Home >Documents >D4.3 analysis approach water reuse schemes -...

D4.3 analysis approach water reuse schemes -...

Date post:08-Jun-2020
Category:
View:3 times
Download:0 times
Share this document with a friend
Transcript:
  • The project “Innovation Demonstration for a Competitive and Innovative European Water Reuse Sector” (DEMOWARE) has received funding from the European Union’s 7th Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration, theme ENV.2013.WATER INNO&DEMO-1 (Water innova-tion demonstration projects) under grant agreement no 619040

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    DeliverableD4.3Cost‐benefitanalysisapproachsuitedforwaterreuseschemes

     

  • Deliverable Title  D4.3 CBA approach suited for water reuse schemes The original title was "Report on choice‐ experiment study of CBA and adaptation of the watereuse toolkit on water reclamation systems".  The report at hand specifies the tool for the cost‐benefit analysis of wa‐ter reuse schemes. Results of its application are presented in D4.4. 

    Related Work Package:  WP4: Business models and pricing strategies 

    Deliverable lead:  ACTEON 

    Author(s):  Ivan Zayas, Gloria De Paoli, Florimond Brun, Verena Mattheiß 

    Contact for queries  [email protected]‐environment.eu  

    Dissemination level:  Public 

    Due submission date:  30/04/2016 

    Actual submission:  10/07/2016 

    Grant Agreement Number:  619040 

    Instrument:  FP7‐ENV‐2013‐WATER‐INNO‐DEMO 

    Start date of the project:  01.01.2014 

    Duration of the project:  36 months 

    Website:  www.demoware.eu  

    Abstract   

     

    VersioningandContributionHistory Version  Date  Modified by   Modification reason 

    1.0  20/04/2016     

    2.0  01/06/2016  Ivan Zayas, Gloria De Paoli  Internal comments were addressed 

    3.0  05/07/2016  Gloria De Paoli  Reviewer’s comments were addressed (comments by Jos Frijns) 

    final  06/07/2016  Rita Hochstrat  Final edits  

        

  • ii 

    TableofcontentsVersioning and Contribution History ................................................................................................................. i List of figures ................................................................................................................................................... iii List of tables ..................................................................................................................................................... iv Executive Summary .......................................................................................................................................... 5 1  Introduction .............................................................................................................................................. 9 

    1.1  Cost‐benefit analysis in the DEMOWARE project: overview of the task ......................................... 9 1.2  Structure and contents of this report ............................................................................................ 10 

    2  Applying CBA to water reuse projects: literature review ...................................................................... 11 2.1  Cost‐benefit analysis: some general concepts ............................................................................... 11 2.2  CBA for water reuse: review of international experience.............................................................. 12 2.3  Specificities and challenges of applying CBA to water reuse projects ........................................... 15 2.4  Existing CBA Tool: the Water Reuse Foundation Toolkit ............................................................... 17 

    3  Building the backbone of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool ............................................................................ 18 3.1  Water  reuse  cost‐benefits  framework:    setting  a  generic water  reuse  system  to  frame  the 

    analysis ............................................................................................................................................ 20 3.1.1  Setting boundaries of the system and describing flows and stakeholders .............................. 20 3.1.2  Payment flows ........................................................................................................................... 21 3.1.3  Supplier Cost mapping and water treatment ........................................................................... 22 

    3.2  Water reuse CBA framework .......................................................................................................... 24 3.2.1  Qualitative description of the actual system and the different options of the project ........... 25 3.2.2  Financial analysis ....................................................................................................................... 29 3.2.3  Economic analysis: from financial values to economic values ................................................. 31 

    4  Using  the DEMOWARE CBA Tool  to perform cost‐benefit  analysis of a water  reuse project:  the user interface ......................................................................................................................................... 35 

    4.1  The DEMOWARE CBA Tool: how does it work in practice? ........................................................... 35 4.2  The user interface: how does it look like? ...................................................................................... 36 

    4.2.1  Project identification, context information and definition of scenarios .................................. 36 4.2.2  Financial analysis ....................................................................................................................... 38 4.2.3  Economic analysis ...................................................................................................................... 41 4.2.4  Sensitivity analysis ..................................................................................................................... 43 

    4.3  Improvements and novelties provided by the DEMOWARE CBA Tool .......................................... 43 4.4  Limitations of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool ....................................................................................... 44 

    5  Valuing the environmental benefits of water reuse systems ................................................................ 46 5.1  Stated preference valuation surveys .............................................................................................. 46 

    5.1.1  Contingent Valuation ................................................................................................................. 47 5.1.2  Choice Experiment .................................................................................................................... 51 5.1.3  CE and CV: Which method to use? ........................................................................................... 52 

    5.2  Application of Stated Preferences valuation methods in the DEMOWARE project ...................... 53 5.2.1  Application of the CE method for the Sabadell Case Study: short insight ............................... 53 5.2.2  Application of the CV method for the Braunschweig Case Study: short insight ...................... 56 

    6  Discussion and conclusions .................................................................................................................... 59 

  • iii 

    7  References .............................................................................................................................................. 60 Annex I – Full list of input data and output indicators of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool ................................... 62 

    Context description ‐ Input data to be entered in the Tool ...................................................................... 62 Financial analysis ........................................................................................................................................ 63 

    Input data to be entered in the Tool: .................................................................................................... 63 Output indicators provided by the Tool: ............................................................................................... 64 

    Economic analysis ....................................................................................................................................... 65 Input data to be entered in the Tool: .................................................................................................... 65 Output indicators provided by the Tool: ............................................................................................... 67 

    Annex II‐ Sabadell Choice Experiment questionnaire .................................................................................... 68 Annex III‐Braunschweig Contingent Valuation questionnaire ....................................................................... 87  

    Listoffigures Figure 1  The three layers of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool ......................................................................... 19 Figure 2  Flows and stakeholder relation in water reuse systems ........................................................... 20 Figure 3  Payment flows in water reuse systems ..................................................................................... 21 Figure 4  Supplier cost mapping of a water reuse system ....................................................................... 22 Figure 5  Schematic representation of a baseline scenario depicting the different users and water 

    flows ........................................................................................................................................... 26 Figure 6  Schematic representation of one potential water reuse system (Option 1) ........................... 26 Figure 7  Schematic representation of a potential water reuse system (Option 2) ................................ 27 Figure 8  Schematic representation (sources, flows, users) of water supply system including 

    alternative supply options (Option 3) ....................................................................................... 28 Figure 9  Layout of alternative treatment and supply options for a water reuse system....................... 29 Figure 10  Mapping the costs of water reuse projects .............................................................................. 30 Figure 11  Identification of environmental impacts in the flow diagram for water reuse scheme 

    option 2 ...................................................................................................................................... 32 Figure 12  Basic logical path underlying the DEMOWARE CBA Tool ......................................................... 35 Figure 13  Logical framework of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool: data flows, processes and outputs ............ 36 Figure 14  The DEMOWARE CBA Tool – Illustrative summary graphs on the context oft he projected 

    water reuse project ................................................................................................................... 37 Figure 15  The DEMOWARE CBA Tool – Building a project scenario ......................................................... 38 Figure 16  Using the DEMOWARE CBA Tool – Entering data on financial costs of each treatment unit .. 39 Figure 17  Using the DEMOWARE CBA Tool – Entering and visualizing data on financial costs and 

    revenues .................................................................................................................................... 39 Figure 18  Using the DEMOWARE CBA Tool – Output of the financial analysis ........................................ 40 Figure 19  Using the DEMOWARE CBA Tool – Entering data on economic costs and benefits ................ 42 Figure 20  Using the DEMOWARE CBA Tool – Creation of new economic costs and benefits ................. 42 Figure 21  Using the DEMOWARE CBA Tool – Changing cost parameters to test their impact on the 

    financial feasibility of the project scenario ............................................................................... 43 Figure 22  Structure of a typical CV questionnaire .................................................................................... 47  

