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MD-PhD Program HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL newsletter winter/spring 2007 vol. 18 no. 1 Leaders in Biomedicine Dr. Paul Nurse to Speak at the Program’s New Lecture Series U nder the sponsorship of the Harvard MD-PhD Program, a new school- wide lecture series named “Leaders in Biomedicine” will feature Dr. Paul Nurse as the inaugural speaker on Thursday, March 15, 2007. The lec- ture will take place at 4:00 p.m. in the New Research Building of Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, Massachusetts. The title of Dr. Nurse’s presentation is “Great Ideas of Biology.” (see abstract in sidebar on page 2). Dr. Nurse shared the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, became president of The Rockefeller University in September 2003. He had previously served as chief execu- tive of Cancer Research UK, the largest cancer research organization outside the United States. Dr. Nurse is noted for his discoveries about the molecular machinery that regulates the cell cycle, the process by which a cell copies its genetic material and then divides to form two cells. In addition to the Nobel Prize, Dr. Nurse has received many other honors, including the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research and the Royal Society’s Wellcome, Royal and Copley medals. A fellow of the Royal Society, he is a founding member of the U.K. Academy of Medical Sciences, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a foreign member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. He was knighted in 1999 and received France’s Légion d’Honneur in 2002. A special lunch seminar for students to meet 2 IRENE CHEN 6 LEADERSHIP 7 CAMARADERIE & CAREERS 9 CARTOON BY RAPOPORT 10 FOR THE RECORD Contents Our MD-PhD class is simply crazy about medicine and science. OBSERVANT bystanders may abbreviate the previ- ous to “simply crazy,” especially if they had wit- nessed the antics of our pre-matriculation summer together. They are entitled to their opinion. From marauding through the TMEC dressed up as pirates on our first day of summer class to run- ning wild through the streets of New York, we bonded over cultural dinners, coffee shop runs, dancing in Boston, and endless candid/hammed- up photography. Oh and of course, there was sci- ence, with discussions of late night benchwork and our latest Nature read- ings. After the summer our class, tightly bonded, enthusias- tic, and often irrev- erent, was ready (or not) to tack- le…MEDICINE when the school year began. We are a group with varied interests and backgrounds, drawn together by a common passion for basic science, clinical medicine, and free food. Our parents hail from seven different countries. We have worked with organisms that range in genome size from 30,000 to 3,000,000,000 base pairs. We have birthdays in ten of the twelve months. And our dorm rooms can be found on five of the six floors of Vanderbilt Hall. These are but a few examples that underscore the fact that our class simply defies all conventional labels. The Entering Class of 2006 Crazy About Medicine Portrait of the artist The portraits of the entering class of 2006 shown on the following pages were drawn by MD-PhD artist-in-residence Erin Chen, with a guest appearance by Cameron Sadegh to draw the master artist herself (above). continued on page 3 continued on page 2
Transcript
REVHarvMDPhDNwsltr23Mar07MD-PhDProgram HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL
n e w s l e t t e r winter/spring 2007 vol. 18 no. 1
continued
Leaders in Biomedicine Dr. Paul Nurse to Speak at the Program’s New Lecture Series
Under the sponsorship of the Harvard MD-PhD Program, a new school-
wide lecture series named “Leaders in Biomedicine” will feature Dr. Paul
Nurse as the inaugural speaker on
Thursday, March 15, 2007. The lec-
ture will take place at 4:00 p.m. in the
New Research Building of Harvard
Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis
Pasteur, Boston, Massachusetts. The
“Great Ideas of Biology.” (see abstract
in sidebar on page 2).
Dr. Nurse shared the 2001 Nobel
Prize in Physiology or Medicine,
became president of The Rockefeller
University in September 2003. He
had previously served as chief execu-
tive of Cancer Research UK, the
largest cancer research organization
outside the United States. Dr. Nurse is noted for his discoveries about the
molecular machinery that regulates the cell cycle, the process by which a cell
copies its genetic material and then divides to form two cells.
In addition to the Nobel Prize, Dr. Nurse has
received many other honors, including the Albert
Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research and the
Royal Society’s Wellcome, Royal and Copley
medals. A fellow of the Royal Society, he is a
founding member of the U.K. Academy of
Medical Sciences, a fellow of the American
Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a foreign
member of the U.S. National Academy of
Sciences. He was knighted in 1999 and received
France’s Légion d’Honneur in 2002.
A special lunch seminar for students to meet
2 IRENE CHEN
Our MD-PhD class is simply crazy about medicine and science.
OBSERVANT bystanders may abbreviate the previ-
ous to “simply crazy,” especially if they had wit-
nessed the antics of our pre-matriculation summer
together. They are entitled to their opinion. From
marauding through the TMEC dressed up as
pirates on our first day of summer class to run-
ning wild through the streets of New York, we
bonded over cultural dinners, coffee shop runs,
dancing in Boston, and endless candid/hammed-
up photography. Oh and of course, there was sci-
ence, with discussions of late night benchwork
and our latest Nature read-
ings. After the summer
birthdays in ten of the twelve months. And our
dorm rooms can be found on five of the six floors
of Vanderbilt Hall. These are but a few examples
that underscore the fact that our class simply
defies all conventional labels.
