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I Saw It In ... The Nashville Thursday June 2, 2011 Issue 44 1 Section • 14 Pages • In Howard County, Arkansas since 1878 USPS 371-540 • 75 cents • www.nashvillenews.org NEWS Charles Goodin Managing Editor J anice McRae remembers it like it was yesterday. In the early morning hours of Fri., June 11, 2010, the Montgomery County native left her home near Low- ery’s Camp Albert Pike and became one of the first to discover the disas- trous damage that had been done by a historic flash flood at Albert Pike Recreational Area. “I went over to the Forest Service park and at that time I realized there were flood victims,” she recalled during a recent interview. Shortly thereafter, the first light of sunrise peaked over the top of the nearby Ouachita Mountain foothills, in- spiring McRae to document the events in a poem entitled “Angel of First Light.” This year, McRae’s ballad will be set in stone - literally - as part of a memorial to the victims of the deadly flood set to be unveiled Sat., June 11, on the “east beach” area of the park. Opposite the poem, an angel will stare down on the names of 20 people who lost their lives in the tragic deluge. Debate about the future of the camp- ing area has raged since the day the disaster occurred, but the monument’s dedication represents more than a simple gesture of goodwill for McRae, whose friends and business associates were among those killed by the rising waters. “Some of the people who perished that day were personal friends of mine,” she said. “I’ve asked everyone to please not get into the politics of it and just pay our respects.” Monument will feature local woman’s poem Albert Pike memorial dedication is this month See MEMORIAL on Page 6 FLYING LIKE AN EAGLE Benson Checketts, pictured with his mother Martha and father McKay, was awarded the rank of Eagle Scout Tues., May 31, at the Min- eral Springs High School Cafeteria. Checketts is a member of Troop 7 in Lovell, Wyo. The Court of Honor ceremony was done via the internet with 30 friends and neighbors in attendance at Mineral Springs. Troop 61 of Nashville was also on hand. They helped Checketts with his leadership project, which was designing new landscaping for the front of the Mineral Springs High School. Photo by Cecil Harris UMPIRE - The Gregg and Shelly Greene fam- ily of the Athens Com- munity has been chosen Howard County’s Farm Family of the Year for 2011, representatives of Howard County Farm Bu- reau and the Mine Creek Conservation District, and the Natural Resourc- es Conservation Service have announced. The organizations are chief sponsors of the program in Howard County. Gregg and Shelly raise Broilers, Hogs and Cattle on 210 acres that they own and another 100 acres that they lease. They have been involved in farming for 34 years. Shelly works off farm as a teacher to supplement the family income. As the Howard County Farm Family of the Year, the Greene’s family will join 74 other county farm families in vying for district and state recog- nition as the Arkansas Farm Family of the Year. The Arkansas Farm Fam- ily of the Year will be announced December at a banquet at the Wynd- ham Riverfront in North Little Rock. First established in 1947, Arkansas’ Farm Family of the Year pro- gram is the longest run- ning effort of its kind in the nation. The program sponsors are Arkansas Farm Bureau, Arkan- sas Press Association, Farm Credit Services of Western Arkansas, Farm Credit Midsouth, ACA, AgHeritage Farm Credit Services and the Electric Cooperatives of Arkansas, with the coop- eration of the University of Arkansas Coopera- tive Extension Service, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Ser- vice Agency, USDA Rural Development, the USDA Terrica Hendrix Editor NASHVILLE – With today’s economy, it’s nice to receive extra money, just as long as it’s from a reliable source. Sheriff Butch Morris is warning resi- dents that they may receive a check in the mail from PNC Bank regarding a “Customer’s Appreciation Draw.” Morris said the check is a scam. A local woman received a check and the “award claim final notifica- tion” attached with the check. The notification stated, ”This is to inform you of the official release of the 2011 Customer’s Appreciation Lotiery [sic] Draw, organized for all customers of major stores in USA, Canada, Mexico, Spain and United Kingdom namely: Best Buy, Wal-Mart, Sears, Lowes, Home Depot, Staples, Ikea,” and other busi- nesses – including major credit cards companies. The letter will try to trick “winners” by saying they’ve “many unsuccessful attempts to contact you regarding this winning. You are entitled to the sum of $120,000 US dollars. This is from total prize money of $2,400,000 US dollars that was shared and presented among 20 declared winners. Please note that all the participants were selected through a random computer ballot system drawn from over 50,000 names,” the notification continued. The notification offers a way to “ex- Sheriff warns of new check scam See SCAM on Page 6 Sheriff Butch Morris is warning local resi- dents to watch out for scam checks like this one. Greenes selected ‘Farm Family of the Year’ See FARM on Page 6 ONE CLASS AT A TIME Channel 3 News KTBS of Shreveport and Texarkana surprised Nashville High School english teacher Lisa Wesson with a $1,000 check as part of its “One Class at a Time” program. Wesson submitted a form in January that explained the use of the Amazon Kindle e-readers in Nashville High School classrooms. The $1,000 dollar check will go towards the purchasing of new fiction and non-fiction literacy for the Kindle tablets in the next school year. KTBS will air the presentation sometime later this month. Photo by Logan Webster
Transcript

I Saw It In ...

TheNashville

ThursdayJune 2, 2011

Issue 44 1 Section • 14 Pages • In Howard County, Arkansas since 1878USPS 371-540 • 75 cents • www.nashvillenews.org

NEWS

Charles Goodin

Managing Editor

Janice McRae remembers it like it was yesterday.

In the early morning hours of Fri., June 11, 2010, the Montgomery County native left her home near Low-ery’s Camp Albert Pike and became one of the fi rst to discover the disas-trous damage that had been done by a historic flash flood at Albert Pike Recreational Area.

“I went over to the Forest Service park and at that time I realized there were fl ood victims,” she recalled during a recent interview.

Shortly thereafter, the fi rst light of sunrise peaked over the top of the nearby Ouachita Mountain foothills, in-spiring McRae to document the events in a poem entitled “Angel of First Light.”

This year, McRae’s ballad will be set in stone - literally - as part of a memorial to the victims of the deadly fl ood set to be unveiled Sat., June 11, on the “east beach” area of the park. Opposite the poem, an angel will stare down on the names of 20 people who lost their lives in the tragic deluge.

Debate about the future of the camp-ing area has raged since the day the disaster occurred, but the monument’s dedication represents more than a simple gesture of goodwill for McRae, whose friends and business associates were among those killed by the rising waters.

“Some of the people who perished that day were personal friends of mine,” she said. “I’ve asked everyone to please not get into the politics of it and just pay our respects.”

Monument will feature local woman’s poemAlbert Pike memorial dedication is this month

See MEMORIAL on Page 6

FLYING LIKE AN EAGLE

Benson Checketts, pictured with his mother Martha and father McKay, was awarded the rank of Eagle Scout Tues., May 31, at the Min-eral Springs High School Cafeteria. Checketts is a member of Troop 7 in Lovell, Wyo. The Court of Honor ceremony was done via the internet with 30 friends and neighbors in attendance at Mineral Springs. Troop 61 of Nashville was also on hand. They helped Checketts with his leadership project, which was designing new landscaping for the front of the Mineral Springs High School.

Photo by Cecil Harris

UMPIRE - The Gregg and Shelly Greene fam-ily of the Athens Com-munity has been chosen Howard County’s Farm Family of the Year for 2011, representatives of Howard County Farm Bu-reau and the Mine Creek Conservation District, and the Natural Resourc-es Conservation Service have announced. The organizations are chief sponsors of the program in Howard County.

Gregg and Shelly raise Broilers, Hogs and Cattle on 210 acres that they own and another 100 acres that they lease. They have been involved in farming for 34 years. Shelly works off farm as a teacher to supplement the family income.

As the Howard County Farm Family of the Year, the Greene’s family will join 74 other county farm families in vying for district and state recog-

nition as the Arkansas Farm Family of the Year. The Arkansas Farm Fam-ily of the Year will be announced December at a banquet at the Wynd-ham Riverfront in North Little Rock.

First established in 1947, Arkansas’ Farm Family of the Year pro-gram is the longest run-ning effort of its kind in the nation. The program sponsors are Arkansas Farm Bureau, Arkan-sas Press Association, Farm Credit Services of Western Arkansas, Farm Credit Midsouth, ACA, AgHeritage Farm Credit Services and the Electric Cooperatives of Arkansas, with the coop-eration of the University of Arkansas Coopera-tive Extension Service, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Ser-vice Agency, USDA Rural Development, the USDA

Terrica Hendrix

Editor

NASHVILLE – With today’s economy, it’s nice to receive extra money, just as long as it’s from a reliable source.

Sheriff Butch Morris is warning resi-dents that they may receive a check in the mail from PNC Bank regarding a “Customer’s Appreciation Draw.”

Morris said the check is a scam.A local woman received a check

and the “award claim final notifica-tion” attached with the check. The notifi cation stated, ”This is to inform you of the offi cial release of the 2011

Customer’s Appreciation Lotiery [sic] Draw, organized for all customers of major stores in USA, Canada, Mexico, Spain and United Kingdom namely: Best Buy, Wal-Mart, Sears, Lowes, Home Depot, Staples, Ikea,” and other busi-nesses – including major credit cards companies.