  • iv 

    Listoftables Table 1  Review of existing CBA applications and available CBA frameworks for water reuse 

    projects ...................................................................................................................................... 13 Table 2  Distribution of investment and O&M costs along the project life ........................................... 29 Table 3  Using the DEMOWARE CBA Tool – Data input to define the context of the projected water 

    reuse project .............................................................................................................................. 37 Table 4  Using the DEMOWARE CBA Tool – Data input to describe the different project scenarios 

    under evaluation ....................................................................................................................... 37 Table 5  Using the DEMOWARE CBA Tool – Data requirements for performing the financial 

    analysis ....................................................................................................................................... 38 Table 6  Using the DEMOWARE CBA Tool – Data requirements for performing the financial 

    analysis ....................................................................................................................................... 41 Table 7  Improvements and novelties provided by the DEMOWARE CBA Tool ..................................... 44 Table 8  Types of payment vehicle .......................................................................................................... 48 Table 9  Advantages and drawbacks of the most commonly used value elicitation formats for CVs ... 49 Table 10  Using WTP follow‐up questions to determine valid responses ................................................ 50 Table 11  Example of a choice set in a CE value elicitation question ....................................................... 51  

  •  Deliverable D4.3

    ExecutiveSummaryThe appraisal of investment decisions –thus including investments in water reuse systems‐ cannot over‐look  the economic aspects and,  in particular,  the evaluation of  the welfare changes attributable  to  the proposed project. The application of cost‐benefit analysis  (CBA) to appraisal allows for a more efficient allocation of financial resources, as well as for demonstrating the convenience for society of a particular intervention  against  the  possible  alternatives  (EC,  2014b).  CBA  identifies  and  compares  the  costs  and benefits brought by the proposed project,  including social and environmental costs and benefits, and it provides: (i) a decision rule: benefits should exceed costs; and (ii) a criterion for comparing and ranking project alternatives: the size of net benefits, known as Net Present Value (FAO, 2010). 

    In principle, CBA is meant to compare not only financial costs, but also external costs and benefits, thus including environmental and social costs, and it can thus be an appropriate tool to evaluate the trade‐offs and the economic feasibility of a project; it provides in fact a basis for rational thinking about losses and gains subject to decision. The assessment and valuation of external costs and benefits (mainly social and environmental  costs  and  benefits)  remains  one  of  the main  challenge  of  applying  CBA  to water  reuse projects, and few evaluation frameworks have been developed so far (Godfrey et al, 2009).  

    Task 4.2 of Work Package 4 of the DEMOWARE project had the following objectives: 

    Develop an on‐line, user‐friendly CBA Tool which can be used  in any water  reuse plant across Europe by filling in the necessary information (the DEMOWARE CBA Tool); 

    Assess and assign a monetary value to the social and environmental benefits of water reuse in two case studies in Europe; 

    Perform a CBA in the two case studies by using the DEMOWARE CBA Tool. This deliverable (D4.3) presents the theoretical and methodological aspects of:  (i)  the DEMOWARE CBA Tool; and (ii) the application of stated preference techniques to the evaluation of the economic benefits of water reuse systems in two pilot sites (Sabadell and Braunschweig). A second deliverable (D4.4), draft‐ed  in parallel,  illustrates the results of the evaluation of economic benefits  in the two pilot sites, and  it illustrated the preliminary application of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool to one of these sites.  

    The DEMOWARE CBA Tool took as a source of inspiration the Water Reuse Foundation Toolkit1, an eco‐nomic framework (based on excel spreadsheets) developed to support water managers in the identifica‐tion, estimation and communication of the costs and benefits of water reuse. 

    In addition, existing approaches to CBA for water reuse projects in Europe and elsewhere were reviewed. All proposed frameworks include some environmental benefits; however, the definition and the selection of benefits taken into account is not homogeneous across the different studies.  

    The review of existing experiences of applying CBA to water reuse projects highlighted two key challeng‐es, and in particular: 

    The  identification and valuation of external benefits  (positive externalities), which often do not have a market value. All proposed frameworks include some environmental benefits; but none of them is comprehensive and accurate (as also observed Kihila et al, 2014). The economic value of these projects is often underestimated due to the failure of properly accounting for and quantify‐ing  the many benefits of water  reuse  (e.g. watershed protection,  local economic development, improvement  of  public  health),  which  often  have  a  non‐monetary  nature  (e.g.  Godfrey  et  al, 2009); and 

     

    1 https://watereuse.org/watereuse‐research/03‐06‐an‐economic‐framework‐for‐evaluating‐benefits‐and‐costs‐of‐water‐reuse/  

  •  DEMOWARE GA No. 619040

    Benefits of water  reuse projects can be site specific, and so can be  the costs. Thus, every case study has to be analyzed from a demand‐driven perspective. In the literature, many case studies can be found, but no universal tool has been developed for the moment as CBA is site‐specific. 

    The DEMOWARE CBA Tool aims at addressing current challenges and shortcomings of the application of CBA to water reuse projects. In particular: 

    The Tool is specifically designed and customized for implementing CBA for water reuse projects, thus reflecting their characteristics and specificities; 

    As mentioned earlier, the application of CBA to water reuse project is very site and case specific. Thus a CBA tool must be flexible enough so that its application can be customized to the specific case under evaluation; 

    In addition,  the  tool must  facilitate  the evaluation of water  reuse projects by assisting decision makers  and/or  plant  managers  in  gathering  data  input,  calculating  indicators  and  providing graphic representations of results. 

    To achieve the first two objectives, the Tool must be built on an appropriate conceptual and methodolog‐ical framework. To achieve the third objective, the Tool must also support and guide decision makers in the evaluation of water reuse project. For these reasons, the DEMOWARE CBA Tool is built on three lay‐ers (as also shown in the figure below): 

    1. Generic water  reuse  system  framework:  this  layer  defines  and  designs  a  generic water  reuse system so that it can include different treatment processes, different water sources and different uses of treated wastewater. This system is as generic as possible so that it can be adapted to each specific site, and it constitutes the basic layer upon which the DEMOWARE CBA Tool is built; 

    2. Cost‐benefit analysis framework: the second layer of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool defines and de‐signs the different steps to be followed in CBA, and it allows for representing all flows occurring among stakeholders and physical components of the system (physical flows such as wastewater and treated water, financial flows, flows of non‐monetary costs and benefits); 

    3. A user‐friendly interface to support and guide decision makers in the evaluation of water reuse project. 

     The three layers are described in detail in this deliverable. The user interface, in particular, provides oper‐ational  information on how  to proceed when performing CBA with  the DEMOWARE CBA Tool,  such  as required input (by the user) and output provided by the Tool. The Tool operates on four steps: 

    1. Project identification, context information and definition of scenarios: information on the context (economic,  social  and  demographic  data,  information  on water  demand  and  supply  as well  as pricing strategies) and development of project scenarios to be evaluated; 

  •  Deliverable D4.3

    2. Financial analysis: evaluation of the financial feasibility/ sustainability of the different project sce‐narios, based on  financial  costs and benefits. Based on  this analysis,  the Tool provides  the Net Present  Value,  the  Internal  Rate  of  Return  and  the  Benefit‐Cost  Ratio  (based  only  on  financial costs and revenues). Graphs and excel tables to illustrate results are also created; 

    3. Economic  analysis:  evaluation of  the economic  sustainability  of  the different  project  scenarios, based on financial costs and benefits but also on economic costs and benefits (e.g. environmen‐tal, social, health, cultural costs and benefits). Based on this analysis, the Tool calculates the Net Present Value, the Economic Internal rate of Return and the Cost‐Benefit Ratio. Graphs and excel tables to illustrate results are also created; 

    4. Sensitivity analysis: this is a usual (and required) step of the CBA, and the Tool makes it extremely easy and handy to perform it. Sensitivity analysis assesses the sensitivity of results to changes in some parameters, e.g. the impact that a change in one or more parameters could have on the fi‐nancial and economic sustainability of the project –the Tool can in fact perform this analysis on both the financial and economic analysis. This analysis can be done, for example, on cost parame‐ters or on pricing strategies (i.e. assessing the impact of different pricing strategies on the finan‐cial and economic sustainability of project scenarios).  