Crazy About Medicine
class of 2006 shown on the following pages
were drawn by MD-PhD artist-in-residence
Erin Chen, with a guest appearance
by Cameron Sadegh to draw the
master artist herself (above).
cont inued on page 3 cont inued on page 2
2 HARVARD MD-PHD PROGRAM n e w s l e t t e r
NEW LECTURE SERIES c o n t i n u e d f r o m p a g e 1
with Dr. Nurse is also planned for the day Athar
Malik, Year 2, will facilitate what is sure to be a lively
discussion in advance of Dr. Nurse’s lecture in the
afternoon.
Christopher A. Walsh, MD, PhD, Bullard Professor
of Neurology and director of the MD-PhD Program
since 2003, is to provide students and members of
the HMS academic community with direct exposure
to a wide range of existing leaders in contemporary
biomedicine by offering a public lecture series in
which such individuals are invited to speak on a sub-
ject of general interest. The MD-PhD Program antic-
ipates an enthusiastic response from the students and
the HMS community who participate in the first lec-
ture of the “Leaders in Biomedicine Series.”
Irene Chen Named Winner of the Grand Prize of the GE & Science for Young Life Scientists
IRENE CHEN, Harvard MD-PhD class of 2007,
was awarded the Grand Prize for her paper on
“The Emergence of Cells During the Origin of
Life.” She received the award and the $25,000
prize money from Peter Ehrenheim, President
of GE Healthcare Life Sciences and Monica
Bradford, executive editor of the journal
Science.
Scientists was established twelve years ago
by GE Healthcare, formerly Pharmacia, and
Science Magazine together with its parent
organization/publisher AAAS to help bring sci-
ence to life by recognizing outstanding PhDs
from around the world and rewarding their
research in the field of molecular biology.
The prizes were awarded at Stockholm’s Grand
Hotel, the venue of the original Nobel Prize
ceremony in 1901, on December 11, 2006.
ABSTRACT OF
Three of the ideas of biology are the gene the-
ory, the theory of evolution by natural selec-
tion, and the proposal that the cell is the fun-
damental unit of all life.When considering the
question of “what is life?”, these ideas come
together because the special way cells repro-
duce provides the conditions by which natural
selection takes place allowing living organisms
to evolve. A fourth idea is that the organiza-
tion of chemistry within the cell provides
explanations for life’s phenomena. A new idea
is the nature of biological self organization on
which living cells and organisms process infor-
mation and acquire specific forms.
3HARVARD MD-PHD PROGRAM n e w s l e t t e r
Below are accurate portraits and brief autobiographies that describe each of the members of the first year MD-PhD class. We wrote these ourselves, but deftly employed the third person to convey a sense of deep significance and import.”
Jonathan Abraham was born in Montreal, and raised in a nearby city called Laval in Quebec, Canada. In 1998, his family moved to Queens, NY. He went to Harvard as an undergrad and studied biochemistry. In his free time, Jonathan likes to speak “freole” or “frenglish”—mix- tures of French and Haitian Creole, and French and English, although he quickly loses track—with his three brothers and parents. Jonathan’s other hobbies include martial arts, and importantly, poking fun at gullible people.
Milena Andzelm was born in Canada just after her par- ents emigrated from Poland. In an effort to gain Milena her third passport, everyone moved to the United States where Milena grew up in San Diego, aptly named America’s Finest City. Milena came to Harvard for col- lege, where she concentrated in Biochemical Sciences and researched
the molecular mechanisms of Natural Killer cell immune synapse formation. Perhaps because the
past winter was unseasonably warm in Boston, Milena decided to stay on the east coast for her MD-PhD. She still loves immunology, but could stray as far as chemistry for her PhD, and keeps coming up with exciting new research areas to explore. In the carefree days
of her first year in the HST program, Milena likes to find new running routes on this side of the river, continuously prove that you can walk everywhere in Boston, bake (but not cook), and
spend time with her super smart, entertaining, and generally fabulous fellow MD-Phders.
Erin Chen was born in Beijing and grew up in Utah and Connecticut. She experienced the “life of the mind” at the University of Chicago while studying molecular biology and math, researching stem cell regeneration of skeletal muscle in the McNally lab, and painting. For her graduate work, Erin would like to apply both computational and experimental approaches to investigate molecular circuitry.
In her free time, Erin likes making art, playing the piano, cooking really good food (and then eating it), and
galvanizing her colleagues into dressing like pirates.
Sarah Hill was born and raised in Bismarck, North Dakota. She got her AB in biochemical sciences from Harvard College in 2005 and her MSc in biochemistry from Oxford
University on a Rhodes Scholarship in 2006. Sarah is scientifically inter- ested in chromosome molecular structure and dynamics during the cell cycle and after damage. She will likely pursue a PhD in some form of cancer biology. Aside from science Sarah loves running marathons, golfing, seeing movies, and going to the theater in London and New York.
