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Education Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys- MICS3 Analysis and Report Writing Workshop Panama...

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Education Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys- MICS3 Analysis and Report Writing Workshop Panama City, July 12-20, 2006 Slide 2 Slide 3 Indicators Participation 1.Pre-school attendance 2.School readiness 3.Net intake rate in primary education 4.Net primary school attendance rate 5.Net secondary school attendance rate 6.Female to male education ratio (gender parity index-GPI) Progression 1.Survival rate to grade five 2.Transition rate to secondary school 3.Net primary completion rate 4.Adult literacy rate Slide 4 Goals World Fit for Children (WFFC) Providing quality education Early childhood education Children out of school and alternative education Numeracy, literacy and essential life skills Adult literacy Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Achieve universal primary education Promote gender equality and empower women Slide 5 Why to measure education? Reasons: Provide a comprehensive description of childrens participation and progression in the education system To evaluate impact of programs and interventions based on trends Slide 6 Data sources Administrative records Population census School surveys Household surveys Slide 7 Are there differences? if yes why? Existing evidence: Different concepts and definitions (enrolment versus attendance) Deficient administrative records Measurement errors Slide 8 Which is the approach in MICS3? Estimation of indicators based on household survey to inform data from administrative records Use other existing estimates and compare along time Report within the existing context of data availability and limitations Slide 9 Slide 10 Which countries included this module in MICS3? 6 out of 7 Belize, Dominican Republic, Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago Cuba included part of the module only Mongolia? Slide 11 Pre-school net attendance ratio Numerator: Number of children aged 36-59 months that attend some form of early childhood education programme Denominator: Total number of children aged 36-59 months surveyed Slide 12 Slide 13 BIRTH REGISTRATION AND EARLY LEARNING MODULEBR BR1. Does (name) have a birth certificate? May I see it? Yes, seen1 Yes, not seen2 No3 DK8 1 BR5 BR2. Has ( names ) birth been registered with the civil authorities? Yes1 No2 DK8 1 BR5 8 BR4 BR3. Why is ( names ) birth not registered?Costs too much [I1] 1 [I1] Must travel too far2 Did not know it should be registered3 Did not want to pay fine4 Does not know where to register5 Other ( specify )6 DK8 BR4. Do you know how to register your childs birth? Yes1 No2 BR5. Check age of child in UF11: Child is 3 or 4 years old? Yes. Continue with BR6 No. Go to BR8 BR6. Does ( name ) attend any organized learning or early childhood education programme, such as a private or government facility, including kindergarten or community child care? Yes1 No2 DK8 2 BR8 8 BR8 BR7. Within the last seven days, about how many hours did ( name ) attend? No. of hours__ __ [I1] Adapt code categories to locally-relevant ones and pre-test.[I1] Slide 14 Methodological issues The results are presented for 3-4 years only It is possible to estimate pre-school participation for 5-6 years old from data collected with the household questionnaire However, these numbers are not comparable mainly because pre-school participation not always include non-formal early learning centers Slide 15 School readiness Numerator: Number of children in first grade that attended some form of pre-school the previous year Denominator: Total number of children in the first grade surveyed Slide 16 SPSS Program Generates basic table: ED.1 Generates: the percentage of 3 and 4 year old attending early education: total and by background variables the percentage of children attending first grade who attended ECE the year before Slide 17 Slide 18 Net intake rate in primary education Numerator: Number of children of primary school-entry age that are currently attending first grade Denominator: Total number of children of primary-school entry age surveyed Slide 19 Slide 20 SPSS Program Generates basic table: ED.2 Percentage of children of primary school-entry age that are currently attending first grade Slide 21 Slide 22 Primary school net attendance rate Numerator: Number of children of primary-school age currently attending primary or secondary school Denominator: Total number of children of primary-school age surveyed Note: the primary school age is defined at the country level and agreed at the international level via ISCED1 Slide 23 Primary school ages according to ISCED1 Belize5-10 Cuba6-11 Dominican Republic6-11 Guyana 6-11 Jamaica6-11 Suriname6-11 Trinidad and Tobago 5-11 Mongolia8-11 Slide 24 Slide 25 SPSS Program Generates basic table: ED.3 Percentage of children of primary-school age currently attending primary or secondary school Slide 26 Slide 27 Secondary school net attendance rate Numerator: Number of children of secondary-school age currently attending secondary or tertiary school Denominator: Total number of children of secondary-school age surveyed Note: the secondary school age is defined at the country level and agreed at the international level via ISCED2 Slide 28 Secondary school ages according to ISCED2 Belize11-16 Cuba12-16 Dominican Republic13-17 Guyana 12-16 Jamaica12-16 Suriname12-17 Trinidad and Tobago 12-16 Mongolia12-17 Slide 29 Slide 30 SPSS Program Generates basic table: ED.4 Percentage of children of secondary school age currently attending secondary or tertiary school Slide 31 Slide 32 Methodological issues Results refer to attendance instead of enrolment In reality we should aim to measure attendance Enrolment tends to over estimate school participation Results refer to net attendance instead of gross Gross attendance in primary/secondary education includes children of no primary/no secondary education ages Gross attendance ratios can be greater than 100% Primary/secondary attendance ratios include children attending primary or higher/secondary or higher Slide 33 Female to male education ratio Gender parity index (GPI) Numerator: Girls net enrolment/attendance ratio in primary, secondary, or tertiary education Denominator: Boys net enrolment/attendance ratio in primary, secondary, or tertiary education Slide 34 Slide 35 Slide 36 SPSS Program Generates basic table: ED.7 Generates: gender parity index for primary net attendance ratios (girls/boys) gender parity index for secondary net attendance ratios (girls/boys) Slide 37 Slide 38 Methodological issues GPIs are based on net attendance ratios (primary/secondary) Sometimes GPIs are based on gross attendance/enrolment ratios (primary/secondary) Gross ratios are mostly used when data is not available by age of the child Net is preferred over gross because it describes better the situation in terms to gender equality (the ideal situation) Gross ratios are useful when children are not attending the grade that corresponds to their age Slide 39 A holistic approach To better describe school participation we propose: Look at primary and secondary together Use the following 3 simple indicators: Primary net attendance ratio Secondary net attendance ratio Percentage of secondary school age children that are attending primary school Present analysis of school participation (levels and GPI) in a comprehensive way rather than primary and secondary separated Slide 40 Population 6-17 5,228 Children 6-11 Primary (A) School = 2559 Out of primary school = 146 Attending primary School = 2,413 (B) Children 12-17 Secondary (C) School = 2,669 Attending (D) School = 2,177 Attending primary school = 1,085 (E) Attending Secondary (F) School = 1,092 Not attending School = 492 Using Gross ratios: PGAR = (B+E)/A = (2,413+ 1,085)/2,559=137% Using Net Ratios: PNAR = B/A = 2,413/2,559 = 94% SNAR = F/C = 1,092/2,669 = 41% Ratio of SAP/PS = E/C = 1,085/2,669 = 41% Slide 41 The analysis then produces Primary education among children 6-11years of age: 94% attend primary or higher 6% do not attend primary education Secondary education among children 12-17: 41% attend secondary or higher 41% attend primary education 18% do not attend school In total, we have that 24% of the children 6-17 years of age are out of school Slide 42 Slide 43 Survival rate to grade five Definition: Proportion of children entering the first grade of primary school that eventually reach grade five Slide 44 Slide 45 Survival rate to grade 5 The percentage of children entering first grade of primary school who eventually reach grade 5 is calculated as the product of four probabilities: the probability that a child in grade 1 eventually reaches grade 2 the probability that a child in grade 2 eventually reaches grade 3 the probability that a child in grade 3 eventually reaches grade 4 the probability that a child in grade 4 eventually reaches grade 5 Slide 46 Example: to calculate the probability that a child in grade 1 eventually reaches grade 2 the number of children who are in 2nd grade of primary school at the time of the survey and who were in 1st grade last year is divided by: the number of children who were in 1st grade last year and graduated to 2nd grade or dropped out of school Slide 47 Children reaching grade 5 Slide 48 SPSS Program Generates basic table: ED.5 Probability that children who enter grade 1 of primary school, eventually reach grade 5 Slide 49 Slide 50 Methodological issues RG5 is an indicator with some degree of difficulty for both estimation and interpretation Note that in the current approach we exclude from our estimation children found to be repeating a grade under the assumption that their probability of dropping from school, repeating again, or promotion to the next grade is included in the other cohorts It measures the probability for children starting grade 1 to reach grade 5 and it is based on children that are participating in school It is used as a proxy for literacy among children Slide 51 Net primary completion ra

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