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Alachua County Energy Conservation Strategies Commission

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Alachua County Energy Conservation Strategies Commission AARP presentation 02.04.2008
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  • Alachua County Energy Conservation Strategies Commission AARP presentation 02.04.2008

  • Alachua County CommissionBoard of County Commissioners of Alachua County wishes to do its part to reduce or mitigate the effects of Global Climate Change and promote the long-term economic security of its citizens through the implementation of policies that enhance energy efficiency

    Adopted Resolution 07-18 (March 27, 2007) & created Energy Conservation Strategies Commission (ECSC)

    Appointed ECSC members (May 22, 2007)

    ECSC final report due August, 2008

  • ECSC Mission

    To draft a comprehensive report on energy use, its relationship to climate change and local socio-economic impacts, including actions that can be implemented by the Board of County Commissioners and the community at large.

  • ECSC MembershipTwelve energy conservation experts Possess demonstrated expertise and/or advanced training in the areas of energy demand side management, LEED or Green Building Code standards, renewable energy technologies, or a related field.One representative of the University of FloridaOne former elected City of Gainesville CommissionerOne former elected Alachua County CommissionerOne alternate position

  • ECSC MembershipEnergy Conservation expertsDwight Adams Ed Brown Fred Depenbrock Christopher Fillie Ken FonorowPattie Glenn

    Harry KegelmannTom LaneMark SpillerRuth SteinerEduardo VargasOne Vacancy

  • ECSC MembershipUniversity of Florida RepresentativeStephen MulkeyFormer elected City of Gainesville Commissioner Warren NielsenFormer elected Alachua County Commissioner Penny WheatAlternate MemberBill Shepherd

  • ECSC ExpertiseOver 200 years of collective experienceGreen Building and Energy EfficiencyClimate Change, Adaptation and MitigationTransportationCommunity Design and PlanningAlternative EnergyPolicy Development and ImplementationDesign and EngineeringEnergy UtilityLocal Entrepreneurs

  • Community ChallengesEscalating energy costsClimate change: global and localClimate change refers to the variation in the Earth's global climate or in regional climates over time. It describes changes in the variability or average state of the atmosphere over time scales ranging from decades to millions of years. These changes can be caused by processes internal to the Earth, external forces (e.g. variations in sunlight intensity) and, more recently, human activities.Peak oil productionPeak Oil means not 'running out of oil', but 'running out of cheap oil'. For societies leveraged on ever increasing amounts of cheap oil, the consequences may be dire.Energy Bulletin: http://www.energybulletin.net/primer.php

  • Escalating energy costsCost of oil and gasolineOct 2001: $19.13/barrel $1.44/gallon gasOct 2007: $73.65/barrel $2.84/gallon gasMonthly Cost of Food for a Family of 4Oct 2001: $612Oct 2007: $750Average residential retail price of electricity2001: 8.63 cents/kWh2007: 10.61 cents/kWh97%23%23%

  • Climate changes

  • Peak & Decline - Oil ProductionPeak Oil doesnt mean 'running out of oil', but running out of cheap oil'.

    Increased cost to extract and refine remaining petroleum reserves.

    US GAO report (2007): While the consequences of a peak would be felt globally, the United States, as the largest consumer of oil and one of the nations most heavily dependent on oil for transportation, may be particularly vulnerable.Therefore, to better prepare the United States for a peak and decline in oil production, we are recommending that the Secretary of Energy take the lead, in coordination with other relevant federal agencies, to establish a peak oil strategy.

  • Peak Oil Time FrameOpinions differ: some think a peak has already happened or will occur soon.

    Some believe the peak will occur in the next 10 to 15 years.

    Optimistic opinions place the peak around 2030 to 2040.Lower estimates tend to come from petroleum geologists and physicists, the higher estimates from economists.

    Descending the Oil Peak: Navigating the Transition from Oil and Natural Gas pg 51 http ://www.portlandonline.com/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=145732

  • United States Oil ImportsThis chart depicts the sources of American oil imports. While the United States gets about 45% of its oil from the Middle East and North Africa, these regions hold over two thirds of the oil reserves worldwide.