    The novelties provided by the DEMOWARE CBA Tool can be summarized as follows: 

    The Tool links water supply and demand (both for conventional and reused water), taking into ac‐count the demand‐driven specificity; 

    The Tool assesses the impact of reused water consumption on freshwater consumption, as well as cross‐price elasticity of water demand; 

    The Tool is easily accessible for an effective use by plant managers and decision makers, as it is a web‐based application for which no specific software is needed. The Tool is also easy to maintain and update. 

    The current version of the Tool also has some shortcomings. The tool is particularly tailored to a situation where a new water reuse project is considered, which is driven by an existing (high) demand for water ‐ and where water treatment  is  linked to this reuse.  In this case  it  is particularly relevant: (i) to take  into account the different (alternative) water providers (including public water supply); and (ii) to consider all treatment costs in the framework of a cost‐benefit analysis.  However, these two basic functionalities of the tool are not of  interest  in a situation where wastewater treatment already exists or where the only alternative to wastewater reuse consists in private water abstraction. In addition, the tool is designed for carrying out ex‐ante CBA’s, whereas in the case of ex‐post CBA slightly different approaches need to be applied (see for example EC, 2014b; CSIL & DKM, 2012).  

    Nevertheless,  the  current  version of  the DEMOWARE CBA Tool  is  to be  considered as preliminary:  the Tool  is  in  fact being tested  in two case studies (Sabadell and Braunschweig), and further testing will be done before the end of the project. Based on the outcomes of the testing phase, shortcomings and limi‐tations of the Tool will be addressed whenever possible. The final version of the CBA Tool will be made available online before the end of the DEMOWARE project. 

    As previously mentioned, a comprehensive identification and valuation of economic, environmental and social benefits of water reuse projects is of paramount importance when conducting a CBA. In many cas‐es,  these benefits do not have a market value, but  they are  indeed valued by society  (e.g.  recreational services provided by a constructed wetland for water purification). Economic valuation thus refers to the assignment of money values to non‐marketed assets, goods and services, where the money values have a particular and precise meaning. Non‐marketed goods and services  refer  to  those which may not be di‐rectly bought and sold in a market place (Hanley and Barbier, 2009)  

  •  DEMOWARE GA No. 619040

    Several valuation techniques exist for the valuation of non‐market benefits.  In the DEMOWARE project, stated preference techniques were selected to evaluate the environmental benefits of water reuse in the demo sites of Sabadell and Braunschweig. Stated preference approaches on the other hand are based on constructed markets, i.e. they ask people what economic value they attach to those goods and services. In other words,  the economic  value  is  revealed  trough a hypothetical  or  constructed market based on questionnaires (Pearce et al. 2002).  In particular, two techniques were used: 

    Contingent Valuation (CV) methodology involves asking a random sample of respondents for their willingness  to pay  (WTP)  for  a  clearly defined good, or willingness  to accept  (WTA) a  loss.  This value are elicited by the means of questionnaires distributed to a sample of the relevant popula‐tion. This technique was used in the Braunschweig case study to assess the value of the preserva‐tion and recharge of local groundwater resources, and the protection of the water quality of the nearby river Oker; 

    Choice Experiment  (CE) methodology differs  from CBA only  in respect of  the valuation scenario component, and the way this is elicited in questionnaires. This technique was used in the Sabadell case study to assess the social value given to indirect benefits stemming from securing, with re‐used water, different urban water uses in the city even during drought restrictions. 

    In summary, this deliverable presents the conceptual and methodological framework developed and ap‐plied to CBA in the DEMOWARE project. Deliverable 4.4 goes hand in hand with the present deliverable, as it presents the results of the practical application of: (i) stated preference techniques for the evalua‐tion of economic benefits of water reuse; and (ii) the DEMOWARE CBA Tool. These two elements were applied in practice in the Sabadell and Braunschweig sites. 

  •  Deliverable D4.3

    1 Introduction

    1.1 Cost‐benefitanalysisintheDEMOWAREproject:overviewofthetaskThe appraisal of investment decisions –thus including investments in water reuse systems‐ cannot over‐look  the economic aspects and,  in particular,  the evaluation of  the welfare changes attributable  to  the proposed project. The application of cost‐benefit analysis  (CBA) to appraisal allows for a more efficient allocation of financial resources, as well as for demonstrating the convenience for society of a particular intervention  against  the  possible  alternatives  (EC,  2014b).  CBA  identifies  and  compares  the  costs  and benefits brought by the proposed project,  including social and environmental costs and benefits, and it provides: (i) a decision rule: benefits should exceed costs; and (ii) a criterion for comparing and ranking project alternatives: the size of net benefits, known as Net Present Value (FAO, 2010). 

    In principle, CBA is meant to compare not only financial costs, but also external costs and benefits, thus including environmental and social costs, and it can thus be an appropriate tool to evaluate the trade‐offs and the economic feasibility of a project; it provides in fact a basis for rational thinking about losses and gains subject to decision. The assessment and valuation of external costs and benefits (mainly social and environmental  costs  and  benefits)  remains  one  of  the main  challenge  of  applying  CBA  to water  reuse projects, and few evaluation frameworks have been developed so far (Godfrey et al, 2009).  

    Against this background, the objectives of WP4, Task 4.2 were the following: 

    Develop an on‐line, user‐friendly CBA Tool which can be used  in any water  reuse plant across Europe by filling in the necessary information (the DEMOWARE CBA Tool); 

    Assess and assign a monetary value to the social and environmental benefits of water reuse in two case studies in Europe; 

    Perform a CBA in the two case studies by using the DEMOWARE CBA Tool. 

     

    Task 4.2 involved the following steps: 

    Critical  literature review of existing CBA frameworks  for water reuse projects and their applica‐tion to case studies; 

    Development of the preliminary CBA tool, presented in this deliverable;  Assessment of the environmental benefits of water reuse in the two case study sites, by applying 

    the choice experiment method (in Sabadell – ES) and the contingent valuation method (in Braun‐schweig – DE), presented in this deliverable; 

    Testing the CBA tool for the case study sites (Sabadell – ES and Braunschweig – DE), building on the  information collected for each case study (in particular: “reference scenario” and “develop‐ment  scenario”,  financial  costs and  revenues under  these different  scenarios, etc.).  The  testing phase  aims  at  identifying  adaptations  that  are  required  for  accounting  for  the  entire  range  of costs and benefits to be considered. The testing phase is on‐going, and some preliminary consid‐erations on strengths and weaknesses of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool are included in this delivera‐ble; 

    Implementing proposed adaptations of the CBA tool following the testing. This will be done in the coming months, and before the end of the project; 

    Writing the tool’s “users' manual” which will be delivered in month 36 together with deliverable D4.7.  

     

  • 10 

     DEMOWARE GA No. 619040

    1.2 StructureandcontentsofthisreportBased on the outcomes of Task 4.2 of the DEMOWARE project two deliverables have been developed: 

    Deliverable D4.3: CBA approach suited for water reuse schemes (the present report) – this deliv‐erable presents the theoretical and methodological sides of Task 4.2 activities; and 

    Deliverable D4.4: Show cases demonstrating the relevance of the social and economic benefits of water  reuse schemes to the  local communities –  this deliverable  focuses on the results of Task 4.2, and  in particular  it presents  the  findings of  the  two case studies: Sabadell  (ES) and Braun‐schweig (DE). 

