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Leading Practice Presentation

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  • LEADING PRACTICE

    IN LIFE WITHOUT

    BARRIERSImplementing Our Practice Framework and Building A Culture Of Learning and Reflection

    Not for Profit People Conference November 2016 Mary McKinnon

  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY

    2

    We would like to begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land were meeting on today, and acknowledge our gratitude that we share this land today, our sorrow for some of the costs of that sharing, and our hope and belief that we can move to a place of equity, justice, and partnership together.

  • WHO WE ARE

    3

  • Life Without Barriers is a not for profit organisation committed to providing

    community-based programs to assist children, young people, adults, older people

    and families to live the best life possible. We are a values-based organisation

    committed to achieve positive outcomes for all clients.

    WHO WE

    ARE

    4

  • OUR PURPOSE - TO PARTNER WITH PEOPLE TO CHANGE LIVES FOR THE BETTERWHO WE

    ARE

    5

    300+ communities across Australia

    4,000+ staff

    Supported by 2,500+ volunteers

    Work with 15,000+ individuals each year

    Social-purpose organisation

    Values-based

  • 6

  • WHAT IS

    LEADING

    PRACTICE?

    7

  • LWB

    PILLARS

    OF

    PRACTICE

    8

  • OUR

    LEADING

    PRACTICE

    GOALS

    9

    Build leadership

    skills at the frontline, in

    relationship with staff and clients

    Strengthen quality

    supervision

    Improve client outcomes

    Strengthen relationship

    based practice

    A culture of learning and continuous

    improvement

    Improve staff retention

  • WHY FOCUS

    ON

    FRONTLINE

    LEADERS?

    10

    There are over 400 frontline leaders across Life Without Barriers

    These leaders work with teams to support clients in a variety of

    service types and settings including family support and out of

    home care; disability services, mental health, youth justice,

    support for refugees and asylum seekers home and community

    care

    Teams work in metropolitan, regional, rural and remote locations

    across Australia

    Frontline supervisors influence virtually everything

    we do. They affect how policies are followed and

    what practices are encouraged.

    They set the tone and expectations in the workplace to

    the extent that they are our keepers of culture.(Family and Childrens Resource Program, North Carolina, 2008)

  • The challenge of implementing practice and culture

    change through professional development.WHAT ARE

    WE

    DOING?

    11

    A national progressive rollout Perth, Northern NSW, Victoria and beyond

    Training is great but. It should be experiential and allow for skills practice

    Recognition that learning is an ongoing process (not an event)

    Integrated with existing workplace functions especially supervision and group based activities

    Coaching for success

    Practice, practice, practice

    Fixsen et al (2005), Gray and Gibbons (2002), McArthur and Thomson (2014), University of California Training Academy (2013).

  • 12

    WHAT DOES LEADING PRACTICE LOOK LIKE?HOW ARE

    WE DOING

    IT? Relationships, reflection and learning

    Experiential learning, dispersed leadership

    ideas and multi functional supervision

    Strong role for frontline leaders in governance

    and implementation

    Workshops co facilitated internally by LWB

    leaders

    External expertise to provide individual

    coaching

    Local implementation supported nationally

    Integrated with our national supervision policy

    guideline

  • Uses processes, techniques and information that

    mirror supervision and

    leadership

    Builds on participants experiences,

    existing knowledge and skills.

    Facilitator, not trainer/teacher/

    expert

    Not topic driven -primarily

    discussion-based

    Model processes, techniques and

    skills

    Guide discussion about participants

    experience

    Scenarios, activities and practice tools

    WORKSHOP

    APPROACH

    13

  • A bridge from the workshop to the workplace

    Combination of information only and action oriented resources

    Covers topics such as:Organisation and social contextPractical guides for reflective practiceRelationship based practiceEmotions and leadershipSupervision skills and techniquesBeginning, continuing and ending supervisory relationships

    New tools being progressively introduced

    Scenarios, videos, journal articles - internally and externally produced

    Available in hard copy, digitally on USB and onthe LWB intranet

    RESOURCES

    AND TOOLS

    14

  • The learning cycle in introduced in the workshop - participants are encouraged to spend more time in reflection and analysis in order to learn.

    Practice leaders have access to up to six coaching session

    Coaching participation is voluntary but strongly encouraged and supported.

    COACHING

    APPROACH

    15

    Experience what

    happened?

    Reflection what was

    it like?

    Analysing/ theorising why and what does it mean?

    Action/ planning what next?

    A unique opportunity for a frontline leader to set and be supported to work towards learning goals

    Uses the reflective learning cycle combined with the RE-GROW approach.

  • Coaching is a collaborative, solution focussed, and strengths

    based process between coach and coachee, focussing on

    enhancing practice and ultimately client outcomes.