The letter will try to trick “winners” by saying they’ve “many unsuccessful attempts to contact you regarding this winning. You are entitled to the sum of $120,000 US dollars. This is from total prize money of $2,400,000 US dollars that was shared and presented among

20 declared winners. Please note that all the participants were selected through a random computer ballot system drawn from over 50,000 names,” the notifi cation continued.

The notifi cation offers a way to “ex-

Sheriff warns of new check scam

See SCAM on Page 6

Sheriff Butch Morris is warning local resi-dents to watch out for scam checks like this one.

Greenes selected ‘Farm Family of the Year’

See FARM on Page 6

ONE CLASS AT A TIME

Channel 3 News KTBS of Shreveport and Texarkana surprised Nashville High School english teacher Lisa Wesson with a $1,000 check as part of its “One Class at a Time” program. Wesson submitted a form in January that explained the use of the Amazon Kindle e-readers in Nashville High School classrooms. The $1,000 dollar check will go towards the purchasing of new fiction and non-fiction literacy for the Kindle tablets in the next school year. KTBS will air the presentation sometime later this month.

Photo by Logan Webster

Page 2 • Thursday, June 2, 2011 • NASHVILLE NEWS

Twice the news is twice as nice.Stay informed at www.nashvillenews.org

Opinions

POSTMASTER, Send Change of Address to:

P.O. Box 297Nashville, AR 71852

Louis ‘Swampy’ Graves, Editor and Editor Emeritus, 1950-2001

Mike Graves, CEO/PublisherDonna Harwell, Comptroller/Office Mgr.Terrica Hendrix, EditorCharles Goodin, Managing EditorDewayne Holloway, Sports EditorDeanna Jarrett, Obit Editor/Composing Mgr.Morgan Jones, Advertising Manager Tamzen Jarrett Cox, Circulation-Advertising

The News is the oldest active business in Howard County -- Founded in 1878.

Find us on the Internet at: www.nashvillenews.org

NATIONAL

NEWSPAPER

ASSOCIATION

The Nashville News

USPS 371-540 P.O. Box 297 418 N. Main St. Nashville, AR 71852

Telephone (870) 845-2010Fax (870) 845-5091

Toll Free 1-888-845-NEWSEstablished 1878. Published since Sept. 1, 1979

by Graves Publishing Company, Inc.Lawrence Graves, President

Subscription rates:$30.00 per year in Howard, Pike, Sevier, Little River

and Hempstead counties;$50.00 elsewhere in continental United States

Periodicals Postage Paid at Nashville, Arkansas

Any erroneous statement published in the newspaper will be gladly and promptly corrected after management is notified.

The News is a twice weekly publication.

Governorof Arkansas

mikebeebe

One of the most fre-quent questions Arkan-sans ask The Arkansas Department of Environ-mental Quality Recycling Division is, “What should I do with my old paint cans?”

There is more than one correct answer to this question. And since now is the time many are doing home improvement proj-ects, ADEQ staff is offering several easy-to-do and inexpensive solutions.

“If paint goes into a landfi ll it needs to be a dry

consistency,” says ADEQ Recycling Director Rob-ert Hunter. “Wet paint, whether it be oil-based or latex, can contribute to leachate problems.” If leachate, which is liq-uid that has dissolved or carries environmentally harmful substances, is not properly managed it can contaminate ground water.

For an inexpensive so-lidifier, Hunter suggests pouring cat litter, sand or sawdust into the can and stirring it into the paint.

This will keep the paint in a solid form that can then be included in your regular trash. The can it-self can be recycled. And don’t worry about having the can spot free. Even if it has dried paint on the top or the sides, it can still be recycled. The impor-tant thing is to make sure all of the liquid has been disposed of properly.

Hunter says you can also pour the paint onto newspaper in a thin layer, let it dry in the sun, and then dispose with the rest of your household waste.

“The one thing we don’t want Arkansans doing is opening the lid and set-ting the can in the sun to dry. What will inevitably

happen is only the top few inches will dry. The paint underneath will still be in liquid form,” adds Hunter.

In addition to concerns about the landfi ll leachate, disposing of wet paint can also cause problems for your solid waste districts and even your neighbor-hood. Many waste col-lection companies use trucks with compactors. If those paint cans are crushed with wet paint still inside, it can create a mess for the truck, the roads, and even yours or your neighbor’s yard or driveway.

Arkansans may want to check with their solid waste districts before doing any kind of paint disposal. Some commu-

nities have household hazardous waste collec-tion centers that will take residential quantities of paints, solvents, house-hold chemicals and pes-ticides.

Another option is to check with local churches or organizations like Habi-tat for Humanity. Often times, they can use your old paint to re-furbish homes for others. The Habitat for Humanity in Pulaski County will accept all colors of paint as long as the can is at least ¾ full.

But when it comes to solid waste of any kind, the best solution can al-ways be found in the fi rst R of the 3 R’s: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. Reduc-ing paint waste can be

as simple as using a tape measure and a calculator. Nearly every home im-provement store now has a paint calculator. Most calculators are available online. Simply enter the dimensions of your proj-ect and the calculator can tell you exactly how much paint to purchase. As a rule of thumb, one gal-lon of paint will typically cover 350 square feet. Us-ing exact calculations will not only reduce waste, but could save you a lot of money.

You can find contact information for your lo-cal solid waste district on ADEQ’s website: http://www.adeq.state.ar.us/sol-waste/regional_boards_sql.asp

I voted against raising the nation’s debt ceiling today because we’ve got to send a strong mes-sage that it’s past time to stop the out-of-control spending in Washington. Before I can support any increase in the debt ceiling, it must include meaningful spending cuts that will actually reduce our defi cits without punishing America’s working families and seniors.

The debt ceiling isn’t about new spending; it’s about meeting the debts and obligations we’ve already committed. It has been increased 36 times over the last 30 years, with President Rea-gan signing 17 debt limit increases into law and President Obama signing three so far. The debt ceiling problem isn’t new, but it’s reached a level that is unsustainable. Congress needs to stop the partisan bickering and start working together to draft a commonsense compromise that preserves America’s standing in the global economy, cuts spending and reduces our defi cit.

Instead of playing games with the debt limit, we should instead focus on how to get our nation’s fi s-cal house back in order. That’s why I have worked hard as co-chair of the fi scally conservative Demo-cratic Blue Dog Coalition to pass components of our Blueprint for Fiscal Reform, cosponsoring 15 defi cit or debt reducing bills, many of which have become law. This Congress, I’ve also voted to cut $38 billion from the 2011 budget and am working hard to build support for the Blue Dog Benchmarks for Fiscal Reform, which aims to cut the defi cit by $4 trillion over the next decade. Reducing our defi -cit is and will continue to be my focus in Congress as a fi scal conservative and as a Representative from Arkansas.

From the Arkansas Department of

Environmental Quality

greenupdate

Problems with paint cans

Congressman

mike ross

Vote against debt ceiling increase sends a message

LITTLE ROCK - While technology continues to change our everyday lives, the State of Arkan-sas is also using it to keep our communities safer. The Arkansas Crime Information Center has recently launched a new online system that will help state officials and local law-enforcement protect our children, neighborhoods and com-munities.

Known by its acronym, CENSOR, this new system is a Centralized Electron-ic Network of Sex Offend-er Registries. It provides local law-enforcement offi cers and the Depart-ment of Corrections with the technology and tools to effi ciently register sex offenders. In short, it creates a sex-offender registration process that is faster and safer, and saves our taxpayers mon-ey. Along with notifying

the public sooner, the system also increases ac-countability for offenders, giving law-enforcement agencies more confi dence in tracking those offend-ers who are living in their communities.

We were able to de-velop the CENSOR sys-tem with a federal grant designed to assist local law-enforcement agencies with the processing and monitoring of sex offend-ers in their communities. It equips law-enforcement offi cers with an electronic signature pad and Web cameras to verify the identities of sex offend-ers and keep updated photos of them during subsequent visits.

Offenders are given their signed paperwork to take with them at their initial registration and subsequent verification visits. Offi cials can then electronically submit a

completed registration di-rectly to ACIC. The reduc-tion in paper forms and mailing costs is expected to save taxpayers $55,000 a year, while speeding up sex-offender assessment and public notifi cation.

The Department of Correction has been tak-ing additional steps to accelerate the assess-ment process. The Sex Offender Screening and Assessment Program has streamlined procedures and trained additional technical staff. Since last fall, these improvements have nearly doubled the number of assessments completed by the Depart-ment each month.

While the law protects the right to due process for all citizens, includ-ing sex offenders, the CENSOR system provides law enforcement and the public with the most cur-rent information, as soon as it is available. These recent advancements in our registration and tracking systems will im-

prove coordination and communication, allowing state agencies and local law enforcement to better inform and protect our citizens.

The ACIC provides a Sex Offender Registry Search for Arkansans who wish to access it. This information is updated regularly, and users can search for sex offenders by address or by name. The site also offers e-mail and phone notifi cations of updates of offender addresses.

ACIC has been able to achieve this remarkable improvement in managing our state’s sex-offender registry due in large part to its partnership with the Information Network of Arkansas (INA), whose primary objective is to provide technology and tools to make the jobs of law enforcement easier. I am very pleased with this system that will help keep our citizens more secure and hold offenders more accountable.