    The two reports have been drafted in parallel, as they are presenting two parts of the same task.  

    More in detail, the present deliverable includes: 

    Chapter 2 – Applying CBA to water reuse projects: literature review. This chapter includes: o Some general concepts on CBA; o A review of  international experience  in  the application of CBA to water  reuse projects; 

    and o An overview of the specificities and challenges of applying CBA to water reuse projects; 

    Chapter 3 – Building the backbone of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool. This chapter illustrates the con‐ceptual  and methodological  framework  based  on which  the  DEMOWARE  CBA  Tool was  devel‐oped. It includes:  

    o An  illustration  of  the  generic  system built  to  frame  the  analysis.  The CBA DEMOWARE Tool was developed based on this framework; and 

    o A step‐by‐step illustration of the CBA analysis;  Chapter 4 – Using  the DEMOWARE CBA Tool  to perform cost‐benefit analysis of a water  reuse 

    project. This chapter presents the Tool from the users’ perspective. In particular, it provides: o An overview of how the DEMOWARE CBA Tool works in practice; o A presentation of the user interface: what it looks like, the data to be entered, the output 

    provided by the Tool; o A highlight of the advantages of the Tool, as compared to other CBA frameworks for wa‐

    ter reuse projects; and o A discussion on the current limitations of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool. As the testing phase 

    is on‐going, this section only presents some preliminary considerations based on experi‐ences with testing so far.  

    Chapter 5 – Valuing the environmental benefits of water reuse systems: this chapter provides the theoretical basis of the stated preference valuation techniques applied in the two case studies, as well as a description of the methodology applied in the two sites (the results are presented in de‐liverable D4.4). The chapter presents and compares the two valuation techniques adopted in Task 4.2, and in particular: 

    o Contingent Valuation technique; o Choice experiment; o CV and CE: what method should be used?   

  • 11 

     Deliverable D4.3

    2 ApplyingCBAtowaterreuseprojects:literaturereview

    2.1 Cost‐benefitanalysis:somegeneralconceptsCost‐Benefit Analysis (CBA) is an analytical tool for evaluating the economic advantages or disadvantages of an investment decision, and it assesses the costs and benefits in order to assess the welfare changes attributable to it. In this analysis, cost and benefits must be all expressed in monetary terms, which allows for comparing cost and benefit items of different nature (e.g. market and non‐market benefits of a pro‐ject).  The  project  overall  performance  is  measured  by  indicators,  and  namely:  the  Net  Present  Value (NPV, the Internal Rate of Return (IRR) and the’ Cost‐Benefit Ratio (BCR); these indicators allow compara‐bility and ranking for project alternatives (EC, 2014b). The main strength of the CBA is thus to facilitate the comparison of seemingly different kinds of costs and benefits, providing evidence for decision makers to decide on the scheme of water reuse that is likely to deliver the highest net benefits. 

    Some basic concepts underlie CBA (FAO 2010): 

    There are always alternatives. When undertaking a CBA  for a specific project, other alternative solutions should also be assessed, so that the best available solution is selected. The best availa‐ble solution should be the most effective in reaching project objectives, as well as (or at least) the most feasible (e.g; practical, timely, acceptable); in addition, it should be the most cost‐effective option. CBA allows for analysing available options and rank  them based on their  respective net benefits; 

    The business‐as‐usual (BAU) option, also called the do‐nothing option or counterfactual scenario, must be considered, as the net costs and benefits of the different project options must be care‐fully weighed and compares against the present situation. In other words, the BAU options pro‐vides the benchmark against which the project is evaluated; 

    Resources used in the project options normally have alternative uses, and this implies an oppor‐tunity costs (their value to society in their best alternative use). These costs must be considered in CBA; 

    CBA is a quantitative decision tool, which means that costs and benefits should be quantified (as much as possible)  –otherwise  they  cannot be  taken  into  account  in  the  analysis.  In  case  some cost and benefit  items are not quantified  (e.g. environmental benefits and costs),  this must be clearly specified; 

    The time diming of costs and benefits –and, consequently, the choice of a correct time horizon‐ is a crucial aspect of CBA, as this analysis has a long term perspective –and it is generally applied to projects  whose  life  extends  well  into  the  future,  such  as  for  example  irrigation  system  and wastewater treatment/ reuse projects. The long life of the projects under evaluation requires the use of discounting, which reflects both society’s time preference and what the capital employed could earn in alternative uses. 

    CBA typically involves the following steps (CSIL & DKM, 2012; Garcia and Pargament, 2015): 

    1. Project identification, based on: (i) self‐sufficiency of the investments; and (ii) pertinence and tim‐ing of the investments; 

    2. Selection of the appropriate time horizon; 3. Definition of the counterfactual scenario (BAU); 4. Demand analysis: forecasting the future and testing the assumptions; 5. Selection of the appropriate discount rate; 

  • 12 

     DEMOWARE GA No. 619040

    6. Quantification of costs and benefits,  including: (i) financial costs and benefits (to be used in the financial analysis); (ii) direct effects; (iii) externalities and indirect impacts (both positive and neg‐ative); (iv) avoided costs; and (v) non‐quantifiable effects; 

    7. Determination of shadow prices; and 8. Calculation of CBA indicators (NPV, IRR, CBR); 9. Economic sensitivity analysis, to investigate the robustness and reliability of CBA results. 

    The choice of the discount rate is an important issue in CBA. People generally assign greater importance to  present  benefits  rather  than  future  benefits.  Comparison  of  costs  and  benefits with  different  time‐paths is facilitated by discounting them to their “present day” values using a discount rate, which is com‐parable to an interest rate. The further a cost or benefit  is placed in the future, the  lower its “present” value will be. 

    The choice of the appropriate time horizon is closely  linked with the concept of discounting. An  invest‐ment will have a certain lifespan, and in general this should determine the time‐frame used in the CBA, although in many cases a standard timeframe such as 30 years is used. Sometimes the lifespan will vary for different parts of the investment, e.g. a waste water treatment plant will have longer‐lived buildings and shorter‐lived pumps and electronic equipment. The choice of the timeframe will obviously have an impact  on  the  present  value  of  costs  and  benefits  which will  be  realized  in  the  future,  as well  as  the choice of the discount rate. For example, the rate traditionally used in Ireland for public projects, as rec‐ommended by the Department of Finance (1994), is 5% real (i.e. net of inflation). Controversy arises be‐cause many environmental benefits and costs accrue  long  into  the  future, and discounting means  that their present values can be negligible. 

    The following sections present existing applications of CBA to water reuse projects, as well as an overview of the main specificities and challenges of the application of CBA to water reuse projects. 

    2.2 CBAforwaterreuse:reviewofinternationalexperienceWater  reuse  closes  the  loop  between water  supply  and wastewater  disposal.  After  appropriate  treat‐ment, wastewater becomes again a resource which can be used for different purposes.  In particular  in‐creasing situations of water scarcity are putting water reuse more and more on the political agenda, as an alternative source of water supply. The significant potential for further development of water reuse pro‐jects in the EU has been widely recognized (EC, 2014a).  

    In  parallel,  cost  benefit  analysis  (CBA)  applied  to  the  reuse  of  treated wastewater  effluent  has  gained interest. Both scientists and water managers want to understand whether investing in water reuse can be viable or not by  looking not only at  technological and financial aspects, but also at environmental ones (Kihila et al, 2014).   