Stephen Huffaker was born in Boulder, Colorado where his life revolved around hiking, skiing, camp-
ing, sailing, family, and enjoying life. When he was 17 his family moved to Crawfordsville, Indiana where his parents live today (despite pleas from Steve and his sister to move back to a more topographically interesting locale). Still missing the granola-head lifestyle, he went to University of Wisconsin-Madison for undergrad
and thoroughly enjoyed his three-year tenure there despite the ice age temperatures. More recently, he completed his PhD in spring of this year at the University of Cambridge and the National Institutes of Health focus- ing on the genetics and molecular biology of schizophrenia. Steve is now a “guinea pig” student in a new MSTP partnered program through the NIH, Cambridge, Oxford, and Harvard. Though he’s obviously a glutton for
punishment, it takes little convincing for him to drop the books and head outdoors, particularly in the snow.
Mark Lee grew up in the quiet town of Mountain Top, PA, where he has fond memories of biking around the neighborhood and reading Hemingway. At an early point in his life, he could be quoted
as saying that he either wanted to be a philosopher or a theoretical physicist. As it turned out, he became fascinated by biology at Yale, did research on regulatory RNA molecules in the Breaker lab, and graduated with a BS/MS degree
The Entering Class of 2006
CRAZY ABOUT MEDICINE c o n t i n u e d f r o m p a g e 1
**The entering class of 2006 would like to thank the
entering class of 2004 for their wit and humor in
writing intro paragraphs for MD-PhD newsletters,
from which we have borrowed liberally.
4 HARVARD MD-PHD PROGRAM n e w s l e t t e r
in molecular biophysics and bio- chemistry. He spent the next year
at the Dana-Farber studying HIV, and is currently interested in infec-
tious diseases and immunology. He feels honored to be a part of such an
amazing class of future physician-scientists, and as the unofficial photographer, is in the
process of documenting their audacious, crazy journey together.
Karolina Maciag was born in Plock, Poland. Once a medieval capital rife with
kings and dukes, the city and its refin- ery are now rife with. . .organic chemists.
Count three of four of her grandparents among the latter—it must be science in the genes. Karolina moved to the Washington, DC area with her parents as a child. At Harvard College, she enjoyed her research project, investigating mechanisms of RNA processing using computational systems biology, so much that she stayed in the lab for a full year after graduating in 2004, rendering the University’s efforts to get rid of her by granting a “diploma” in vain. Her interest in infectious disease immunology and global health led her to spend the subsequent half year volunteering in rural medical
clinics in Guatemala, on a Radcliffe Fellowship. Grateful that lab science is a mobile skill, Karolina returned to Europe to do more computational biolo- gy research in the remain- ing half year. She’s now glad to be back in Boston, where she is working to find a synthesis of her research interests. Beyond lab/class, she enjoys hiking, tennis, and many outdoor sports, good books, and visiting her kid brother.
Devarati Mitra is not quite sure where she’s from, though her best guess is somewhere between Northern California, Belgium and Washington DC. She graduated last year from Stanford University where she studied biology and political science. Her excitement for research was sparked while studying the mechanism of protein translocation at the National Institute of Health, though since then she has also worked on nuclear transport and DNA repair. Her current research interest is focused on neurodegenerative disease though given her track record so far it’s very possible that will be subject to change. So far she’s been having a great time exploring Boston, getting to know her amazing classmates and looking forward to the rest of her time here at HMS.
Yin Ren grew up in China and moved to the true north of the great land of Canada when he was fifteen. He came to Boston and attended
MIT, not knowing that he would stay here for another 12 years. He majored in Course VI
(electrical engineering and computer science) because the stuff he learned was really fun. Later, he found out that bio-electrical engi- neering was even more fun, so he did research in several different areas such as using microfluidics and bioMEMS to study biomolecules, engineering circuits for image-
guided radiation therapy, and designing robotics to model breathing and the delivery of radiation.
He is not exactly sure how an engineer like himself became so interested in MD-PhD, and he is still try-
ing to figure out what he wants to do in the future. His current interests are applying bioMEMS and nanoparticles to study and cure cancer. In his free time, he likes to play a lot of
soccer and basketball, cheer on the Pistons, sleep, eat good food, meet new
people, and read Science and Nature.
Cameron Sadegh graduated from MIT this past June with bachelors in biology and chemical engineering. During his time at the ‘Tute, he competed on the gymnas- tics team, and in between crashes and injuries, he researched cell sig- naling in the Lodish Lab. Motivated by sports, research, and medicine, Cameron finds great interest in one day understanding what guides cellular and neuronal acrobatics!
Editor Linda Burnley
Designer Kathleen Sayre
This newsletter is published twice a year since it was first published in 1990.
©COPYRIGHT 2007
HARVARD COLLEGE
www.hms.harvard.edu/md_phd
MD-PhD PROGRAM n e w s l e t t e r
PHOTO CREDITS: LINDA BURNLEY, AND MOSHE JAKUBOWSKI
HARVARD MD-PHD PROGRAM n e w s l e t t e r 5
Jenny Yang grew up in China where she had to trudge through snow, uphill (both ways), in order to get to school everyday. Then, one day, she saw the light when she and her family moved to the sunny hills of California to a city properly named Sunny Hills (of course), only to finally settle down in an even sunnier and even more beau- tiful city, San Diego. In 2006, Jenny graduated from UCLA with both a bachelors and a masters degree in molecular, cellular, and developmen- tal biology. Today, Jenny has made a full cir- cle and is back to trudging through snow for school, even if it is just across Longwood Ave. When the days get cold, Jenny often looks up residency options in CA; and when the schooling gets tough, she dreams of her other career aspirations: architect, fashion designer, food critic, talk show host, wedding planner, interior decorator, fortune- cookie-fortune writer, cancer-curer, and Nobel Prize winner. Channeling her nerdy side, Jenny, of course, is always dreaming about the science that she works on. She is honored to have such amazing people to call her colleagues and most importantly, her friends.