Protecting communities through technology 

NASHVILLE NEWS • Thursday, June 2, 2011 • Page 3

Obituary

Puzzle Answers

Mrs. Fenora Louise Watkins, age 56, died Sunday, May 29, 2011 in Foreman, Arkansas.

She was born March 8, 1955 in Sentinel, Okla-homa to Charlie Ellis and Gracie Patton Dorsey.

She is survived by one daughter, Samantha Wom-ack of Dugway, Utah; one brother, Randy Dorsey of Horatio; two sisters, Wanda Faye Edens of De Queen and Mary Ellen Hudson of Foreman; and her grandson, Logan Ellis Womack.

Graves ide funera l services for Mrs. Wat-kins were held at 10 a.m. Thursday, June 2, 2011 in the Clear Creek Cemetery with Ralph Staggs and Charles Ligon offi ciating.

You may register on-line at www.wilkersonfu-neralhomes.com.

Fenora WatkinsSherry Beaty

County Extension Agent

Agriculture

I love this time of year when all the berries start coming off. Strawberries, b l u e b e r r i e s , a n d blackberries…yummy! Here are few helpful hints to get more berries out of those plants that take so long to produce.

Stop bingeing birds with curtains. Are the birds getting more berries from your bushes than you are? To keep birds and other hungry animals out of your fruit vines and berry bushes, try this. Cover the vines and bushes with old, sheer curtains. The curtains will stop those eager nibblers with no harm done to creatures or plants.

Give blueberries new mulch for Christmas. You know your blueberries need mulching before January’s cold weather sets in, but you can’t possibly take the time to track down new mulch until after Christmas. Fortunately, the mulch you need might already be sitting in your family room. Once your holiday

celebrating ends, break down your live Christmas tree and use its branches for mulch. Evergreen mulches increase the soil’s acidity, and blueberry bushes insist on acidic soil. But you don’t have to wait for the Christmas season to arrive. Your blueberry bushes may appreciate evergreen mulch anytime they need protection from winter cold.

Treat blueberries with well-aged sawdust. What may look like old, rotting sawdust to you looks like a mouthwatering dessert to your blueberry plants. New sawdust just won’t cut it. To please your blueberries, sawdust needs to be old enough to rot a little. Give your blueberry bushes a mulch of well-aged sawdust and you may be surprised at what they can do. Just make sure you don’t use sawdust from chemically treated wood.

Mix blueberry varieties for better harvest. If you’re planting blueberry bushes, why not plant at least two different varieties? After all, blueberry varieties

from the “rabbiteye” group won’t even produce berries if you just plant one bush. They need to cross-pollinate to grow berries. But, even if you don’t grow rabbiteye blueberries, consider growing more than one var iety anyway. The “highbush” varieties are able to produce berries with just one bush, but you’ll get better results if you plant two highbush varieties.

Pick blueberries at their sweetest. Blueberries may not be completely ripe until one to three days after they turn blue. Could it be worthwhile to wait a day or two before harvesting those berries? Why not put it to the test? Clean and taste a few berries the day they turn blue. No matter when you decide to harvest most of the bush, tag a few newly blue berries and leave them on the bush for taste-testing. Sample several berries on each of the next three days. When you’re done you’ll know exactly when to pick to get the best-tasting blueberries.

Bushels and bushels of berries

By the Howard County

Farmers’ Market

Expected at Howard County Farmers’ Market fri., June 3:

Blueberries(peaches and blackberries soon) - from Daddy Bob’s

Farm-fresh eggs - from LTB Farms

F l o w e r s , f r e s h h o m e m a d e b r e a d , cinnamon rolls, coffee cakes, fresh radishes, pies, Amish peanut butter - from Regi and Laureen Hostetler

Sat., June 4: M o r e b l u e b e r r i e s

(peaches and blackberries soon) - from Daddy Bob’s

Free range farm-fresh eggs - from Kat’s Happy Chicks and more farm-fresh eggs - from LTB Farms

Herbal bath salts, jams and jellies, herbal soaps, some early produce - from Daddy Bob’s

F l o w e r s , f r e s h h o m e m a d e b r e a d , cinnamon rolls, coffee cakes, fresh radishes,

pies, Amish peanut butter (expected if enough made and left over from friday) - from Regi and Laureen Hostetler

Coming soon:Corn and pinto beans -

from Fulton FarmsPeaches - from Jamison

FarmsP e a c h e s a n d

blackberries - from Daddy Bob’s

Miscellaneous produce – from all our local growers starting to come off soon.

Be sure to check the Chamber of Commerce w e b s i t e a t w w w .nashvillear.com for what is expected at market each week.

Also, make sure you v is i t howard county farmers’ market facebook page and “like” it.

What’s expected at Howard County Farmers’ Market?

T h e 6 6 t h a n n u a l homecoming sponsored by the Belleville Cemetery Association will be held June 5, at the Belleville Church. The program will begin at 10:45 a.m. with speakers and singing.

A memorial service honoring those buried in the cemetery since the homecoming in 2010 will be part of the morning’s program.

A basket lunch will be spread on tables set up in the pavilion. The public is invited to bring their lawn chairs and share a good meal and fellowship with fami ly, f r iends, and neighbors after the morning’s program as no seating is available in the pavilion.

T h e c h u r c h a n d cemetery are located two

miles south of Lockesburg on Highway 71 then approximately 1/4 mile east on Highway 317. The church and pavilion are available for funeral services.

The Belleville Cemetery Association was organized in 1945 with the first homecoming held the following year.

T h e h o m e c o m i n g services were held at various times during the Spring months of the year until directors had the foresight to set a specifi c time for the homecoming. The fi rst Sunday in June of each year was selected.

A board of directors is elected to oversee the maintenance of the cemetery and church. Their terms are for three years with a partial board

elected each year. Anyone having family members buried in the cemetery or anyone having an interest in the cemetery is considered to be members of the association.

The cemeter y and church are maintained entirely from donations. Anyone unable to attend the homecoming and who wish to make a contribution to continue this work, may mail their donation to Belleville Cemetery Association, P.O. Box 41, Lockesburg, AR, 71846.

A l l d o n a t i o n s and par t ic ipat ion in homecoming activities are appreciated.

Belleville Cemetery Sixty-Sixth Annual Homecoming

We Can Insure Anyone!NO ONE IS TURNED DOWN!

FINAL EXPENSE BURIAL INSURANCE

AVAILABLE FOR ANYONE AGED 0-99!INSURANCE EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY

Lord, Kerusso & BolesLife Insurance Regardless of Illness or Disease

Jerry L. BolesGeneral Agent(870)845-2500(800)763-2950

Endorsed by Nashville Funeral Home

Happy BirthdayMrs. Annette Webb

Our perfect flower gone but not forgotten.Love, your mother, children,

grand & great grand

children

Sunrise

6-2-1939

Sunset

4-2-2010

Birdhouse building workshop at Grandview

June 15Join the Rick Evans Grandview Prairie

Conservation Education Center in Columbus on Wed., June 15, from 9-11 a.m. for this two-hour day workshop on building birdhouses.

This program is for ages eight and up. Participants will learn about the different homes that can be made for birds and will build a bluebird house.

Materials are provided and seating is limited so please call to register.

The workshop is free of charge but you must call to register in order to attend.

For more information, call Aneesah Rasheed at 870-983-2790.

LITTLE ROCK– Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, a museum of the Department of Arkansas Heritage, will celebrate its 3rd Annual Juneteenth festivities on June 18, from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the corner of Broadway and 9th Street in downtown Little Rock.

“Juneteenth is about remembering the struggles and hardships of enslaved African Americans, and celebrating their freedom and generations to come. John Bush and Chester Keats, former slaves built Mosaic Templars of America. It’s quite powerful that the Cultural Center now stands as the cornerstone and foundation of their dreams nearly a century later” Quantia Fletcher, Director of Education at the Cultural Center said.

Juneteenth, also referred to as Freedom Day or Emancipation Day, is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19 that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas, with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free.

Local community leaders will offi cially begin the day with a reading of the Juneteenth Proclamation at 12 p.m., followed by tours of the Cultural Center and a wide range of entertainment and free activities until 7 p.m. Saturday’s events include:

Zinse Agginie and the Drum Ballet of Hope;Bongo Willie Drumming Circle;Parkview Players living history characters;Gloryland Pastor’s Choir;The Auction Block theatrical performance;There will be oral history interviews, cultural

face painting and hair braiding, rock climbing wall, music, games, food, vendors and more. The Cultural Center would like to thank the following partners, including the Offi ce of Governor Mike Beebe, City of Little Rock, Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site, Arkansas Black History Commission, Minority Health Commission, and Central Arkansas Water. For a complete list of our partners, vendors, and activities, visit our website www.mosaictemplars.com.

The Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, a museum of the Department of Arkansas Heritage, is dedicated to telling the history of African Americans in Arkansas from 1870 to the present especially in the areas of politics, business and the arts. Other agencies of the Department of Arkansas Heritage include Arkansas Arts Council, Arkansas Historic Preservation, Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, Delta Cultural Center, Historic Arkansas Museum and Old State House Museum.