    Investment costs incurred in the construction of a wastewater treatment plant are generally the largest cost  component  of  water  reuse  projects  (Molinos‐Senante  et  al.,  2011).  The  minimization  of  costs  is therefore a major issue, next to environmental standards which have to be complied with (Hussain et al., 2002). Urkiaga et al. (2008) found that the cost‐effectiveness of water reuse projects is directly related to the  volume of wastewater used:  “the  larger  the quantity of water  treated and  reused,  the more  cost‐effective the project becomes” (Kihila et al., 2014). This applies also to water treatment in general: larger treatment plants are more cost‐effective than smaller ones (Hernández‐Sancho and Sala‐Garrido, 2009).  

    CBA tries to incorporate all social costs and benefits of an investment in monetary terms (whether they have a market price or not), and in doing so it determines whether benefits exceed costs. Where market prices are not available, some other means of deriving monetary values must be used. An important ad‐vantage of CBA  is  that by  reducing all  cost and benefit  components  (thus  including environmental and 

  • 13 

     Deliverable D4.3

    non‐environmental, private and social costs and benefits) to monetary terms and assessing them with a consistent methodology, policy makers and planners can effectively “compare apples and oranges”. That is, they can compare projects within and across different fields of public policy (e.g. roads, hospitals, wa‐ter treatment plants) and prioritize public investment policy according to which projects give the greatest return to society. 

    Existing “best practice” examples of project CBA for WWTPs do an excellent job in capturing beneficiaries’ willingness‐to‐pay  for  improved water  supply  and  sanitation  services.  In  some  cases,  external  environ‐mental impacts have also been taken into account in the CBA. The challenge is to correctly identify these external effects―both benefits and costs―and bring them into the analysis. Table 1 provides an overview of some of the existing applications of CBA to water reuse projects. 

    Table 1 Review of existing CBA applications and available CBA frameworks for water reuse projects

    Case study  Project description  CBA framework: description 

    Environmental bene‐fits considered 

    Results 

    Akrotiri aquifer (Birol et al, 2009) 

    Aquifer recharge with treated wastewater 

    Long‐run CBA with declining social discount rate over the selected time horizon, to better account for future benefits Benefits valuation: Choice experiment 

    Willingness to pay for quality and quantity improve‐ment by farmers and residents 

    NPV= 28.51 ÷ 71.1 million EUR 

    Greywater reuse in residential schools in Madhya Pradesh, India (Godfrey et al, 2009) 

    Greywater treat‐ment and reuse system in residential schools. Treated greywater is used for toilet flushing and irrigation of food crops. 

    Feasibility of grey‐water reuse is worked out by quan‐tifying benefits in monetary terms and comparing with cost of greywater reuse system. The system considers both in‐ternal and external benefits and costs. Total benefits in‐clude internal and external benefits minus opportunity costs. 

    Benefits considered in the CBA include: savings in tankered water, avoided in‐frastructure costs, avoided groundwa‐ter exploitation, avoided pollution, availability of vege‐tables, reuse of pollutants, water protection, health benefits. 

    Annualized invest‐ment and O&M costs: EUR 157/year Environmental ben‐efits: EUR 1 656/year Health benefits: EUR 10 596/year Benefits >> Costs The benefit to cost ratio is higher than those for water resource projects. 

    CBA of a decentral‐ized water system for wastewater reuse and environ‐mental protection (Chen and Wang, 2009) 

    The general model was applied to a decentralized reuse system in a newly developed residen‐tial area. Two differ‐ent scenarios were considered: (1) wa‐ter reuse for garden‐ing only; and (2) water reuse for gardening and re‐plenishment of an 

    Net benefit value (NBV) approach. Equations are pro‐vided for calculating each cost and bene‐fit category. 

    Benefits included in the model: water savings, labour sav‐ings, wastewater discharge, environ‐mental improve‐ment, health protec‐tion 

    Scenario 1 – NBV= 159 EUR Scenario 2 – NBV= 24966 EUR 

  • 14 

     DEMOWARE GA No. 619040

    Case study  Project description  CBA framework: description 

    Environmental bene‐fits considered 

    Results 

    artificial pond. 

    CBA of water reuse for environmental projects in Spain (Molino‐Senante et al, 2011) 

    The proposed ap‐proach is applied to 13 wastewater treatment plants in the Valencia region of Spain that reuse effluent for envi‐ronmental purposes. 

    The proposed ap‐proach considers the internal benefit, external benefit and opportunity cost. It provides the equa‐tions by which each of the parameters can be computed. 

    The approach pro‐vides the sum ot total internal and external benefits. Total internal bene‐fits: internal income (e.g. reuse of nutri‐ents in agriculture,  – internal costs Total external bene‐fits: external bene‐fits (estimated through shadow pricing) – external impacts 

    Average total bene‐fits over the 13 wastewater treat‐ment plants: 3.9 Million EUR/year 1220 EUR/m3 

    Reusing wastewater to cope with water scarcity in Israel (Garcia and Par‐gament, 2014) 

    Development of a CBA methodology for water reuse systems  Case study: water reuse replenishment of the Yarqon river, for environmental improvement and  for indirect reuse in irrigation. Three scenarios were in‐vestigated: pessimis‐tic, base‐case and optimistic. 

    Five‐step approach: Selection and evalu‐ation of the water reuse plan; Estimation of inter‐nal costs (invest‐ment and O&M costs); Estimation of exter‐nal trade‐offs (costs and benefits); Implementation of CBA; Sensitivity analysis. 

    External benefits: reliable water sup‐ply, fertilization, less restrictions on water use, consumer atti‐tudinal impact, re‐duced pollution, provision of ecosys‐tem services 

    Pessimistic scenario – NPV= ‐24 mio. EURBase‐case scenario: NPV= 4.3 mio. EUR Optimistic scenario: NPV= 35.6 mio. EUR As also confirmed by the sensitivity analy‐sis, relevant exter‐nalities might have a strong impact on the economic feasibility of the wastewater reuse projects 

    Water reuse in the Po valley: compari‐son of natural and conventional treatment for water reuse (Verlicchi et al, 2012) 

    Project to reuse part of the final effluent from the Ferrara wastewater treat‐ment plant for irri‐gation and to devel‐op the site for rec‐reational purposes. Treatment technol‐ogy: natural polish‐ing (e.g. artificial lagoons)  

    Traditional CBA methodology 

    Agricultural reuse of reclaimed wastewater (im‐proved water avail‐ability) Environmental ben‐efit for the quality of the Po di Volano canal Financial benefit (reduction in energy consumption) Recreational benefit for the users of the park (through con‐tingent valuation) 

    NPV= 40 000 EUR Benefit‐Cost ratio (BCR)= 1.007 Internal Rate of Return (IRR)= 5% (exactly equal to the applied discount rate) 

    Development of a CBA approach for water reuse in irri‐gation 

    A CBA method for water reuse in irriga‐tion was developed, based on existing 

    The net benefit value approach (Chen and Wang, 2009) was adapted and customized to 

    Additional water made available, with nutrients Improved crop pro‐

    The methodology developed in the paper is not applied to a specific case 

  • 15 

     Deliverable D4.3

    Case study  Project description  CBA framework: description 

    Environmental bene‐fits considered 

    Results 

    (Kihila et al, 2014)  approaches  water reuse in irriga‐tion, taking into consideration the benefits that can be realized when the reuse type is for agricultural produc‐tion. 

    ductionJob creation Environmental ben‐efits: reduced pollu‐tion and improved water quality, im‐proved public health, environmen‐tal protection and reduced impact on ecosystems 

    study 

    Overall, some messages can be drawn from the literature reviewed: 

    If environmental and social benefits are considered, total benefits of water reuse projects exceed costs; 

    All proposed frameworks include some environmental benefits; however, the definition and the selection of benefits taken into account is not homogeneous across the different studies. The se‐lection and quantification of external benefits can have a strong impact on the evaluation of the feasibility of a project (as revealed by CBA); 

    Total benefits and project’s NPV increase with rising ambition of the project: the more the final uses for reused water, the largest the benefits (e.g. the benefits of water reuse for gardening and environmental purposes are larger than the benefits provided by the same project if reused wa‐ter is only used for gardening). 