    Driving the Future of Energy Security http://lugar.senate.gov/energy/graphs/oilimport.html

  • Peak Oil Production & DeclineImplicationsHeating & Cooling Costs The economic squeeze.Transportation within our community?Fertilizer & Food- Production declines, higher pricesTrucking Ripple effect throughout local economyIndividual Travel Reduced discretionary travel, including air travel and tourism

    Descending the Oil Peak: Navigating the Transition from Oil and Natural Gas pgs 55-56http://www.portlandonline.com/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=145732

  • Community OpportunitiesSome ECSC initial themes:Create an energy self-sufficient and resilient community.

    Develop local economy based on low-energy consumption.

    Develop multi-mode sustainable mobility infra-structure, with focus on public transportation.

    Maximize local food production.

    Maximize local, non-fossil fuel based energy production; create community employment opportunities.

  • ECSC Subcommittees Commercial, Governmental, Industrial & Institutional Buildings

    Land Use & Transportation

    Locally-applicable Alternative Energy Options

    Residential Buildings (inc. Low-Income Housing & Rental Properties)

    Waste & Energy Implications

  • ECSC SubcommitteeCommercial, Governmental, Industrial & Institutional Buildings

    Goal: Reduce energy consumption and maximize efficiencies in existing buildings. Develop best practices for new County buildings and leased Alachua County facilities. Focus on the jail, which is 50% of Alachua Countys total energy consumption.

  • ECSC Subcommittee Residential Buildings (inc. Low-Income Housing & Rental Properties)

    Goal: Reduce high utility bills and consumption of energy wasted by inefficiencies. Solutions will be quantifiable, based on current building science, and implementable. Work with community partners to leverage existing capital and volunteer expertise.

  • Energy Issues: BuildingsData from the US Energy Information Administration illustrates that buildings are responsible for almost half (48%) of all energy consumption and GHG emissions annually; globally the percentage is even greater. http://www.architecture2030.org/current_situation/building_sector.html

  • Energy Issues: BuildingsSeventy-six percent (76%) of all power plant-generated electricity is used just to operate buildings. Clearly, immediate action in the Building Sector is essential if we are to avoid hazardous climate change. http://www.architecture2030.org/current_situation/building_sector.html

  • Energy Issues: County BuildingsBuildings in Alachua County Government48 Alachua County Facilities (not counting leased space) totaling approximately 980,000 sqft19,257,309 kWh Total Electric Consumption (2005) up 2.9% from 2004.$1,458,796.54 Total Electric Cost (2005)

    Bringing the Global Perspective Home: Creating a case for high performance green buildings in Alachua County government.http://www.alachuacounty.us/assets/uploads/images/epd/documents/ECSC/GreenBldg_12-08-06.pdf

  • ECSC SubcommitteeLand Use & TransportationGoal: To plan and adapt to community threats and opportunities, and recommend policies and strategies designed to create integrated, sustainable best practices.

  • Energy Issues: TransportationAlachua County Government 437 total vehicles (FY 2005-2006)includes cars & hybrids, utility vehicles, light & electric pickup trucks, vans, medium and heavy trucks, heavy equipment and trailers. 482,812 total gallons of fuel used (FY 2005-2006) for this fleet. (Diesel= 344,943 gallons; Gasoline=137,869 gallons.)

    Review of Alachua County Fleet Management; Looking at number type and fuel consumption of vehicles. http://www.alachuacounty.us/assets/uploads/images/epd/documents/ECSC/Fleet_08-10-07.pdf

  • Energy Issues: Transportation2007 Alachua County193,588 vehicles2005 Florida 15.6 million vehicles 10,418,160 (Thousands of gallons)1998 Alachua County Consumed 88.1 million gallons of gasoline Consumed 6.5 million gallons of diesel

  • ECSC Subcommittee Locally-applicable Alternative Energy OptionsGoal: Increase use of renewable energy sources applicable within Alachua County.

  • ECSC SubcommitteeWaste & Energy ImplicationsGoal: Use waste materials for creation of locally-needed products; and/or power production. Consider examples of other communities (i.e., the City of Bern, Switzerland uses methane extracted from municipal sewage sludge to power city buses.)