    Successful coaching requires:

    Coach and coachee willingness to develop a relationship

    Time limited, goal focused approach

    Direct, sensitive and often challenging conversations

    Clear understanding of roles;

    Coach plays the role of facilitator of change

    Coachees responsibility to enact change

    An understanding that either the coach or coachee may elect to

    terminate the coaching arrangement at any time

    COACHING

    - THE

    BASICS

    16

  • CIRCLES

    OF

    CONCERN

    INFLUENCE

    & CONTROL

    17

  • EVALUATION

    18

  • WHAT

    FRONTLINE

    LEADERS

    TELL US

    19

    Hear what Tham and Raewyn have to say about

    Leading Practice at https://youtu.be/Ufxs3z4JLLM

    Tham FuyanaCase Manager

    Children and Family

    Raewyn LaingCommunity Support

    Worker

    https://youtu.be/Ufxs3z4JLLM

  • Planning and Implementation Support by senior staff is essential Enthusiastic, motived and supported local people make a real difference in implementation

    success and impact on culture Local focus on embedding learning after workshops and coaching can support real change

    Workshops Facilitators need time together and support to prepare for workshops

    Early adopters on first workshops in each location

    The workshop approach is different than many peoples experience of training so participants need to know what to expect before attending

    Where possible ensure a mix of skills, experience and support areas in each workshop

    Coaching Procurement of local external coaches can be challenging and take up to three months

    It takes time to explain and understand the coaching process and benefits

    Coaches should attend a workshop lunch session to familiarise

    Coaching can be individual or small group

    Coaching uptake takes time to build - word of mouth is helpful, as is support from managers and peers

    20

    WHAT WE

    ARE

    LEARNING

  • 21

    Inputs

    Internal and external expertise

    Resources

    Org structure

    Activities

    Workshops

    Practice tools

    Coaching

    Participation

    Frontline leaders

    Facilitators / Local and

    national teams

    Outcomes

    Leadership

    Supervision

    Teamwork

    A learning culture that improves

    leadership and practice quality at the

    frontline

    DEVELOPING A PROGRAM LOGIC HELPED US IDENTIFY THE SHORT,

    MEDIUM AND LONG TERM OUTCOMES TO MEASURE

  • 22

    MEASURING THE SHORT TERM OUTCOMES USING A

    SURVEY APPROACHEVALUATION

    INITIAL

    FINDINGS

  • About the workshopFor the first time since becoming an acting Care Coordinator I actually feel like a leader

    and I can do good things for my clients and staff.

    About the resources and toolsI use the Circles of Control a fair bit in my assessments and with staff during

    consultations. I also use the leadership paradigm to remind staff when they have taken

    a leadership role and successfully reached a positive outcome. I use the reflective cycle

    when debriefing staff and the sources of power tool

    About coachingI have used the coaching that I received via the Leading Practice which has given me

    ideas to try in Team Meetings. These ideas/activities proved to be a success

    WHAT

    FRONTLINE

    LEADERS

    TELL US

    23

    I just want to thank LWB for the opportunity to participate in

    the leading practice training and coaching sessions. I will

    continuously refer to the program to improve my management

    skills and create a positive workplace culture

  • 24

    National rollout around Australia including in remote areas current locations are:

    Sydney and Southern NSW

    Hunter and Central Coast NSW

    Western NSW

    South Australia

    Reflect and learn as we implement and make changes

    Continue to develop and review practice resources and

    tools as the sector changes and grows

    Continue the evaluation to measure medium and long

    term outcomes and report on our findings

    NEXT

    STEPS

  • REFERENCES

    25

    Family and Childrens Resource Program (2008). Supervision and the Future of Child Welfare,

    Childrens services Practice Notes, 13 (2)

    Fixsen, D, Naoom, S, Blas, K, Friedman, R and Wallace, F (2005). Implementation Research: a

    synthesis of the literature, Louis de la Parte, Florida Mental Health Institute, Tampa.

    Grant, A (2011). Is it time to REGROW the GROW model? Issues related to teaching coaching

    session structures. The Coaching Psychologist, Volume 7, Number 2.

    Gray, M., & Gibbons, J. (2002). Experience based learning and its relevance to social work

    practice. Australian Social Work, 55(4), 279-291.

    Life Without Barriers (2015). Pillars of Practice Framework, Available at lwb.org.au.

    McArthur, M and Thomson, B (2014). Getting more bang for your buck: what works best in

    professional development in the child, youth and family workforce, Developing Practice, 39

    (July).

    University of California Training Academy (2013). The Coaching Toolkit for child welfare practice,

    in partnership with Case Family Programs, University of California, Davis.

  • THANK YOU

    &

    QUESTIONS

    26

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LEADING PRACTICE IN LIFE WITHOUT BARRIERS Implementing Our Practice Framework and Building A Culture Of Learning and Reflection Not for Profit People Conference November 2016 Mary McKinnon
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