    2.3 SpecificitiesandchallengesofapplyingCBAtowaterreuseprojectsThe review of existing experiences of applying CBA to water reuse projects highlighted two key challeng‐es, and in particular: 

    The  identification and valuation of external benefits  (positive externalities), which often do not have a market value; and 

    Benefits of water reuse projects can be site specific, and so can be the costs. 

    These challenges are presented in more detail in the paragraphs below. 

     

    Valuation of non‐market costs and benefits 

    The valuation of benefits is thus a key point of CBA for water reuse projects. Although it is in theory pos‐sible to have monetary values for calculating impacts, water reuse projects create a series of externalities for  which  no  explicit  market  exists,  so  in  such  cases  the  valuation  must  use  hypothetical  scenarios (Hernández et al., 2006). Despite the availability of some attempts to do cost benefit analysis, none of the available approaches and case studies have been comprehensive and accurate (as also observed by Kihila et al., 2014;  see also Table 1).  This  is  in particular due  to  the  fact  that  regarding water  reuse projects, there is no universal way that can fit all cases due to differences in local circumstances (Chen and Wang, 2009).  

    When applying CBA to water reuse projects, it is often highlighted that the economic value of these pro‐jects is often underestimated due to the failure of properly accounting for and quantifying the many ben‐

  • 16 

     DEMOWARE GA No. 619040

    efits  of  water  reuse  (e.g.  watershed  protection,  local  economic  development,  improvement  of  public health), which often have a non‐monetary nature (e.g. Godfrey et al, 2009). 

    In general, this  is perhaps the most controversial aspect of CBA. Environmental goods and services that are not normally bought and sold in the marketplace cannot readily be valued. Growing recognition of the importance of these goods and services has been matched by increased attempts to develop monetary valuations techniques. And this  is particularly pertinent  in the economic evaluation of water supply and wastewater  treatment  projects.  A  variety  of  approaches  has  been  developed  to  value  environmental goods and services. Two broad categories are Stated Preference and Revealed Preference techniques.  

    In addition, the benefits of water reuse projects can often be distributed among different entities, entities which might  not  bear  the  costs  of  projects  (Garcia  and  Pargament,  2015).  Therefore  one  needs  to  be careful in defining the group of beneficiaries (or losers) from an environmental or social change caused by a water reuse project. While the people living in the vicinity are an obvious group, those who occasionally visit the area will also be affected, as in fact will those who never visit it but assign a value on the contin‐ued existence and quality of the environmental goods and services at stake. Indeed, the latter two groups often outnumber the first, though the value they assign to the environmental goods or services may be lower.  Hedonic  and  Travel  Cost methods,  for  example,  have  limitations  in measuring  these  “non‐use” valuations. 

    Among available techniques, also the so‐called benefit transfer poses limitations to an accurate valuation of  environmental  changes.  Sometimes  policy  makers  require  cost‐benefit  analyses  to  be  undertaken, without wishing to commit the time and resources to analyse directly the benefits or costs arising from the  specific project.  In  these  cases,  valuations  are generally  taken  from studies undertaken elsewhere, applying a technique known as “Benefit Transfer”. Methodological issues with Benefit Transfer have pro‐voked a lively debate and empirical testing (Brower and Spaninks, 1999). A notable case in the UK was the 1998 Public  Inquiry  into a proposal  to extract borehole water  from near  the River Kennet  in Wiltshire, located  in an area of outstanding natural beauty and a site of special scientific  interest. The  inquiry re‐jected the Environment Agency’s CBA on the proposal, which had based its valuations on a Benefits Man‐ual prepared by the Foundation for Water Research (1996). This example indicates that there is the need to calibrate values of benefits and costs that have been taken from elsewhere. 

     

    Site specificity/demand driven assessments 

    In general, application of CBA is  in fact very site and case specific.   A lot depends on who are the users and suppliers, what types of water quality is expected and desired, what level of technological innovation is in place and can be put in place. Thus, every case study has to be analyzed from a demand‐driven per‐spective. In the literature, many case studies can be found, but no universal tool has been developed for the moment as CBA is site‐specific.  

    In the case of water reuse, developing new techniques for cost benefit analysis or customization of exist‐ing approaches is particularly important in order to adapt them to the local situations (Kihila et al., 2014).  

    The link between supply of wastewater and demand for treated wastewater should be carefully investi‐gated, so that users and beneficiaries can be identified. Some costs and benefits of a water reuse project can also be site‐specific. The analysis of the previous models or approaches for cost‐benefit analysis indi‐cates that most of them do not comprehensively account for all the cost and benefit elements for water reuse in irrigation or for other users. Hence, customization of the most appropriate model is necessary. 

     

  • 17 

     Deliverable D4.3

    2.4 ExistingCBATool:theWaterReuseFoundationToolkitBesides  approaches  and  frameworks,  a  specific  Tool  (based  on  excel  spreadsheets) was  developed  for carrying out CBA for water reuse projects.  

    The Water Reuse Foundation developed an economic framework to support water managers in the iden‐tification,  estimation  and  communication  of  the  costs  and  benefits  of  water  reuse.  In  particular  this framework: (i) described the full range of market and non‐market costs and benefits of water reuse pro‐jects; (ii) developed approaches to value benefits and costs; and (iii) assigned unitary monetary value to costs and benefits. On this basis, the Water Reuse Foundation developed a spreadsheet model for use by local planners: key variables for water, wastewater and water reuse projects can be entered, and the Tool provides appropriate monetary values for cumulative benefits and costs.  

    This Tool was thoroughly analysed in the context of this project, and served as a source of inspiration for the development of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool. 

     

     

       

  • 18 

     DEMOWARE GA No. 619040

    3 BuildingthebackboneoftheDEMOWARECBAToolThe DEMOWARE CBA Tool aims at addressing current challenges and shortcomings of the application of CBA to water reuse projects. In particular: 

    The Tool is specifically designed and customized for implementing CBA for water reuse projects, thus reflecting their characteristics and specificities; 

    As mentioned earlier, the application of CBA to water reuse project is very site and case specific. Thus a CBA tool must be flexible enough so that its application can be customized to the specific case under evaluation; 

    In addition,  the  tool must  facilitate  the evaluation of water  reuse projects by assisting decision makers  and/or  plant  managers  in  gathering  data  input,  calculating  indicators  and  providing graphic representations of results. 

    To achieve the first two objectives, the Tool must be built on an appropriate conceptual and methodolog‐ical  framework.  A  framework  provides  principles  and  practices  to  conduct  a  cost‐benefit  analysis.  For example the Guide to Cost‐Benefit Analysis of Investment Projects published by the European Commission (EC, 2014b) is a sort of framework. It provides backbone on how to conduct an analysis. Step by step, the reader is guided through tasks and functions needed to conduct an effective CBA. 

    This  framework  is a specific adaptation  for water reuse project of  the widely accepted methodology of cost‐benefit analysis. It provides insights on what to take into account in the procedure and how to trans‐form and  combine data  to  sort  useful  indicators.  Those  indicators  are  then used  to  compare different project and select the one providing the largest level of welfare. 

    However,  in order  to compare  the efficiency of different projects  (or project options)  in providing wel‐fare, the exact same methodology needs to be used. For example, when comparing cost‐benefits ratio of two projects, the indirect effects must be taken into account for both projects, or otherwise nothing can be inferred on such a comparison. To avoid bias, a framework has to define boundaries of what is includ‐ed and what is not. What is inside these boundaries can be named a system.  

