroke program. She received her as-sociate degree in nursing from MVCC and a bachelor’s degree in nursing and a mas-ter’s degree in nursing administration from SUNYIT Utica/Rome. Belmont also com-pleted the American College of Healthcare Executives Program. Rita Popeo has been named assistant vice president of nurs-ing for MVHS. She will oversee medical-surgical, pediatrics, and bariatric services for the system as well as the inpatient re-habilitation unit. Popeo received her bach-elor’s degree in nursing from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and her

HealtH-Care PeoPle-on-tHe-Move

NEWS

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master’s degree in nursing administration from Syracuse University. She also complet-ed the University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School, Financial Management Program for Nurses and Directors in Philadelphia. Lissette Grimaldi has been named as-sistant vice president of nursing for MVHS. She will oversee cardiac and critical care services for the system. She received her as-sociate degree in nursing from St. Elizabeth College of Nursing and her bachelor’s de-gree in nursing from Bellevue University in Bellevue, Neb. Grimaldi is currently work-ing toward her master’s degree in health care administration at Bellevue University. Heidi Coluzza has been appointed director of nursing for MVHS. She will oversee ma-ternity and diabetes services for the system as well as wound care and the vascular ac-cess team. Coluzza received her associate degree in nursing from St. Elizabeth College of Nursing and her bachelor’s degree in nursing and master’s degree in nursing administration from SUNYIT Utica/Rome. She has been board certified in medical-surgical nursing since 2004. Tom Norton has been named director of the Mohawk Valley Heart Institute and of cardiology services for MVHS. He received his bach-elor’s degree in communication from the University of Pittsburgh and his master’s de-gree in management with a concentration in health care administration from Wilmington University in New Castle, Del. Barbara Kantor has been named director of nursing for MVHS. She will oversee perioperative services for the system. Kantor received her associate degree in nursing from St. Elizabeth College of Nursing and her bache-lor’s degree in nursing from SUNYIT Utica/Rome. She is currently working toward her master’s degree in health-care administra-tion at Utica College. Charles Williams has been named director of perioperative operations for MVHS. He received his associate degree in health care administra-tion and his bachelor’s degree in health ad-ministration from the University of Phoenix in Arizona. Williams is currently working toward his master’s degree in health admin-istration through the University of Phoenix.

PRESBYTERIAN HOME

Christopher Durr has joined Presbyterian Home for Central New York as its new admin-istrator. He is a licensed nursing home adminis-trator with more than 15 years experience in long-term care. Durr holds a bachelor’s de-gree in sociology from St. Bonaventure University, and a master’s

degree in health-service management from the New School for Social Research.

PRESBYTERIAN RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY

Nicole Smith, RN has been hired as the new director of patient ser-vices at Presbyterian Residential Community. She previously worked at Presbyterian Homes & Services from 1995-2001 as a certified nursing assistant, and was most recently an infection preventionist at Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare. Smith graduated from St. Elizabeth School of Nursing with an associ-ate degree in nursing.

SLOCUMDICKSON MEDICAL GROUP

Jay M. Daly, M.D. has joined Slocum-Dickson Medical Group PLLC in the specialty of radi-ology. He is board-cer-tified in radiology and internal medicine. Daly completed his fellow-ship in abdominal imag-ing at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center in Worcester, Mass. He completed his residency in diagnostic radiology at the University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington, Conn. and an internal medi-cine internship at St. Vincent Hospital in Worcester, Mass. Daly received his medical degree from the University of Massachusetts in Worcester. He joins the Group with more than 20 years experience as a radiologist. Daly’s past responsibilities have included; president of the medical staff and chief of radiology at Bridgton Hospital in Maine. He also served as an instructor of diagnostic radiology at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. q

HEALTH-CARE PEOPLE-ON-THE-MOVE

NEWS (continued from p. 9)

Williams

Durr

Smith

Daly

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