  • Waste & Energy Implications

  • Contact the ECSC

    ECSC meetings: 1st and 3rd Mondays of the month at 5:30 PM in the County Administration Building, Second Floor, Grace Knight Conference Room.ECSC subcommittee meetings: Weekly on Tuesday & Wednesday. (call for details)Phone: 352-264-6800 Address: ECSC, 201 SE 2nd St., Suite 201, Gainesville, FL 32601Email: [email protected]

  • Energy Conservation ResourcesEnergy Bulletinhttp://www.energybulletin.net Energy Information Administration; Official Energy Statistics from the US Governmenthttp://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/aer/petro.htmlCRUDE OIL: Uncertainty about Future Oil Supply Makes It Important to Develop a Strategy for Addressing a Peak and Decline in Oil Production. United States Government Accountability Office, February 2007http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d07283.pdf

  • Energy Conservation Resources

    The New York Times Magazine August 21,2005 The Breaking Point, by Peter Maasshttp://www.petermaass.com/core.cfm?p=1&mag=124&magtype=1National Geographic, The End of Cheap Oil by Tim Appenzeller http://magma.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0406/feature5/fulltext.html

    Figure % increase of all commodities over the six year time period.

    Oct 5, 2001 United States $/barrel of oil http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/dnav/pet/hist/wtotusaw.htmOct 5, 2007 United States $/barrel of oil http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/dnav/pet/hist/wtotusaw.htm A barrel of oil has seen a 285% increase in cost since 2001.

    Oct 2001 US City average for retail gasoline all types of gasincludes taxescost per gallon from EAI: http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/merquery/mer_data.asp?table=T09.04Oct 2007 US City average for retail gasoline all types of gasincludes taxescost per gallon from EAI: http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/merquery/mer_data.asp?table=T09.04