Amy Saltzman was born in Cleveland, Ohio, where her family has lived for the past three generations. She spent a lot of time doing genetics and biochemistry in high school, but in 2001, she left Cleveland to head further east for college. During her four years as an undergrad- uate at Princeton, she studied Anthropology and was able to travel to Fiji to focus on experiences of postpar- tum illness and motherhood among ethnic Fijian
women amidst the country’s rapid economic and social transitions. Before coming to
HMS, Amy’s interests in medi- cine, anthropology, and moth-
erhood drew her to South Africa to spend a year working for a non-
profit organization called moth- ers2mothers, which provides peer- based psychosocial support and edu- cation for pregnant women and new mothers who have recently been diagnosed with HIV. Here in Boston, Amy is part of the joint MD-PhD program in medical anthropology.
She is proud to be one of the few New Pathways MD-PhD students and thrilled to be a part of such
an inspiring group of MD-PhD candidates.
New students at orientation with MD-PhD Program faculty. Front row (L-R): Jenny Yang, Milena Andzelm, Karolina Maciag, Aurore Halkovich*, and Mark Lee. Middle row (L-R):
Devarati Mitra, Jonathan Abraham, Erin Chen, Yin Ren, Cameron Sadegh, and Sarah Hill. Back row (L-R): Jordan Kreidberg, Maria Rupnick, Linda Burnley, Joel Hirschhorn, Chris
Walsh, Steve Blacklow, and Xavier Moissett*. (*Visting students from INSERM)
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Gastroenterology”
Workshop on February 10-11 in Miami, FL. The workshop was co-
organized by Dr. Rick Blumberg of Brigham & Women’s Hospital and
sponsored by the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA)
Institute. It offered 20 MD-PhD students the opportunity to receive
thoughtful career guidance from senior academic physician-scientists
in the AGA, including AGA President Mark Donowitz. Highlights
included scientific talks, a primer on NIH funding opportunities for
junior scientists by Judith Podskalny of the NIDDK, and a night out on
South Beach with GI fellows and young faculty. MD-PhD student par-
ticipants ranged from some who remain completely undecided about a
clinical specialty to those actively pursuing gastroenterological research
— students, keep this meeting in mind for future years!
L E A D E R S H I P C H A N G E S
Having served for three years as director of the MD-PhD
Program, Christopher A. Walsh, MD, PhD has decided that new
responsibilities he has assumed at Children’s Hospital and in his
laboratory, will preclude him from continuing as director of the
basic-science track of the program. He stepped down effective
February 1, 2007. Dr. Walsh is continuing as Bullard Professor of
Neurology at HMS and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, as
Chief of the Division of Genetics at Children’s, and as a Howard
Hughes Investigator. He will also be leading a major new collabo-
rative research effort to understand autism.
According to Dr. Joseph Martin, the MD-PhD Program was
strengthened markedly during Dr. Walsh’s tenure. He fostered the
successful renewal of the MSTP grant, the launch of the social
sciences track of the program under the leadership of Dr. Allan
Brandt, and the identification of new sources of funding for stu-
dents who enter the program after the first two years. His active,
caring and effective mentoring will be remembered by the stu-
dents as hallmarks of his tenure. We are fortunate that he will
continue to be a part of our community.
We thank Dr. Walsh for his dedication and commitment and
wish him well in his continuing activities within the HMS com-
munity.
Stephen C. Blacklow, MD, PhD, associate professor of pathol-
ogy (BWH), is the interim director until a new director is
appointed.
will be to co-direct the summer course “Molecular Biology of
Human Disease.”
Shown above are the program leaders and staff as they gathered after an executive
committee lunch meeting on February 2, 2007 (front: Steve Blacklow, Chris Walsh,
Linda Burnley; back from left: Yi Shen, Mel Feany, Janelle O'Rourke, Maria Rupnick,
Robin Lichtenstein, Joel Hirschhorn).
Minority Recruitment Lilit Garibyan (left) and Jose Aleman (right) traveled with Linda Burnley to
Anaheim, California last November to
represent the program at the 6th Annual
Biomedical Research Conference for
al meeting designed to encourage under-
graduate and graduate students to pur-
sue advanced training in the biomedical
and behavioral sciences. It is the largest
professional conference for biomedical
students attracting approximately 2,600
students, 30 postdoctoral scientists and 750 faculty and adminis-
trators. Students come from over 285 U.S. colleges and universi-
ties. All are pursuing advanced training in the biomedical sciences,
and many have conducted independent research. Other partici-
pants from Harvard included Drs. James Hogle (Biophysics) and
Jocelyn Spragg (DMS) in addition to John McNally (HILS). The
next ABRCMS conference will be held November 7-10, 2007 in
Austin, Texas. Students or faculty interested in assisting in recruit-
ment for the MD-PhD Program should contact Linda Burnley.