Juneteenth 2011: A Legacy of Freedom

The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission will be hosting a Hunter Education Course at Rick Evans Grandview Prairie Conservation Education Center in Columbus. Classes will start at 8 a.m. and end at 6 p.m. on Tues., June 14.

Bring a sack lunch, as lunch will not be provided.

The 10 hour course w i l l c o v e r s u b j e c t s such as conservation, sportsmanship, archery, muzzleloading, survival and fi rst aid, and fi rearms. You must attend the entire session and successfully c o m p l e t e a w r i t t e n examination to receive a hunter education card, which is honored in all states and provinces where hunter education is required.

It’s free and open to anyone though you must register to attend.

For more information, call Aneesah Rasheed at 870-983-2790.

H u n t e r education c o u r s e offered

Look for

on Facebook!

Page 4 • Thursday, June 2, 2011 • NASHVILLE NEWS

Home and Family

Clint and Betty Ramsey of Nashville are pleased

to announce the engagement and approach-ing marriage of their daughter, Jennifer Kay to Kyle Quentis Brumley, son of Quentis and Sue Brumley of Wil-lis, Oklahoma.

Jennifer is a 2004 graduate of Nashville High School. She graduated

from Oklahoma State Univer-sity Institute of Technology in 2008 and is currently employed as a graphic designer with the Chickasaw Nation in Ada, Oklahoma.

Kyle graduated from Kings-ton High School in 1994. He is a 1998 graduate of Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology and is employed as a Creative Director with the Chickasaw Nation in Ada, Oklahoma.

The wedding will take place at 6 in the evening on Oct. 1, 2011 at the First Baptist Church in Nashville.

Ramsey, Brumley to wed

Lifeline Ministry will celebrate its pastor and wife’s anniversary on Sun., June 5 at 3:30 p.m. at the church.

Shayla Miller, a Nashville fifth grader, presents her space shuttle at the annual space academy. Miller and other fifth graders presented their work at the closing ceremony of the Nashville Elementary Space Academy. The NESA honors the students who have completed a study of space exploration. All students became “certified space trainers,” Program Coordinator Becky Floyd said.

Photo by Cecil Harris

Lifeline Ministry to host anniversary

Kids ages four through seven can join us at the Rick Evans Grandview Prairie Conservation Education Cen-ter in Columbus on Thurs., June 9, from 9-11 a.m. for this two-hour day camp. Kinder Kamp theme will be “Fabulous Fish.”

There will be several fun activities related to fi sh. A responsible adult is required to stay on the premises. The workshop is free of charge but you must call to register in order to attend.

For more information, call Aneesah Rasheed at 870-983-2790.

Grandview to host ‘Kinder Kamp’

The Winter 2011 Crisis Intervention Home Energy Assistance Program has ended. Southwest Arkansas Development Council will no longer be taking applica-tions.

Energy assistance program has ended

DE QUEEN – Steve Cole, Chancellor of Cossatot Community College of the University of Arkansas, announced in the regu-lar session of Cossatot’s Board of Visitors meeting on Monday evening, May 23rd at the Ashdown Cam-pus that the University of Arkansas System Board of Trustees reappointed two of the Board’s current members, Kathy Beavert and Jay Dooley.

Kathy Beavert of Mur-freesboro has served on the CCCUA Board of Visi-tors since 2001. She also served on the College’s Board of Trustees from 1995-2001.

Jay Dooley of De Queen

has served on the CCCUA Board of Visitors since 2001.

Cole added, “Kathy and Jay have been a huge part of the evolution of our col-lege and it is nice to see that they both will have the opportunity to oversee even more positive growth in size and quality. Our Board of Visitors is com-prised of what I call “rock stars,” meaning that all nine surpass everyone’s expectations of profes-sionalism and leadership. It seems our college has perfect people in all posi-tions…at every level.”

Both Beavert and Dool-ey will serve six year terms that will end June 30, 2017.

CCCUA board reappointed

BENEFIT LUNCHEON for CALVIN BUICEpresented by the

OMEGA MEN

of FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Saturday, June 4th @ 10:00 am to 2:00 pm

at FBC (Main Street) Parking Lot

Carry-out fare, featuring: Smoked Chicken, Potato Salad, Barbeque

Beans, and Dessert

Cost: Donations Only!

ABOVE: The Eagles club presented a check for $250 to the Howard County Christian Health Clinic recently. Pictured are Bill Blakeley, Brenda Bassham, Billy Rosenbaum, Ralph Brezler, Gary Funderburk and Cay Teague.

KJEP-TVwww.kjep.tv

TELEVISION SCHEDULE

FOR LOCAL EVENT SHOWING TIMES, VISIT:

THIS COLUMN BROUGHT

TO YOU BY:

LOCKESBURG BRANCH

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3402 Camellia • Lockesburg • 870-289-2400 Equal Housing Lender

NASHVILLE NEWS • Thursday, June 2, 2011 • Page 5

**************

LOCKESBURGTIDBITS

By Susie Thompson and Donna Gallaher

Did youradvertised

garagesale getrainedout?

No worries ... simply bring the ad & paidreceipt back to the Nashville News and we willrun it again -- for free! It’s just another service

we provide our loyalcustomers in anattempt to betteraccomodate you.

June is busting out all over!!!! We know because company’s coming. It is time for the 66th Annual Bellville Homecoming sponsored by the Bellville Cemetery Association. It will be Sun., June 5 begin-ning with a program at 10:45 a.m. followed by a potluck basket lunch, with fun and catching up going on everywhere.

In case you haven’t been in awhile, (or per-chance have never been), everyone is welcome. Of course there is an oppor-tunity to fi nd out what is going on with the Cem-etery Association. They will accept donations.

If you can’t come and would like to correspond (or send money) their address is P. O. Box 41, Lockesburg, AR 71846. Every Saturday from 10-11 a.m. in the month of June the Lockesburg Library will have its 2011 Summer Reading Program. Read-

ers of all ages will travel the globe this summer as the Library presents “One World, Many Sto-ries” during their summer reading program. Children will explore places from around the world through stories, crafts, music, and other activities. The 2011 Summer Reading Program is open to Kindergarten through adult. Yes, this year we will have an adult program. Our progress will be recorded on a large world map. Every book read qualifi es the reader to one entry in a special prize drawing at the end of June.

The library is open Wednesdays and Thurs-days 9:30 a.m. to noon; 1-5 p.m. and Saturdays 9 - 12.The fi rst children’s program in “One World, Many Stories” begins this Sat., June 4. For more in-formation, call Ms. Wendy at the library at 289-2233. All programs are free of

charge. Don’t forget to check

out the new businesses in town. Drop in at Grubbs Heating & Air and Cindy’s Resale shop have opened at 3430 S. Camellia (the old peach shed). You can call Glen at (870) 784-1380, or Cindy at (870)784-3149. Their hours are Monday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

We do not have a Secret Good Samaritan this week. There could be several reasons for that. The one we are choosing is that we’ve been unobservant this week. We’ve been tied up in too many of our own activities to pay attention to the folks around us. So…we would still love a call from someone about someone doing something nice. It also is a reminder to ourselves that we are missing what truly is im-portant.

VBS at First Baptist is going to “The Big Apple” for the week. It will be held June 12 through June 16 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. for pre-schoolers through 12th graders. The excite-ment is building for the “trip” to visit the Big City.

There is also a kickoff event schedule for June 8 at 7 p.m. that will be a “Don’t Miss This Action Moment.

The Lockesburg Lion’s Club will meet on June 14 and June 28 at noon at the Bank of Lockesburg.

The Lockesburg City Council will meet on June 14 at 6:30 p.m. at Lockes-burg City Hall. The Provo Fire Department will hold Bingo and Burgers fund-raiser for the Little Britch-es rodeo on June 18.

There are only three weeks left until the June 15 silent auction is over at First Baptist Church on a hand crafted knife made by Ross Tyser of Spartanburg, S.C. Pictures of the knife are on the First Baptist Church of Lockesburg, AR Facebook page. You can also get some history on the knife maker at rtcustomknives.com. The high bid at the moment is still $330 and “Play Night” is each Thurs-day, beginning at 6 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of First Baptist Church for those people who just love to create something. Grab a project and come

“play.” If you want to bring a little potluck something to share that is always welcome as well.

The Annual Lockesburg Car Show will be held on Sat., July 2. If you have an old vehicle that you want to show off a little or a lot. Read Tidbits for contact information in the next week or so.

July 4 is fast approach-ing and believe it or not we got wind of some stuff hap-pening. We’ve been talk-ing about the Tomahawk Throw and that is looking more and more like it will happen. The National Guard is bringing a Foot-ball and a basketball Toss game. The packed picnic cooler to be raffl ed is go-ing to be given away that day. The fi reworks are or-dered and the concession stand is stocked. Now, all they need is you to come out and remember that this is a fundraiser along with everything else it is. The Ida Margaret Coulter Stone Park is operated by

sales from the concession stand and your donations. Please help keep it that way. There is still a lot in the “works.” The Park Commission/Committee needs members, volun-teers, and helpers for this event. There will be space for vendors and fund rais-ers. We got our thinking caps on and would like to suggest that some Relay for Life teams get an early start on 2012 on July 12.