    A system is defined by stakeholders and flows between them. There are four main stakeholders in a wa‐ter reuse system: consumers, producers (fresh water and reclaimed water), State and the environment. Those four main stakeholders have interaction through flows such as goods (water), payments and pollu‐tion. Consumers need to pay producers in order to enjoy specific water quality and quantity. Producers need to cover their costs with the payments of consumers and with state subsidies. The costs of produc‐ing reclaimed water depend on the different processes involved, as well as on output water quality ‐the cleaner is the water the more expensive is the treatment. Producing reclaimed water has environmental costs and benefits that need to be taken into account. 

    A system is composed by stakeholders of the project and the different flows binding them. Stakeholders are interacting through those flows. 

    Such flows can be:  

    1. Money transfer such as payment, fees and taxes; 2. Flows of goods between producers and consumers; 3. Externality created by the consumption or the production (pollution). 

    Once boundaries of the system are set, and flows between stakeholders are known, listing of costs and benefits can be conducted enabling the user to calculate indicators to help decision. 

    The framework described here aims to provide a specific system for the projects of water reuse, but it is general  enough  to  take  into  account  a  diversity  of  situations.  This  framework  helps  different  users  to conduct a cost‐benefit analysis of water reuse projects in a comparable way. 

  • 19 

     Deliverable D4.3

    The DEMOWARE CBA Tool was developed on a conceptual and methodological framework built on two levels: 

    1. Generic water  reuse  system  framework:  this  layer  defines  and  designs  a  generic water  reuse system so that it can include  different treatment processes, different water sources and different uses of treated wastewater. This system is as generic as possible so that it can be adapted to each specific site, and it constitutes the basic layer upon which the DEMOWARE CBA Tool is built; 

    2. Cost‐benefit analysis  framework:  the second  layer of  the DEMOWARE CBA Tool  it defines and designs the different steps to be followed in CBA, and it allow for representing all flows occurring among stakeholders and physical components of the system (physical flows such as wastewater and treated water, financial flows, flows of non‐monetary costs and benefits). 

    These two layers constitute the backbone of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool.  In addition, the Tool must also support and guide decision makers  in  the evaluation of water  reuse project:  to do  this,  a user‐friendly interface must be built. The user interface is thus the third layer of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool: it rests on this two‐layer conceptual and methodological framework, as illustrated in Figure 1 below. 

     

    Figure 1 The three layers of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool

    This chapter  illustrates  in detail  these two  layers composing the conceptual and methodological  frame‐work which underlies the DEMOWARE CBA Tool. The user interface is described in the next chapter. 

    Please note that the current version of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool is to be considered as preliminary: the Tool  is  in  fact being tested  in two case studies (Sabadell and Braunschweig), and further testing will be done before the end of the project. Based on the outcomes of the testing phase, shortcomings and limi‐tations of the Tool will be addressed whenever possible. The final version of the CBA Tool will be made available before the end of the DEMOWARE project. 

     

     

  • 20 

     DEMOWARE GA No. 619040

    3.1 Waterreusecost‐benefitsframework: settingagenericwaterreusesystemtoframetheanalysis

    3.1.1 Settingboundariesofthesystemanddescribingflowsandstakeholders

    The description of the system is based on a simplified diagram of water flows between stakeholders as depicted in Figure 2. This diagram is then used to describe the different flows such as payment and exter‐nalities (pollution). Each time a table is used to provide a quick description of the stakeholders and how to describe them in the specified dimension. 

     

    Figure 2 Flows and stakeholder relation in water reuse systems

    On the consumer side (yellow box) there are five different customers. A customer is an agent (person or institution) that consumes water for a precise need. In the case of reused water, several customer groups can be  identified,  depending on  the  final  use:  domestic water  for  potable use  and domestic water  for toilet flushing and gardening, agricultural use for fresh food production (direct consumption) or agricul‐tural use for  industrial crops,  industrial use for high pressure boiling or  industrial use for cooling tower, environmental  uses  (e.g.  wetland  restoration/  creation,  improvement  of  river  quality;  in  the  case,  the environment can be said to be a customer). Those different customers have different needs  in term of water quality. For example, water for potable use needs to be of better quality than water for agricultural use. A very high water quality can be used for every use that needs high quality water, but also for uses that need a lower quality. This is the common baseline situation. Users are buying high water quality even for uses that doesn't need such quality. The challenge is to match the quality needed for the consumer and the quality provided by the supplier.  

    On the production side, there are three different suppliers (blue boxes). Fresh water sources combined with water pumping and treatment units are the traditional suppliers of water. They provide high water quality for potable use. But some of that water is used for less quality‐demanding use such as toilet flush‐ing, cleaning, etc… 

  • 21 

     Deliverable D4.3

    Alternatives sources of water are private wells. Their quality and the amount of consumption is unknown because some of  these well are not declared. For some  industrial use, wells are normally declared and can be taken into account. 

    The  last source of water  is  the reclaimed water coming from the treatment plant. The treatment plant can provide different water quality levels to different users. The water quality depends on the treatment process.  Sometimes,  the  treatment plant provides  only  one water quality, which  is  good enough  for  a many possible uses. In addition, another set of pipeline is needed to distribute reclaimed water because it is not as clean as fresh water. 

    3.1.2 Paymentflows

    Different payment flows between the different stakeholders of water reuse systems can be mapped as depicted  in  Figure 3.  In  this diagram  there are  six new  stakeholders  that  take part  in  the  system. Two stakeholders ‐water treatment plant and water company‐ are included in the diagram because they are the managing entity of the treatment plant of grey water and the treatment unit of fresh water. The oth‐er new stakeholders are the state, the population of the state, the suppliers of the water treatment plant and the suppliers of the treatment unit. 

     

    Figure 3 Payment flows in water reuse systems

    As previously seen, consumers can receive water from three different sources (fresh water from the wa‐ter company, reclaimed water from the water treatment plant company, water from privately managed well). Different pricing schemes apply to these three different sources.   

    A pricing scheme is often composed by a fixed part and a variable part. The fixed part is paid on an annual basis to the supplier. It is paid every year. The variable part depends on water consumption by each con‐sumer. Ideally, the final price of water (fixed + variable components) should reflect the costs of providing this water: according to this principle, high‐quality recycled water could be more expensive than conven‐tional water of the same quality level, as its provision can involve additional treatment procedures. How‐ever,  in  this  case consumers are  likely  to opt  for conventional water, and this could be  in conflict with water efficiency objectives –in fact, using recycled water increases the overall efficiency of the system. To 

  • 22 

     DEMOWARE GA No. 619040

    overcome this, freshwater price schemes and reclaimed water price schemes can be set in coordination, so  that  funds  transfers  can  be  created  between  the  water  company  and  the  water  treatment  plant through state taxes in order to achieve full cost recovery. Such a balance needs to be found by predicting evolution of consumption and prices and cross prices elasticities.  

    However,  in many cases  taxpayers do not match with  freshwater users and  recycled water users:  con‐sumers are only a part of the total population. Thus a part of that population paying taxes for enabling the water treatment plant to operate even though they do not uses water sources belonging to the sys‐tem being analysed (because they are not located in the operational area of the studied water company and the water treatment plant). In this situation, there is no full cost recovery, and the water system (in‐cluding conventional and recycled water) need public subsidies to operate. 

    3.1.3 SupplierCostmappingandwatertreatment

    The different costs occurring to the different suppliers are mapped (Figure 4). In the diagram, we can see that water  treatment  processes  (or water  pumping  and  production)  are  linked  to  the  customer.  Thus, each process has its own cost and exists to serve a specific customer group. 