6 HARVARD MD-PHD PROGRAM n e w s l e t t e r
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Poster Sessions 2006
Poster sessions are the life blood of any medical scientist train-
ing environment and the MD-PhD Program is no exception.
On any given week, students are invited to participate in pre-
senting or attending poster sessions. Shown below are some of
the posters exhibited at the MD-PhD Program/Joslin Diabetes
Poster session held on the HMS campus last August, 2006.
Marie Hollenhorst (left) – Synthetic
“Dynamics of Cohesin Chromosomal
Association (Nasmyth lab-Oxford, UK)
Regulatory T Cells (Mathis/
of Merlin in membrane organization”
(McClatchey lab)
PHOTOS BY MOSHE JAKUBOWSKI
Camaraderie & Careers: The Women’s Dinners Since 1994, the MD-PhD program has sponsored an annual
women’s dinner to help strengthen connections between the
junior and senior women. In previous years, the dinner has
also provided students with the opportunity to talk openly
about women’s issues among each other and with women
faculty and to learn from others’ experiences. Finally, after
a two year hiatus, the women’s dinner came back as a won-
derful success, due to the efforts of Linda Burnley and the
generous offer of Judy Lieberman,
Professor of Pediatrics, to open her
home in Brookline to the program.
On the evening of January 23, over
40 women students and faculty gath-
ered to enjoy excellent food and
company. The older students on the
wards and dispersed in labs had the
opportunity to catch up with each
other, as well as bounce research ideas off
faculty and fellow students. The new students had the
opportunity to spend time together outside of class, as well
as solicit advice from both older students and faculty. Topics
discussed, including many recurring key themes, ranged
from what to look for in a thesis lab to how to balance chil-
dren and family with a career, and the evening was a pleas-
ant balance of catching up, camaraderie and personal and
career advising. Thank you again to Judy Lieberman for
hosting such a wonderful event! — by Milena Andzelm
Above, left to right: Chinfei Chen, Rebecca Spencer, Judy Lieberman, Lilit Garibyan,
Linda Burnley, Hanna Chang, Marlys Fassett, Onyi Iweala, and Roya Khosravi-Far.
Below: Dr. Judy Lieberman and Lilit Garibyan.
HARVARD MD-PHD PROGRAM n e w s l e t t e r
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A Brief Report on the 24th Annual Retreat
After another year spent in MD or PhD courses, in the lab and on the wards, it was great to get together last fall, October 13-15,
2006, with our MD-PhD classmates, faculty and program administrators and relax. We began the weekend with our lovely fleece
vests and dinner in the dining room. It’s really amazing how many desserts there are to choose from! Our evening of talks from both
senior and junior students included subjects from immunology to metabolomics. That evening, people found many ways to enter-
tain themselves, as always. The next morning we all grabbed a quick breakfast (or slept through it!) and then enjoyed a morning of
senior student presentations, from biochemistry to infectious disease.
Dr. Judah Folkman, the Julia Dyckman Andrus Professor of Pediatric Surgery, gave an inspiring talk [the Eva Neer Memorial
Lecture: “Angiogenesis: An Organizing Principle in Biology and Medicine?”], taking us all through his career and demonstrating the
unanticipated outcomes of clinical work and basic bench investigation. His career makes it clear that it is possible to merge clinical
and research interests into a seamless, fulfilling path—which is a great thing to remind us on our long path to our combined degrees.
After our outdoor group picture and a quick lunch, we headed out for hikes, hot tub soaks and shopping and chats. Most of us even
made it back for the poster session.
It’s great to actually get a sense of what our friends spend all their time in lab working on. Our lobster bake was a nice break and
was followed by an after dinner game of medical trivia hosted by Athar Malik. The traditional dance was held later…to protect the
participants, I’ll say no more! The next morning our faculty panel on career transitions was a great introduction to key decision
points to look out for, and we all headed back to Boston with a new sense of purpose and great memories. We are looking forward to
the next retreat in 2007 to celebrate the retreat’s 25th anniversary. — by Sarah Henrickson
Gallery
HARVARD MD-PHD PROGRAM n e w s l e t t e r
notes Annual Q&A Session Shown at right are Drs. Maria
Rupnick, associate program direc-
Longitudinal Course in Clinical
Medicine that starts on April 9
and runs for seven weeks held
at the Brigham and Women’s
Hospital. A major goal of the course is to refresh the clinical
skills of students who are beginning their transition back
to full-time clinical clerkships. Shown at the right are Dan
Seeberg, Adam Friedman, Zuzana Tothova who attended
the meeting.
Rhee and Milan Bajmoczi
9 HARVARD MD-PHD PROGRAM n e w s l e t t e r
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Publications (as of July 2006)
Pau AK, McLaughlin MM, Hu Z, Agyemang AF, Polis MA, Kottilil S. Predictors for Hematopoietic Growth Factors Use in HIV/HCV-Coinfected Patients Treated with Peginterferon Alfa 2b and Ribavirin. AIDS Patient Care STDS. 2006 Sep;20(9):612-9.