A Single Shot Triple Bar-rel Rossi Set is on display at Baker’s Pawn Shop in De Queen. It is being raffl ed off for the Provo Volunteer Fire Department and will be given away at the Kids Rodeo and BBQ on Sept. 17. If you want tickets, contact any mem-ber of the Provo VFD, or at Baker’s.

To get items in Lockes-burg Tidbits, send e-mail to [email protected] or call her at (870) 784-0993. Our dead-line is Monday mornings at 9 a.m..

A drunk driver ruined something

precious. Amber Apodaca.

Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk.

Pho

to b

y M

ichael M

azzeo

HUGE 3 FAMILY SALE

Beds, Couch, TV’s, Table lamps, Fish Tank, Women, Men, Teen, &

Children Clothes

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THURS - SAT. 562 Blue Bayou RD“If you want it we probably got it”

Saturday OnlyGARAGE SALE

RAIN OR SHINE

587 Old Centerpoint Rd, Nashville Lots of girls, boys &

women’s clothes. Some miscellaneous household

items. Call Tonya at 870-688-4097 for

information or directions.

3 FAMILY YARD SALE

SATURDAY7-5• 814 S. Main

(at ECT Boutique)

furniture, TV, King size com-forter set, computer stand, coffee table set, to much to mention *COME EARLY*

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Some AntiquesTo Much To List**Great Stuff**

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Saturday Only8 a.m.-???

ACROSS FROM

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133 Valley View Lane

(1 blk S of Country Club

then right on Valley View)

Children & Adult Clothing,

tools, household items, toys,

books, sofa & recliner

YARDSALE

Pottery, Brass,

Baseball Cards,

Arrows, Clothes &

Misc

We are selling our junk

www.edwardjones.com Member CIPF

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Josh TiceFinancial Advisor.

106 South Main St

Nashville, AR 71852

870-451-9232

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Lights in the Night by Seasons of Cannon Falls

Now at Power Pharmacy

1310 S. 4th St. • 845-1413

Page 6 • Thursday, June 2, 2011 • NASHVILLE NEWS

MEMORIALFrom Page 1

EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS: 18ft Trailer, KubotaL185DT Tractor 4WD w/ front end loader andbush hog, Black Max 2 stage air compressors,Husqvarna chain saw and Weed Eater, tablesaw, router w/ table, router bits, bench grinder,large stump vice, Planer, Skill saw, Troy builtpressure washer (used twice), Sears tiller (likenew),1-535 Ridged pipe Threading machine,1725 Ford new Holland tractor w/ bush hog ATHfinishing mower 600, 1-304 CC/CV miller XMT 1or 3 Phase Power heavy Ind. welders (applica-tions Tig, mig, Air Arc, Stick), 1-250 Miller maticwire feed (carb. steel, stainless, alum), 1-250Ideal Arc Welder (Stick or Tig), 2-CC/CV XMTMiller 300, 2-Regency 200 , 1- Thermal Dynam-ics Pak Master 100 XL Plus, a bunch of Fiber-glass work ladders (some twin foot), a bunchof steel shelving, 3-pallet jacks, 1-20 ton Vikinghydraulic press (USA made), Chop saws, upright ROL-Air 80gal. compressor, 1-25 kw PTOdriven generator, Victor torches and regulators,

lots of lever type chain hoists, big vises, scaf-folding, 2 or 3 tripod levels, 3-drill presses,hand band saws, paint sprayers, heavy floorJacks, impact wrenches, hydrualic jacks, benchgrinder, miles of Extension cords, air hoses andcutting hoses (lots of them are new), handtools, ratchets, sockets, end wrenches of allsizes, Lots of power hand tools (mostly Mil-waukee), 7 or 8 big job equipment boxes.

HOUSEHOLD ITEMS: Gun Safe and (2) pistols,bedroom furniture, Kenmore refrigerator, GEfreezer, Kenmore dryer, elec. stove, large ChinaCabinet, Futon bed, Child's roll top desk, beau-tiful glassware in cobalt blue, 3 tone etagere(emerald green), Cranberry glasses, Ruby redpitcher, NRA collectable glasses w/ carrier, castiron Dutch ovens, NASCAR collectibles, bronzeEagle, plastic tables, and many more items, toonumerous to mention.

Gentry’s Auction ServiceJimmy Ray Gentry

AR Lic. #1658, LA Lic. #1230, TX Lic. #9828Office: 870-584-3339 Cell: 870-584-6460

www.gentrysauctionservice.com

Not responsible for theft, fire or accidents.All announcements made day of sale supersedes all other advertisements.

22496

2 DAY AUCTION

Charles Murry Estate Auction125 Farm to Market Rd, De Queen, AR

SATURDAY, JUNE 4 at 9 a.m. and

SUNDAY, JUNE 5 at 1 p.m.Directions: From Hwy 70/71 junction in De Queen, go East approximately

5 miles turn right on Farm to Market Road. Sale is at the 2nd house on left.

Saturday we will be auctioning tools and equipment starting at 9 a.m.

Sunday we will be moving on to the household items etc. starting at 1 p.m.

A healthy crowd is ex-pected to come and do just that. Pike County Judge Don Baker is set to deliver a keynote address at the unveiling, along with prayers led by Harold Turner and Bro. George Baker, a bagpipe tribute by Mike White and a pre-sentation of 20 white roses donated by Glenwood Florists.

The monument itself was purchased at cost from Fitch Memorial, of Mt. Plesant, and was fund-ed entirely by donations.

Events at the river bank will begin at 2 pm, followed by a service and dinner at Pilgrim Rest Church in Lodi, where many of the fl ood survivors were housed immediately fol-lowing the tragedy.

To RSVP for the din-ner, contact Penny Putz at 870-828-0394 or Graig Cowart at 870-223-1034.

pedite” the process of receiving the six-figure sum. A check for $3,700 is enclosed for the unsus-pecting “winner.”

The sum is then de-ducted from “your total winning of $120,000 to enable you [sic] pay for the applicable winning charges which is $2,700.”

As soon as the payment is acknowledged, “the bal-ance of your total winning - which is $119,300 - will be released to you either by cashier’s check, money order or wire transfer to your designated lo-cal bank account. Please do not attempt to use this check until you call and speak with the claim agent.”

“People do not need to cash the check or send money to anyone,” the sheriff said. “They will lose their money…it is a scam,” he ended.

Natural Resource Conser-vation Service, Arkansas Department of Workforce Education and the Arkan-sas Agriculture Depart-ment.

FARMFrom Page 1

SCAMFrom Page 1

Summer is here! Even if the calendar does not officially mark summer until mid-June, just step outside. Hot temperatures are upon us.

When you hear the words “summer safety” you may think about life-guards and sunscreen. But as you move into our sum-mer schedule, you need to think about consumer safety, too.

Identity theft is on the rise and it is more impor-tant now than ever that you take steps to prevent your identity from being stolen.

Here are some tips to help protect your money and personal identity as you swing into summer and as you travel during summer vacation.

Make sure you keep your purse or wallet with you and think about what you’re carrying in your wallet as you travel away from home.

Take time before you board the plane or leave your home to purge your purse or wallet of unnec-

essary items.It is important not to

carry your Social Secu-rity card in your purse or wallet. Your Social Se-curity card needs to stay at home or locked up in a safe place.

Make sure you only take the personal identifi cation you need and the particu-lar credit or debit cards you intend to use while you are away from home. Leave everything else in a secure location.

It is important to always check your receipts when you make a purchase, but be extra careful when traveling.

Anytime you make a purchase, be sure to check your sales receipt. If you are at a restaurant, store or gas station, al-ways check the receipt. It is important to make sure charges are accurate. Mistakes can happen and it’s much easier to correct the mistakes when you are still at the store than after your get back home.

If you find an over-charge, it can usually be

refunded to you as cash, depending on your meth-od of payment.

Or if you’ve used a cred-it card, the overcharge can be refunded as a credit to your account.

Finally, be really careful when you are using credit cards or debit cards on summer vacation.

It’s a good idea to go ahead and sign the card on the back so the sales clerk can check your signature to make sure that it’s ac-curate.

Make sure you always put your credit card back into your purse or wal-let after using it for pur-chases.

Take an envelope or small zippered wallet or purse with you to put your receipts in. Put all receipts in the envelope or wallet to have when you return home. Be especially careful about credit card receipts and keep them in a safe location.

Don’t leave them ly-ing around in your hotel room. Once you return home and no longer need the receipts for tax pur-poses or personal travel purposes, destroy the receipt by shredding it. Don’t throw any receipt

that has personal informa-tion on it, including your credit card number in the trash.

Lastly, when you return home and receive your credit card statement, be sure to look it over carefully to make sure the charges are correct. If you fi nd anything that looks suspicious, be sure to contact your credit card company as soon as possible.

Remember, never lend a credit card to anyone, never sign a blank credit card receipt and never leave any credit cards or receipts lying around in your hotel room.

It is sad to think there are dishonest people in the world, but the fact is there are.

Take steps to insure your identity safety. For more information on cred-it cards or to receive a free credit card register that can be used in the event your credit cards are sto-len, contact the Howard County Extension Offi ce at 870-845-7517 or visit our offi ce located on the second fl oor of the court-house.

You can also visit our website at www.uaex.edu

for more information re-garding fi nancial matters.

Recipe of the Week

This recipe was submit-ted by Caleb Shepherd, a member of Show-n-Shine 4-H Club.