    Monthly Food Cost for a Family of 4***US Oil Imports Canada is currently the largest provider of crude oil to the United States. January 2007: The United States produced 5,196 thousand barrels per day (34 %) and imported 10,192 barrels per day (66 %) of crude oil. The U.S. currently gets a total of about 55% of its crude oil from North America (U.S., Canada and Mexico combined).The top five exporting countries to the U.S. accounted for 68 % of United States crude oil imports in January while the top ten sources accounted for approximately 88 % of all U.S. crude oil imports. Middle East countries (Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Kuwait) accounted for a total of 22 % of all U.S. crude oil imports. http://www.appinsys.com/oil/* Air travel, which is very energy intensive and sensitive to fuel prices, will be one of thefirst industries to be affected. Fertilizer is made from natural gas, pesticides are made from oil. As oil and natural gasbecome scarcer and prices rise, agricultural production may decline. Food will becomemore expensive, and there may be an increase in hunger. Trucking will be one of the first industries to feel the pinch. However, this could have aripple effect throughout the economy. Prices of all goods may rise, and some goods mayremain undelivered. Some industries are critical and will survive the squeeze, others maynot. This will have ripple effects on employment, which could affect homelessness. Individual travel will be affected. Long vacations and other recreational or discretionarytrips likely will decline, with economic impacts on those businesses which depend on it. Heating costs will increase. Combined with employment impacts, many people will besqueezed economically. This could affect some peoples ability to maintain or own ahome, and put strain on individuals, families, and communities requiring additionalservices.100-year planning timeframe for ECSC report.**THE BUILDING SECTOR: A Hidden Culprit With so much attention given to transportation emissions, many people are surprised to learn that buildings are the single largest contributor to global warming. In order to clarify this misconception, Architecture 2030 has reshaped the debate surrounding climage change and GHG emissions to define and include a Building Sector. Previous pie charts distributed the various elements of the Building Sector into several sectors, i.e. industry, commercial, residential, transportation and so on. To determine the real energy impact of buildings, Architecture 2030 combined these various elements into a single sector called Buildings.* Data from the US Energy Information Administration illustrates that buildings are responsible for almost half (48%) of all energy consumption and GHG emissions annually; globally the percentage is even greater. Seventy-six percent (76%) of all power plant-generated electricity is used just to operate buildings. Clearly, immediate action in the Building Sector is essential if we are to avoid hazardous climate change. *To create a US Building Sector percentage for the year 2000, the Residential buildings (operations) sector (20.4 QBtu), Commercial buildings (operations) sector (17.2 QBtu), Industrial sector - buildings operations (2.0 QBtu) and the Industrial sector - annual building construction and materials embodied energy estimate (8.57 QBtu) were combined. Total annual 2000 Building Sector consumption was 48.17 QBtu and the total annual 2000 US Energy consumption was 99.38 QBtu. Source: US Energy Information Administration (consumption numbers vary slightly depending on the EIA table used. To be conservative, Architecture 2030 rounded down). The annual embodied energy of building materials and the energy used to construct buildings is estimated at 1.146 MBtu/sf of building for new construction and half of this for renovation. Source: US Energy Research and Development Administration. At the current rate of construction in the US of approx. 5 Bsf of new building and 5 Bsf of renovation (EIA and Dodge), the total annual energy consumed is approx. 8.6 QBtu, or 8.6% of total US annual energy consumption. http://www.architecture2030.org/current_situation/building_sector.html*THE BUILDING SECTOR: A Hidden Culprit With so much attention given to transportation emissions, many people are surprised to learn that buildings are the single largest contributor to global warming. In order to clarify this misconception, Architecture 2030 has reshaped the debate surrounding climage change and GHG emissions to define and include a Building Sector. Previous pie charts distributed the various elements of the Building Sector into several sectors, i.e. industry, commercial, residential, transportation and so on. To determine the real energy impact of buildings, Architecture 2030 combined these various elements into a single sector called Buildings.* Data from the US Energy Information Administration illustrates that buildings are responsible for almost half (48%) of all energy consumption and GHG emissions annually; globally the percentage is even greater. Seventy-six percent (76%) of all power plant-generated electricity is used just to operate buildings. Clearly, immediate action in the Building Sector is essential if we are to avoid hazardous climate change. *To create a US Building Sector percentage for the year 2000, the Residential buildings (operations) sector (20.4 QBtu), Commercial buildings (operations) sector (17.2 QBtu), Industrial sector - buildings operations (2.0 QBtu) and the Industrial sector - annual building construction and materials embodied energy estimate (8.57 QBtu) were combined. Total annual 2000 Building Sector consumption was 48.17 QBtu and the total annual 2000 US Energy consumption was 99.38 QBtu. Source: US Energy Information Administration (consumption numbers vary slightly depending on the EIA table used. To be conservative, Architecture 2030 rounded down). The annual embodied energy of building materials and the energy used to construct buildings is estimated at 1.146 MBtu/sf of building for new construction and half of this for renovation. Source: US Energy Research and Development Administration. At the current rate of construction in the US of approx. 5 Bsf of new building and 5 Bsf of renovation (EIA and Dodge), the total annual energy consumed is approx. 8.6 QBtu, or 8.6% of total US annual energy consumption. http://www.architecture2030.org/current_situation/building_sector.html*US Dept of Transportation Fed Highway Admin: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policy/ohim/hs05/motor_vehicles.htm STATE MOTOR-VEHICLE REGISTRATIONS - 2005 http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policy/ohim/hs05/htm/mv1.htm All motor vehicles 2005: 15,691,438 private commercial and publicly owned.

    US Dept of Transportation Fed Highway Admin: MOTOR-FUEL USE - 2005 http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policy/ohim/hs05/htm/mf21.htm Summary of total use: 10,418,160,000

    Also see: Vehicles in Florida US Census statistical abstract 2007: http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/transportation/ 1074 - State Motor Vehicle Registrations: 1980 to 2004 http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/tables/07s1074.xls

    From FL Dept of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles Revenue Report Jul 06-Jun07http://www.hsmv.state.fl.us/html/revpub/revpub_july06_june07.pdfAs of June 2007: 140288 Passenger Cars; 3572 Lease Vehicles; 120 Buses, Ambulances, Hearses; 30027 Trucks; 9136 Motorcycles and Mopeds; 9016 Truck Tractors; 1429 Recreational RV; Total Vehicles in Alachua County =193,588 *


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