Radoshitzky SR, Abraham J, Spiropoulou CF, Kuhn JH, Nguyen D, Li W, Nagel J, Schmidt PJ, Nunberg JH, Andrews NC, Farzan M, Choe H. Transferrin receptor 1 is a cellular receptor for New World haemorrhagic fever arenaviruses. Nature. 2007 Feb 7; [Epub ahead of print]
Lara D, Abuabara K, Grossman D, Diaz-Olavarrieta C. Pharmacy provision of medical abortifacients in a Latin American city. Contraception. 2006 Nov;74(5):394-9. Epub 2006 Jul 17.
Westley E, Bigrigg A, Webb A, Haskell S, Blanchard K, Loftus-Granberg B, Sorhaindo A, Johnston K, Spiers A, Abuabara K, Ellertson C. Risk of pregnancy and external validity in clinical trials of emergency contraception. J Fam Plann Reprod Health Care. 2006 Jul;32(3):165-9.
Bardeesy N, Aguirre AJ, Chu GC, Cheng KH, Lopez LV, Hezel AF, Feng B, Brennan C, Weissleder R, Mahmood U, Hanahan D, Redston MS, Chin L, Depinho RA. Both p16(Ink4a) and the p19(Arf)-p53 pathway constrain progression of pancreatic adenocar- cinoma in the mouse. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Apr 11;103(15):5947-52. Epub 2006 Apr 3.
Yang L, Kowalski JR, Yacono P, Bajmoczi M, Shaw SK, Froio RM, Golan DE, Thomas SM, Luscinskas FW. Endothelial cell cortactin coordinates intercellular adhesion molecule-1 clustering and actin cytoskeleton remodeling during polymorphonuclear leukocyte adhe- sion and transmigration. J Immunol. 2006 Nov 1;177(9):6440-9.
Bernstein-Hanley I, Coers J, Balsara ZR, Taylor GA, Starnbach MN, Dietrich WF. The p47 GTPases Igtp and Irgb10 map to the Chlamydia trachomatis susceptibility locus Ctrq-3 and mediate cellular resistance in mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Sep 19;103(38):14092-7. Epub 2006 Sep 7.
Balsara ZR, Misaghi S, Lafave JN, Starnbach MN. Chlamydia trachomatis infection induces cleavage of the mitotic cyclin B1. Infect Immun. 2006 Oct;74(10):5602-8.
Bolar DS, Levin DL, Hopkins SR, Frank LF, Liu TT, Wong EC, Buxton RB. Quantification of regional pulmonary blood flow using ASL-FAIRER. Magn Reson Med. 2006 Jun;55(6):1308-17.
Zhang WT, Mainero C, Kumar A, Wiggins CJ, Benner T, Purdon PL, Bolar DS, Kwong KK, Sorensen AG. Strategies for improving the detection of fMRI activation in trigeminal pathways with cardiac gating. Neuroimage. 2006 Jul 15;31(4):1506-12. Epub 2006 Apr 19.
Chen IA. GE Prize-winning essay. The emergence of cells during the origin of life. Science. 2006 Dec 8;314(5805):1558-9.
Pe’er I, Chretien YR, de Bakker PI, Barrett JC, Daly MJ, Altshuler DM. Biases and reconcili- ation in estimates of linkage disequilibrium in the human genome. Am J Hum Genet. 2006 Apr;78(4):588-603. Epub 2006 Mar 1.
Zhou Z, Hong EJ, Cohen S, Zhao WN, Ho HY, Schmidt L, Chen WG, Lin Y, Savner E, Griffith EC, Hu L, Steen JA, Weitz CJ, Greenberg ME. Brain-specific phosphorylation of MeCP2 regulates activity-dependent Bdnf transcription, dendritic growth, and spine mat- uration. Neuron. 2006 Oct 19;52(2):255-69.
Artavanis-Tsakonas K, Misaghi S, Comeaux CA, Catic A, Spooner E, Duraisingh MT, Ploegh HL. Identification by functional proteomics of a deubiquitinating/deNeddylating enzyme in Plasmodium falciparum. Mol Microbiol. 2006 Sep;61(5):1187-95.
Dandapani SV, Sugimoto H, Matthews BD, Kolb RJ, Sinha S, Gerszten RE, Zhou J, Ingber DE, Kalluri R, Pollak MR. {alpha}-Actinin-4 Is Required for Normal Podocyte Adhesion. J Biol Chem. 2007 Jan 5;282(1):467-77. Epub 2006 Nov 2.
Dandapani SV, Pollak MR. The glomerular filter: Biologic and genetic complexity. Kidney Int. 2006 Sep;70(6):980-2.
Dekker JP, Yellen G. Cooperative Gating between Single HCN Pacemaker Channels. J Gen Physiol. 2006 Nov;128(5):561-7. Epub 2006 Oct 16.
Dhand, A. The roles performed by peer educators during outreach among heroin addicts in India: Ethnographic insights. Soc Sci Med. 2006 Nov;63(10):2674-85. Epub 2006 Aug 14.
Friedman A, Perrimon N. High-throughput approaches to dissecting MAPK signaling pathways. Methods. 2006 Nov;40(3):262-71.
Kulkarni MM, Booker M, Silver SJ, Friedman A, Hong P, Perrimon N, Mathey-Prevot B. Evidence of off-target effects associated with long dsRNAs in Drosophila melanogaster cell-based assays. Nat Methods. 2006 Oct;3(10):833-8.