He won fi rst place in the senior division in the 4-H Dairy Foods Contest held recently.

Sour Cream Pound

Cake

2 3/4 c. sugar 1 c. butter or margarine

6 eggs 3 c. sifted fl our 1/2 tsp. salt

1/4 tsp. soda1 c. sour cream1 tbsp. vanillaIn mixer bowl, cream

together sugar and butter until light and fl uffy. Add eggs one at a time, beat-ing well after each. Sift together flour, salt and soda; add to creamed mix-ture alternately with sour cream, beating after each addition.

Add vanilla, beat well. Pour batter into greased and fl oured 10in. tube pan. Bake in 350 degree oven for 1 1/2 hours or until done. Cool 15 minutes. Remove from pan.

May be garn ished with powdered sugar or fruit.

By Jean A. InceStaff chairman

UofA Cooperative Extension

Service • Howard County

It’s summer! Protect your skin from

sunburn and your credit from thieves

TOP: Ramon Wilson, Bobby Keaster, Judge Kevin Smith and Terry Sneed listen as Rotary District Manager Joe Fish speaks about seven influential men in Rotary.LEFT: Rotary District Manager Joe Fish speaks to the Nashville Rotary Club about the roots of Rotary International. Fish also gave an update on Rotary’s fight against Polio. Last year there were only 123 documented cases of Polio in the world.

Photos by Logan Webster

NASHVILLE NEWS • Thursday, June 2, 2011 • Page 7

Dierks

DIERKS – The Dierks Booster Club honored their athletes and their accomplishments dur-ing their annual Athletics Awards Banquet at the high school cafeteria.

Sixteen awards were handed out in football.

Jon Stapp – most im-proved player

Remington Jester – hus-tle award

Jordan Crow – leader-ship award and the Larry Reel Memorial Scholarship

Nick Moore – outstand-ing offensive back

Dillon Sharp – outstand-ing lineman

Brady Clifton – most valuable player, big hit award, leading tackler and Danny Miller Dedication

awardBrett Nut – leading re-

ceiver, off season awardJosh Tollett – outstand-

ing defensive backChris Icenhower – off

season award and special teams award

Kirby Allen – off season award

Members of the 7-2A All District football team: Honorable Mention – Sawyer Kesterson, Nick Moore, Dillon Sharp, Brett Nutt and Josh Tollett; All District – Jordan Crow and Brady Clifton.

Seven awards were pre-sented to the boy’s basket-ball team.

Hunter Alexander – leading rebounder and of-fensive player of the year

Sawyer Kesterson – de-fensive player of the year and most improved player

Caleb Dinger – free throw award and 3-point percentage

Braden Pennington – sixth man award

Remington Jester was named to the Honorable Mention 7-2A West All Dis-trict team.

Hunter Alexander was named to the 7-2A West All District basketball team.

Seven awards were presented to the baseball team.

Andrew Sirmon – big stick award

Tyler Mounts – most im-proved player

Adam Bradshaw – out-standing pitcher

Alex Sharp – outstand-ing infi elder

Maclane Moore – out-standing outfi elder

Nick Moore – outstand-ing catcher and Outlaws baseball award

Nick Moore and Sawyer Kesterson were named to the Honorable Mention 7-2A West District team.

7-2A West All-District

baseball team members were Alex Sharp, An-drew Sirmon and Austin Walston.

In track, Jake Tollett and Sawyer Kesterson quali-fi ed for the state meet and in golf Calan Tipton quali-fi ed for the state tourna-ment.

There were fi ve mem-bers of the cheer squad who received All-American recognition: Brittany Brad-shaw, Sarah Welch, Geor-dyn Ridley, Emily Brewer and Jessica Johnson.

Five awards were pre-sented in girl’s basketball.

Kendall Ayers – most re-bounds and best offensive player

Whitney Bennett – best defensive player

Sarah Cothren – best free throw percentage and leading scorer

15 awards were present-ed members of the softball team.

Hannah Dellinger – walks

Kori Clement – batting average, home runs, hits, singles and RBI’s

Tori Icenhower – runs scored and triples

Whitney Bennett – sto-len bases

Dakota Vance – team player award

Mary Brown – fl yball award

Honorable Mention 7-2A All District softball team members are Hannah Del-linger, Sarah Cothren, Whitney Bennett and Em-ily Brewer.

7-2A West All District softball team members are Caitlin Lites, Tori Icen-hower, Kori Clement, Mary Brown and Lori Hill.

Caitlin Lites was named to the 2A All State Softball team.

Hannah Dellinger and Sawyer Kesterson received the Edna Cox award.

Tori Icenhower was named Miss Outlaw and Nick Moore was named Mister Outlaw.

Todd and Kelly Moore were presented with an outstanding dedication award for their work with the Outlaw Booster Club throughout the year.

Athletes honored at Dierks booster club banquet

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Mr. Outlaw Nick Moore and Miss Lady Outlaw Tori Icenhower

Edna Cox award winners Hannah Dellinger and Sawyer Kesterson

Miss Stacy’s

NASHVILLEDANCE ACADEMY2011 Dance Recital

Miss Stacy’s Nashville Dance

Academy will have the 2011

Recital on Saturday, June 4

at 7:00 p.m. in the 6th Street

Auditorium. Admission is

$5 per person at the door;

children 5 & under free.

(870) 200-1118

Sign up Now for our summergymnastics classes!

#52 Southpark Shopping Center

Page 8 • Thursday, June 2, 2011 • NASHVILLE NEWS

4x6 for - $3.00

8½x11 - $7.00

11x17 - $10-12

We have a NEW PRINTER!

Get AMAZING Color Copies ofPhotos from The Newspaper!

Come by today or call at 870-845-2010!

Community EventsGOOD OL’ BOYS MEET

The Good ‘Ol Boys met May 19 and the next meeting is scheduled for Aug 18.Back row: James Chandler, Bill Chesshir, Pat Robbins, Jimmy Staggs, Mickey Bowden, Ed McCrary, Joe Dallas, Jerry Littlefield, Edwin Tollett, James Tollett, Conrad Dyer, James Jamison, Brice Westfall, Hix Smith Jr., Neely Cassady, Jerry Jacobs and Billy Fred Livingston.Front row: Russell McAlister, Haller Propps, Glen Privitt, Billy Neal Jones, Buddy Rhodes, J.C. Dyer, John Lyons, Bill Driggers, Ralph Balch, Bill Tommy, Don Coulter and Jim Shuffield.

Photo by Cecil Harris

Lindsey WhiteHoward County

4-H Program Assistant

Members of the How-ard County 4-H program recently donated books, chairs, and bean bags that they purchased with the money they raised from their annual book sale. The chairs and bean bags will be added to a special reading area for youth who visit the library. The books will be added to the

“4-H Special Collection” section of the library.

T h i s w a s H o w a rd County 4-H’s 4th year to conduct their book sale, with proceeds benefi tting the libraries of Howard County. Books were also donated this year to the Dierks Library. In previ-ous years, 4-H has donat-ed computers, computer games, books, and DVDs to area libraries.

The members of How-

ard County 4-H would like to invite you to visit the county libraries.

If you would like more information about 4-H, call the Howard County Exten-sion Offi ce at 845-7517.

4-H is open to all youth between the ages of 5 and 19 without regard to race, color, national origin, re-ligion, gender, disability, or any other legally pro-tected status.

Pictured are members of the 4-H Book Sale Committee. Front row: Joshua Rodgers and Cali Dauzat. Back row: Lauren Ince and Caleb Shepherd.

Submitted photo

Howard County 4-H makes library donations

The Hope Quilters’ Guild meeting will be held Mon., June 6, at 7 p.m. at the BankcorpSouth Build-ing (3rd and Elm), in Hope. The program will be “No Waste Square in a Square,” by Mittie Malone.

Contact Sue Bryson for more information at (870) 887-6286. Visitors and new members are always welcome.

H o p e Q u i l t e r s ’ Guild meeting set

NASHVILLE NEWS • Thursday, June 2, 2011 • Page 9

Sports

Track is located on Hwy 27 between Nashville and Murfreesboro

www.diamondparkspeedway.com

HERE COME THE RACE CARS!

COME ON OUT SATURDAY NIGHT FOR

SOME GREAT DIRT TRACK RACING AT

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GATES OPEN @ 5 P.M.

RACES START @ 8:00

$10 for adults, $5 seniors, $5 kids

10-18, & kids 9 & under FREE.

HARRIS PHOTOGRAPHY

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Halle Mounts throws out a runner at first base for Diamond Elite.

Joslynn Frachiseur (11) slides in safely at second base as the Fuzion battle the Fury from Foreman.

Kendall Kirchhoff makes contact as High Voltage rallies at the plate.

Mattie Jamison covers for Epic Threat as Kynnedi Gordon (10) of Shock slides in safely at second base.

A host of Chili Peppers converge on a ground ball as it tries to make its way through the infield. Pictured left to right: Adalyn Dunn (5), Dakota Smith, Klair Castleberry and Caroline Kesterson.

Left: Wild Ivy Coach Bryan McJunkins checks on Macy Bishop after a mishap at first base.

Brittany Hilliard works from the mound for High Voltage.