     

    Figure 4 Supplier cost mapping of a water reuse system

    Knowing this, we can define a process and a treatment unit. A process  is a chain of treatment units. At the end of the process, the water has reached the quality needed by the customer that is served. A pro‐cess’s overall cost is then the sum of the costs of all treatment units for a given amount of treated water (or pumped water). In this diagram, the water company has only one process made of 2 units (pumping unit and treatment unit), and the water treatment plant has 5 processes where each are composed by a different number of treatment units. For example, process A has three different treatment unit (First and second treatment, A1, A2 and A3). 

    A treatment unit is a (mechanical, chemical, radiative) water treatment process that takes water of a cer‐tain  quality,  improves  that water  quality  in  one  or more  quality  dimensions  (quantity  of  bacteria,  sus‐pended solid, viruses, minerals...) and pumps out that treated water. Multiple treatment units are needed in a process because only one treatment unit cannot provide enough improvement on all water quality 

  • 23 

     Deliverable D4.3

    dimensions. Thus, each treatment unit is specialized in treating few quality criteria. This is another reason explaining why a succession of treatment units is needed in a process of water treatment. 

    Each treatment unit has specific costs. Such costs can be divided  into two categories:  investment costs and operational costs. These two types of costs are further divided into two categories: labor unit needed to operate or build the treatment unit (multiplied by salary) and inputs (multiplied by costs of each kind of  inputs). For the  investment costs,  the overall cost  is given by the effective building of the treatment unit. For the operational costs, the overall cost is related to a given amount of treated water. Each treat‐ment unit needs a defined minimum quantity of water to operate, a defined maximum capacity of treat‐ment and an average quantity of treated water. 

    It is interesting to note that, as for the first and second treatment, a treatment unit can provide water for different processes. Another element to take  into account  is the cost of building and maintaining pipes for  each  use.  Such  cost  can  be  calculated  by multiplying  a  cost  for  a  given  distance  of maintaining  or building a pipe multiplied by the overall distance. 

    This way of mapping costs makes  it easier  to compare costs of processes with revenues resulting  from water tariffs paid by consumers, and it also shows whether full cost recovery (without state intervention) is occurring. Indeed, we know which amounts are paid by consumers (see payments flows diagram) for a given amount of water and what are costs of the process of treating the same given amount of water for that  consumer.  As we  saw  earlier,  there  are  fixed  costs  and  variable  costs  (annual  payment  for  reim‐bursement of  investment  costs  could be defined as  fixed  costs) as well  as  fixed  fees and variable pay‐ments  from  customers  (depending  on  quantity  of water  consumed).  Thus,  it  is  easy  to  compare  fixed costs and fixed revenues with the best situation is where fixed revenues are recovering fixed costs. 

    Furthermore,  as  previously  seen, water  quality  can  be  defined  by  different  dimension.  Each  customer needs a water quality standard. A water quality standard is defined with lowest (and sometimes highest) boundaries of various water quality determinants (e.g. BOD, COD, N, pH, etc.). 

    The environment  is  the  last  ‐but not  the  least‐  stakeholder  that  is not yet  represented  in  the diagram. Avoiding water  shortages  during drought periods  is  not  the only  benefits  of water  reuse. Water  reuse generates also other environmental benefits. Depending on the characteristics of a specific water treat‐ment plant and the geographical settings, those benefits could be significant or marginal. On the other hand, water reuse can also generate costs.  

    On the cost side, for example, operating a water treatment plant produces CO2 emissions. Using the flow diagram for cost mapping, we see that a water treatment plant hosts multiple processes. These processes are a chain of treatment units. We saw earlier that each treatment unit is characterized different mone‐tary costs. It is possible to add another layer of cost within each treatment unit. For example, when build‐ing the treatment unit, some energy needs to be used. Production of that energy could involve CO2 emis‐sions and CO2 can be monetized. The international market price of CO2 tons can be retrieved and use to calculate the total costs. The exact same reasoning can be applied to the energy used to operate treat‐ment units for a given amount of treated water. 

    The chemical mechanisms needed to operate treatment units are another source of environmental costs. These mechanisms can emit CO2 (or other carbon dioxide equivalent gases). Such emissions need to be taken into account. 

    Furthermore, there might be additional environmental costs associated with pollutant emissions. Some‐times  it  is  not  possible  to  assign  a  monetary  value  to  these  emissions.  For  example,  operating  some treatment units could generate types of waste that cannot be monetized. Amount in kilograms of dispos‐als created for a given amount of treated water needs to be known. 

  • 24 

     DEMOWARE GA No. 619040

    On the benefit side, water reuse can generate benefits linked to a less intensive use of water pumping, creation of downstream habitat and environmental restoration. 

    3.2 WaterreuseCBAframeworkOnce the generic system is built, the second step in the setting up of the DEMOWARE CBA Tool was the development of the CBA Framework.  In other words, the framework is the underlying logic of the Tool, and it established the logical order of the operations executed by the Tool, as well as the overall method‐ology applied by the Tool when conducting the CBA. 

    Within the DEMOWARE CBA Tool, the cost‐benefit analysis is conducted following four steps:  

    1) Project identification, socio‐economic context and mapping of institutional context, definition of scenarios;  

    2) Financial analysis; 3) Economic analysis; and 4) Risk assessment and sensitivity analysis. 

    In the Tool, each step of the CBA is modelled on the generic water reuse system presented in the previ‐ous section. 

    First,  a water  reuse project  has  to be  identified.  Project  objectives  address previously  identified  issues about water (water shortage or scarcity, ecosystem pollution...). Then the socio‐economic context has to be described and issues must be sorted. In this description, the socio‐economic and institutional context needs to be simplified, so that it can be projected on the hydrological diagram presented in the previous section. Once the actual situation is mapped, the different most pertinent options for water reuse need to be described and mapped using the same system scheme. 

    The second step is the financial analysis. This step can be broken down in 3 stages:  

    1) Identification and accounting of costs and benefits 2) Discounting of costs and benefits; and 3) Calculation of financial performance. 

    To conduct the financial analysis, all the financial costs and benefits of the projects needs to be identified. Financial costs belong to two categories: operating costs and investment costs. Such costs must be identi‐fied and assessed for each proposed scenario and for each year of the lifetime of the project. Identically, revenues from reclaimed water and fresh water supply have to be estimated. Once such costs and reve‐nues are known several indicators are calculated: Financial Net Present Value and Financial Internal Rate of Return of the project of reclaiming water. 

    The third step is the economic analysis. The economic analysis is carried out following five steps:  

    1)  Conversion of market prices to accounting prices; 2) Monetary valuation of non‐market impacts; 3) Inclusion of additional indirect effects; 4) Discounting of the estimated costs and benefits; 5) Assessment (calculation) of the economic performance. 

    In some cases, market prices can differ  from accounting price  inducing bias  in  the results of  the costs‐benefits analysis. Such prices thus need to be modified so that the economic analysis can be conducted. Non‐market impacts (in our case environmental and social impacts) have to be identified and monetized. Monetary valuation can be done with different methodology (price transfer, declared preference meth‐ods, revealed preferences methods). Still, not all impacts can be valued, and these must be kept in mind during the evaluation –and a quantitative measure, although non‐monetary, should also be provided. 

  • 25 

     Deliverable D4.3

    Economic costs and benefits are then discounted, and indicators of economic performance are calculat‐ed. 

    The last step aims at evaluating the resilience of the project to different shocks, such as for example price shock, increased costs, unplanned events, increasing investment needs, etc… 

    This step involves three phases:  

    Sensitivity analysis;  Options analysis;  Risk analysis. 

    The following sections describe in more detail each of these�

Click here to load reader

Reader Image
Embed Size (px)
Recommended