Friedman A, Perrimon N. A functional RNAi screen for regulators of receptor tyrosine kinase and ERK signalling. Nature. 2006 Nov 9;444(7116):230-4. Epub 2006 Nov 1.
10 HARVARD MD-PHD PROGRAM n e w s l e t t e r
C on
gra tu
la tio
ns ! PhDs Completed
We congratulate the following students who completed their PhDs during the last semester.
Amar Dhand, Holmes, Educational Studies at
Oxford University [Geoffrey Walford, Ph.D.]
Peer learning among a group of heroin
addicts in India: An ethnographic study
(12/06).
Robert Horvitz, Ph.D.] The Regulation of
Programmed and Pathological Cell Death
in C. elegans (9/06).
M.D., Ph.D.] Transcriptional Regulation
(11/06).
Developmental Biology (DMS) at Harvard
University. [Daniel J. Finley, Ph.D.] Func-
tional Analysis of Ubp6, a Proteasome-
Associated Deubiquitinating Enzyme (8/06).
[Eric Lander, Ph.D.] Reactive oxygen species
play a causal role in multiple forms of insulin
resistance (11/06).
at Harvard University. [Stephen C. Blacklow,
M.D., Ph.D.] Folding and Maturation of
Lipoprotein Receptors (10/06).
[Sanjoy K. Mitter, Ph.D. and Emery N.
Brown, M.D., Ph.D.] From Thought to
Action (7/06).
Tannenbaum, Ph.D.] Mechanical injury
integrity and tissue homeostatis: A mass
spectrometric analysis of proteins with
relevance to arthritis (7/06).
Leo L. Tsai, HST, Biophysics (GSAS) at Harvard University. [Ronald L. Walsworth, Jr., Ph.D.]
Development of a Low-Field 3He MRI System to Study Posture-Dependence of Pulmonary
Function (7/06).
Ellen Yeh, HST, Biophysics (GSAS) at Harvard University. [Christopher T. Walsh, Ph.D.]
Enzymatic halogenation during natural product biosynthesis (7/06).
Shown above are (top) Professor Dan
Finley and John Hanna; Sahar Nissim
cheers for the "D-Fence"; Sagar Koduri
and Professor Steve Blacklow.
I
THIS NEWSLETTER IS SUPPORTED IN PART BY THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF
HEALTH MEDICAL SCIENTIST TRAINING PROGRAM GRANT T32-GM07753-27.
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Berger MF, Philippakis AA, Qureshi AM, He FS, Estep PW 3rd, Bulyk ML. Compact, universal DNA microarrays to comprehensively determine transcription-factor binding site specificities. Nat Biotechnol. 2006 Nov;24(11):1429-1435. Epub 2006 Sep 24.
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Nolan EM, Ryu JW, Jaworski J, Feazell RP, Sheng M, Lippard SJ. Zinspy Sensors with Enhanced Dynamic Range for Imaging Neuronal Cell Zinc Uptake and Mobilization. J Am Chem Soc. 2006 Dec 6;128(48):15517-15528.
Safo PK, Cravatt BF, Regehr WG. Retrograde endocannabinoid signaling in the cerebellar cortex. Cerebellum. 2006;5(2):134-45. Review.
Turner DJ, Shendure J, Porreca G, Church G, Green P, Tyler-Smith C, Hurles ME. Assaying chro- mosomal inversions by single-molecule haplotyping. Nat Methods. 2006 Jun;3(6):439-45.
Wachterman MW, Sommers BD. The Impact of Gender and Marital Status on End-of-Life Care: Evidence from the National Mortality Follow-Back Survey. J Palliat Med. 2006 Apr;9(2):343-52.
Sommers BD. Protecting Low-Income Children’s Access to Care: Are Physician Visits Associated with Reduced Patient Drop-Out from Medicaid and CHIP?” Pediatrics. 2006 Jul;118(1):e36-42.
Sommers BD. Insuring children or insuring families: do parental and sibling coverage lead to improved retention of children in Medicaid and CHIP? J Health Econ. 2006 Nov;25(6):1154-69. Epub 2006 Jun 5.
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Song YA, Hsu S, Stevens AL, Han J. Continuous-flow pI-based sorting of proteins and peptides in a microfluidic chip using diffusion potential. Anal Chem. 2006 Jun 1;78(11):3528-36.
Stover EH, Chen J, Folens C, Lee BH, Mentens N, Marynen P, Williams IR, Gilliland DG, Cools J.Activation of FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha requires disruption of the juxtamembrane domain of PDGFRalpha and is FIP1L1-independent. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 May 23;103(21):8078- 83. Epub 2006 May 11.
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Taniguchi CM, Tran TT, Kondo T, Luo J, Ueki K, Cantley LC, Kahn CR. Phosphoinositide 3- kinase regulatory subunit p85alpha suppresses insulin action via positive regulation of PTEN. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Aug 8;103(32):12093-7. Epub 2006 Jul 31.
Tothova Z, Kollipara R, Huntly BJ, Lee BH, Castrillon DH, Cullen DE, McDowell EP, Lazo- Kallanian S, Williams IR, Sears C, Armstrong SA, Passegue E, Depinho RA, Gilliland DG. FoxOs Are Critical Mediators of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Resistance to Physiologic Oxidative Stress. Cell. 2007 Jan 26;128(2):325-339.