Photos by

Dewayne

Holloway

2011 Dinofest Softball Tournament highlights

HOWARD COUNTY

FARMER’S MARKET

HOME GROWN AND/OR HOME MADE!

This Ad Sponsored By: Crete Cast Products

Washington St (between Howard & Hempstead)

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Page 10 • Thursday, June 2, 2011 • NASHVILLE NEWS

Sports2011 Dierks Sports Banquet award winners

Members of the Dierks Senior class pictured left to right: Keri Wickson, Nick Moore, Brady Clifton, Jon Stapp, Mary Brown, Hannah Dellinger, Tori Icenhower, Sawyer Kesterson, Dillon Sharp and Jordan Crow.

Members of the Dierks Junior class pictured left to right: Kori Clement, Brett Nutt and Emily Brewer.

See page 7 for a full list of Dierks

Sports Banquet Award winners.

Photos by Dewayne Holloway.

Members of the Dierks Sophomore class pictured left to right: Kendall Ayers, Sarah Cothren, Austin Walston, Caitlin Lites, Chris Icenhower, Whitney Bennett, Kyle Davis, Alex Sharp, Remington Jester and Jenny Edge

Members of the Dierks Freshman class pictured left to right: Tyler Narens, Andrew Sirmon, Adam Bradshaw, Maclane Moore, Tyler Mounts and Andy Tedder.

2010 Dodge Ram 2500 SLT Crew Cab 4x4

2011 Chevrolet Impala

MSRP ....................................................................... $25,505less York Gary Discount .............................................. $2,006less Dealer Cash ............................................................ $3,500

$19,999

GM Certifi ed Used Inventory

2010 Pontiac G6 • 14K mi .................................................. $16,495

2010 Chevrolet Malibu • 34K mi ........................................ $16,995

2010 Chevrolet Impala LT • 21K mi ................................... $16,995

2008 Yukon Denali • 63K mi .............................................. $33,495

Buy any one of these and get 12 mo./12 K mi. additional warranty and get 1.9% APR

if fi nanced through Ally Financial

June Deals are Better than EVER!Take that vacation in a new or used vehicle from York Gary!

1420 W. Leslie • Nashville • 870-845-1536Visit us @ yorkgary.com

2011 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Crew Cab LSMSRP .......................................................................... $31,370less York Gary Discount .............................................. $2,375

less Customer Cash ...................................................... $4,505

$24,490* Less Commercial Offer ................................................. $500

$23,990* Must own a business or farm.

2011 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Ext. Cab

Just one

Like it!

Only One

Left!

DEMO

MSRP ...........................................$27,320less York Gary Discount .......................$3,327

less Customer Cash ..........................................$4,505

$19,488* Less Commercial Offer .................................................$500

$18,988

0% APR available in lieu of customer cash!

0% APR available in lieu of customer cash!

0% APR available in lieu of customer cash!

MSRP ................................................................................................$47,460less York Gary Discount ..................................................................$10,465

$36,995

Last

2010 LEFT!

HURRY!

0% APR available in lieu of customer cash!

Turbo Diesel, Pwr Heated Trailor Tow Mirrors, Trailor Brake Controller

NASHVILLE NEWS • Thursday, June 2, 2011 • Page 11

Mineral Springs

The Mineral Springs Elementary School had the end of the year awards program in the gym Friday.Parents and families were invited to attend. Principal Jeanie Gorham gave out awards for honor roll, academic excellence, science fair winners and perfect attendance. Star students were awarded for leadership and citizenship for this quarter.The Principal’s Award went to sixth grade students who have an excellent record in test scores, grades, attendance and community service for their entire elementary career. The school also honored retiring fifth and sixth grade teacher Pam Wendell. Pictured are Star Students: Back row: Braden Schooley-Williams, Tahji Beal, Stephen Denney, Lexie Holden, Chase Murphy, Cameron Butler and Esteban Bravo.

Front row: Kemberly Gonzales, KeiJuan Hicks, Parker Pry and Matthew Lindsey.

Fifth graders Martecia Walton and Anjil Perkins praise Pam Wendell for her retiree award from her students.

Nurse Monden and little brother, Maddox “Monkey” Monden, hug Haylee after winning her award.

David Marts jumped up and yelled “Yes!!” for his improvement award.

Vincent Edwards and daughter Raven are proud of her Honor Roll and Science Award.

AT LEFT:James “Sarge” Slatton and Peyton Parker are proud

Peyton’s award.

The Todd Young family are proud of their daughter Anjil (left).

Principal’s Award goes to: Raven Edwards, Nyzhani Martinez-Smith, Alex Jackson, Kirby Adcock, Chase Murphy and Miriam Mondragon.

END OF THE YEAR AWARDS AT MINERAL SPRINGS

The Corinth First Baptist Church in Mineral Springs will host the 36th Appreciation Service for Rev. Wil-liam H. Mitchell and his wife. The service will be held on June 12 at 2:30 p.m. at the church.

Corinth Church to host pastor, wife appreciation

**WAC + TT&L, 8% Int.- $2,000 Down Cash or Trade*see dealer for details

(888)777-4701 or (800)467-2054

‘10 Chevrolet 1500 Crew Cab LT4 Big Doors, V-8, Local Trade

$399/72 or $24,980

‘10 Ford Edge SELDual Power Seats, Lots of Room

$339/72 or $20,980

‘10 Ford Fusion SEAll power, 4-door, CD

$279/60 or $15,980

‘07 Chevrolet Tahoe LT3rd Row Seat, Rear A/C, Local Trade #B2440A

$319/60 or $17,980

‘07 Ford Expedition LimitedLeather, Loaded, Lots of Extras

$399/60 or $22,980

‘08 Ford F-350 Crew Cab DuallySkirted Flat Bed, Diesel, Auto, Local

Call for Pricing

‘09 Dodge 1500 Quad Cab 4x44 Wheel Drive, SLT, 4 Doors

$389/72 or $23,980

‘09 Chevrolet Traverse LTV-6, 20,000 miles, DVD

$399/72 or $24,980

‘05 Ford F-150 Reg CabAuto, A/C, Low Miles

Only $9,980

‘07 GMC Yukon DenaliLuxury and Loaded, Vacation Ready

$479/72 or $28,980

HUGE SAVINGS!

‘06 Ford F-150 Crew Cab 4x4Lariat, 4 Big Doors, Leather, New Tires

$319/72 or $19,980

THE A

LL

NEW

‘08 Chevrolet Ext Cab 1500V-8, Auto, 50,000 miles$279/72 or $17,980

Hwy. 278 & I-30 • Hope, AR

418 N. Main • Nashville, AR(870) 845-2010

Toll Free 1-888-845-NEWS

...for all your Printing Needs - See Us First!Envelopes - Business Cards - Invoices - Church Bulletins -

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The Nashville NewsCall Bobby Chambers • 870-845-2010

Need Offi ce Supplies? • We’ve got them too!

Paper, Register Tape, Sales Books, Fax Cartridges,

STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDSCall Eva or Linda at 1-800-569-8762 to place your ad here!

Week of 5-30-11

HELP WANTEDFOREMAN - to lead utility fi eld crews. Outdoor physical work, many positions, paid training, $17hr. plus weekly per-formance bonuses after promotion, liv-ing allowance when traveling, company truck and benefi ts. Must have strong leadership skills, good driving history, and able to travel in Arkansas and near-by States. Email resume to [email protected] or apply on line at www.OsmoseUtilities.com EOE M/F/D/V

“Can You Dig It?” - Heavy Equipment School. 3wk training program. Back-hoes, Bulldozers, Trackhoes. Local job placement asst. Start digging dirt Now. 866-362-6497

SALES PROFESSIONAL NEEDED - Most earn $50K-$100K or more. Call our branch offi ce at 800-791-4914. Ask for John or e-mail [email protected]

NOW HIRING - Companies Desperately Need Employees to Assemble Products at Home. No Selling, Any Hours. $500 weekly potential. Info. 1-985-646-1700 Dept. AR-2270

HELP WANTED - TRUCK DRIVERS

Drivers - Want to be part of a team, not a number? Good home time, pay & excellent benefi ts. Minimum of 1 year OTR fl atbed experience. Diamond State Trucking, Inc. Call 1-800-332-5551

Earn The Paycheck You Deserve - with our High Miles and Outstanding Starting Pay! 2-day orientation. Excellent benefi ts & equipment. $500 Sign-On for Flatbed. CDL-A, 6mo. OTR. 888-801-5295

Driver - Pay Raise just announced! Company, Owner Operators, solos & teams. Consistent miles, benefi ts, all new trucks. CDL-A & 15 mos exp. req drivefortango.com 877.826.4605

Earn up to $2.00/mi! - Save up to 32¢/gallon with our Fuel Discount Network! Small Fleet Owners or Owner Operators needed for OTR Flatbed. 1-800-743-0435

Quality Drive-Away, Inc. - is seeking 40 CDL qualifi ed drivers to deliver new trucks and buses. We are the exclusive transporter for Collins Bus in Hutchinson, KS and have fi ve regional offi ces with other large contracts. Call today 1-866-764-1601 or visit www.qualitydriveaway.com.