Paik JH, Kollipara R, Chu G, Ji H, Xiao Y, Ding Z, Miao L, Tothova Z, Horner JW, Carrasco DR, Jiang S, Gilliland DG, Chin L, Wong WH, Castrillon DH, Depinho RA. FoxOs Are Lineage- Restricted Redundant Tumor Suppressors and Regulate Endothelial Cell Homeostasis. Cell. 2007 Jan 26;128(2):309-23.
Klein M, Tsai LL, Rosen MS, Pavlin T, Candela D, Walsworth RL. Interstitial gas and density segregation of vertically vibrated granular media. Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys. 2006 Jul;74(1 Pt 1):010301. Epub 2006 Jul 18.
Becker-Catania SG, Gregory TL, Yang Y, Gau CL, de Vellis J, Cederbaum SD, Iyer RK. Loss of arginase I results in increased proliferation of neural stem cells. J Neurosci Res. 2006 Sep; 84(4):735-46.
Kelly WL, Ii MT, Yeh E, Vosburg DA, Galoni Cacute DP, Kelleher NL, Walsh CT. Characterization of the Aminocarboxycyclopropane-Forming Enzyme CmaC. Biochemistry. 2007 Jan 16;46(2): 359-368.
Vaillancourt FH, Yeh E, Vosburg DA, Garneau-Tsodikova S, Walsh CT. Nature’s inventory of halogenation catalysts: oxidative strategies predominate. Chem Rev. 2006 Aug;106(8):3364-78.
Yeh E, Cole LJ, Barr EW, Bollinger JM Jr, Ballou DP, Walsh CT. Flavin redox chemistry precedes substrate chlorination during the reaction of the flavin-dependent halogenase RebH. Biochemistry. 2006 Jun 27;45(25):7904-12.
Kaneko S, Wang J, Kaneko M, Yiu G, Hurrell JM, Chitnis T, Khoury SJ, He Z. Protecting axonal degeneration by increasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels in experimental autoim- mune encephalomyelitis models. J Neurosci. 2006 Sep 20;26(38):9794-804.
Yiu G, He Z. Glial inhibition of CNS axon regeneration. Nat Rev Neurosci. 2006 Aug; 7(8):617-27. Review.
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Chen Q, Fisher DT, Clancy KA, Gauguet JM, Wang WC, Unger E, Rose-John S, von Andrian UH, Baumann H, Evans SS. Fever-range thermal stress promotes lymphocyte trafficking across high endothelial venules via an interleukin 6 trans-signaling mechanism. Nat Immunol. 2006 Nov 5;7(12):1299-1308 [Epub ahead of print].
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HARVARD MD-PHD PROGRAM n e w s l e t t e r 11
TOSTESON MEDICAL EDUCATION CENTER
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02115-5720
TEL 617-432-0991
FAX 617-432-2791
H A R V A R D M E D I C A L S C H O O L
MD-PhD PROGRAM n e w s l e t t e r
Incoming MD-PhD Students, 2006-2007 Jonathan Abraham of Rosedale, NY, received his AB degree Cum Laude in Biochemical Sciences from Harvard University in June, 2006.
Milena M. Andzelm of San Diego, CA, graduated from Harvard University in 2006 with AB degree Summa Cum Laude in Biochemical Sciences.
Erin (Yiyin) Chen of Greer, SC, graduated from the University of Chicago in June 2006 with BA degree with General Honors; Biological Sciences with Honors.
Sarah J. Hill of Bismarck, ND graduated from Harvard University in June 2005 with AB degree Magna Cum Laude Highest Honors in Biochemical Sciences and as Rhodes Scholar received her MSc degree from Oxford University in 2006.
Stephen J. Huffaker of Crawfordsville, IN graduated from University of Wisconsin in 2002 with a BS in Natural Sciences with Honors (highest distinction) and then received his PhD in Neuroscience from Cambridge University, UK and NIMH, US in 2006.
Mark N. Lee from North Wales, PA graduated from Yale in 2004 with a BS and MS degrees Summa Cum Laude in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry.
Karolina Maciag, born in Poland and moved to Sterling,
VA at the age of 5, graduated from Harvard University in 2004 with AB degree Magna Cum Laude in Biochemical Sciences.
Devarati Mitra of Rockville, MD received her BS degree with High Honors from Stanford University in 2006 in Biological Sciences.
Yin Ren, born in China and moved to Canada at age of 15, was awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, Minor in Biomedical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in June 2006.
Cameron Sadegh of Franklin Lakes, NJ graduated in 2006 with a BS degree in Biology, minor in Biomedical Engineering and BS in Chemical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Amy B. Saltzman of Gates Mills, OH, received her AB degree with Highest Honors in Anthropology in May 2005 from Princeton University. She joined the new social sciences track.
Jenny (Yawei) Yang from San Diego, CA, received her BS Degree, Summa Cum Laude, and MA degree in Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2006.
For the Record
v i s i t o u r w e b s i t e a t w w w. h m s . h a r v a rd . e d u / m d _ p h d
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Save the Date Note these upcoming program events
C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 1
LCCM Course April 9
MD-PhD Revisit April 12-14
HMS Commencement June 7
MIT Commencement June 8
Summer BBQ July 11
Poster Symposium August 2

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