Drivers - DRIVE RED! Regional Van Drivers start at 37 to 41.5cpm w/1yr experience. REGULAR HOMETIME. Great Benefi ts. Paid Holidays. Call 888-362-8608, or visit AVERITTcareers.com. EOE.

Drivers/CDL Training - CAREER CENTRAL NO MONEY DOWN CDL TRAINING Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportuni-ties. *Trainee *Company Driver *LEASE OPERATOR Earn up to $51k *LEASE TRAINERS Earn up to $80k (877) 369-7120 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com

MISCELLANEOUSDISH Network delivers more for less! - Packages starting at $24.99/mo, Lo-cal channels included! FREE HD for life! Free BLOCKBUSTER® movies for 3 months. 1-866-980-0106

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE - from home. Medical * Business * Paralegal * Accounting * Criminal Justice. Job place-ment assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualifi ed. Call 877-596-6796 www.CenturaOnline.com.

DIVORCE DOCUMENTS - for $149.00. Includes name change documents and marital settlement agreement. BANK-RUPTCY $125.00 WILLS $49.00. CRIM-INAL EXPUNGEMENTS $49.00. POW-ER OF ATTORNEY $39.00 Money Back Guarantee Call 24/7: 1-888-789-0198

TRAINING/EDUCATIONTRUCK DRIVER TRAINEES - Com-plete your training in less than 30 days. Tuition Assistance for those who qualify available through the Arkansas Work-force Center Southwest District. Call Shawnaa Flanigan, 870-234-4030 or 1-866-994-9223 or contact: PINE BLUFF TRUCK DRIVING SCHOOL, INC. 1-800-954-4981 www.pbtds.net, lic. by ASB-PCE

AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualifi ed - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877) 424-4177.

REAL ESTATELAND LIQUIDATION - 20 Acres $0 Down $99/mo. ONLY $12,900 Near El Paso, TX Owner Financing, NO CREDIT CHECKS! Money Back Guarantee FREE Color Brochure *866-755-8953*

EDUCATIONMedical Management Careers start here - Get connected online. Attend col-lege on your own time. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Finan-cial Aid if qualifi ed. Call 800-481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com

ADOPTION

CSWEET CORN

Taking orders now!Corn ready about June 1�th

ESAU’S - DUMAS, ARCall 870-382-5738 or 870-382-2623

HOCOTT’SGarden Center

All Annuals & PerennialsBuy 5 get 1 FREE!

3612 Kavanaugh • 501.663.8376

Dedicated Truck

Driving Positions

Predictable Work Schedule

Experienced Truck Drivers

schneiderjobs.com/newjobs

1-800-44-PRIDE

EOE M/F/D/V

A BETTER OPTION

PROFESSIONAL CLASS A DRIVERSSmall co. atmosphere/LARGE co. benefits.OTR tractor trailer,good pay, Great home

time,health ins., 401K, pd vacation pkg/top equip.! Call Blake @888-967-5737

www.driveforpamtransport.com eeocInexperienced drivers or refreshers, call Lavonna

@ 877-440-7890 or 888-283-0038, or see website - www.pamdrivers.com

$ SIGN-ON BONU$

A devoted loving married couple longs to adopt

newborn. We promise a bright, loving & secure future.

Expenses paid. Please call Michele & Bob @ 1-877-328-8296

ADOPT

$0 DOWN, $1 BUYOUTLEASE PURCHASE

1-800-509-2021www.oandstrucking.com

Some Company Positions Available

• $.92 cpm

• Service Pay

• No Credit

Check

• Utilization Pay

• Walkaway Lease

CAREFUL! THIS JOB IS LOADED With EXTRAS & BENEFITS)HIRING: EXP. DRIVERS/ OWNER OPERATORS -

Mostly drop & hook! Home most weeks! Local Dispatch/Orientation/Shop , No-Touch Freight! Major Medical Insurance Available. 888-202-3569 ext 114 • Nights/Weekends, 501-240-7348 (Rita) or 501-247-7511, email: [email protected] • Freight Systems, NLR.

Become a TRUCK DRIVER IN LESS THAN 30 DAYS! !

Tuition Reimbursement Available if Qualified!

Classes Start Every Monday! Financing Avail. • Lodging Provided!

PINE BLUFF TRUCK DRIVING SCHOOL, INC. CALL TODAY!

1-800-954-4981 www.pbtds.netThe RIGHT TRAINING for today’s trucking industry

lic. by ASBPCE

Page 12 • Thursday, June 2, 2011 • NASHVILLE NEWS

Friday-SundayJune 3-5, 2011

Answers on

Pg. 3

For Sale: electric wheelchairs, portable, lightweight, like new. Low $ or perhaps free to senior. 888-442-3390 (WG:4-tf) ___________________________Pronto electric handicap chair in excellent condition. $650 for li� & chair. (870) 845-3727 or 451-3493. (dj:tf)___________________________Kubota zero-turn ZD21 lawn mower, 60 in. Pride deck. $6,800. Call (870) 703-2829 (lw:33-34) ___________________________Absolute Bargain - New pillow-top mattress set. Has manufacturer’s warranty. Twin $78, Full $98, Queen $138, King $168. Call (903) 276-9354 (Pd:37-44) ___________________________

70/71. (870) 642-7321 or 584-7837. (BH:86-tf, 20w) ___________________________We buy/sell Brahman heifers. (870) 451-4189 (mg:tf) ___________________________

Certi� ed Spanish teacher looking to babysit during summer months. For more info, call (870) 200-0977. (Pd:42-46; w14) ___________________________

Septic tank pumping and drain cleaning service, sewer lines/drains unstopped. Johnson Services, (870) 642-2787 (LJ:27-tf, 13w) ___________________________Jimmy Don Sullivan Welding & Construction Service, 845-4752, licensed septic tank installation. (JDS:tf; w12) ___________________________� e Terminator Pest Control (870) 557-1780. (tf) __________________________Hostetler Mowing - dependable lawn care. (870) 557-4510 (RH:20-tf; w6) ___________________________Tennis lessons, private or group. (870) 845-8505 (dh:tf) ___________________________Ward Shavings LLC - dry shavings $1,350/van load. (870) 285-3377 (WS:89-tf; w9) ___________________________

Modern cast-iron bathtub $100. (870) 286-2085 (Pd:42-45) ___________________________Oak roll top desk $425, oak 4-drawer file cabinet $100, oak computer desk $100, marble-top Bombay dressers $200. Call (870) 200-2713 (Pd:42-44) ___________________________

90 Dodge Ram PK Shortbed, Red, Low mileage, 870-292-9963 (Pd:45-47) ___________________________

Need Certi� ed Service Technician/Mechanic - Must have own tools. Commissioned salary based on experience. Fill out application or bring resume to DeQueen Ford-Chrysler in DeQueen, AR. (DQF:95-tf, 27w) ___________________________Drivers Wanted - Home Daily, Paid Weekly, Owner Operator and Company Dirvers! Immediate Positions Available! Call for Details - 214-864-6163 (Pd: 44-47) ___________________________Man Power in Hope now hiring for forkli� operator in Nashville, com-puter & barcode scanner skills a must, 870-777-0365 (MP:44-46) ___________________________

Furnished apartments for rent, utilities paid, 1403 S. Main, two blocks from Tyson, call Hal Scrog-gins, 845-1691. (tf)___________________________Peach Tree Trailer Park, 2 and 3 bedrooms, furnished, conveniently located laundry. 845-1355 or 845-2943 (PT:18-tf, w15) ___________________________Murfreesboro Mini Storage and

Maxi Storage. 845-1870 or 845-3168 (GS:tf, w9) ___________________________Portable toilets for construction jobs and special events. Lonnie Johnson, (870) 642-2787. (LJ:tf, w11) ___________________________2 & 3 BR trailers for rent. (870) 845-2940. (SBMH:62-tf; w8) __________________________Apartments for rent. 451-3940 or 845-9333 (PV:tf, w6) ___________________________Modern brick apartments for rent, contact Bill @ � e Agency, 845-1011. (TA:tf, w11) ___________________________3 BR, 1½ BA, CH/A, $500/mo, ref-erences & deposit required. (870) 845-2145 (SJ:42-tf; 13) __________________________

3/2 with land. Must sell fast! Call anytime (903) 831-4540 (SH:96-tf, w10) ___________________________Bingham Manufactured Homes - Invest your income tax refund! Come see our new � oor plans and prices. 4 miles east of DeQueen, Hwy 70/71 (371). (870) 642-7321 or 584-7837. (BH:25-tf; w25) ___________________________Renters wanted. Call for info: (903) 831-6014 (SH:96-tf; w6) ___________________________4/2 on land. Ready to move in. My loss, your gain! Call Now (903) 838-7324 (SH:96-tf; w14) __________________________Have 3 homes for sale. Call now - 24 hrs. (903) 831-6412 (SH:96-tf; w10) __________________________

Bingham Trailers: Cattle, cargo, equipment, horse, utility, conces-sion... Inventory reduction sale. 4 miles east of DeQueen, Hwy

NASHVILLE NEWS • Thursday, June 2, 2011 • Page 13

** Call The Nashville News (870) 845-2010 or The Murfreesboro Diamond (870) 285-2723 for rates, dates or questions **

We strive for accuracy, though occasionally er-rors do occur. Please notify us immediately if your ad has a mistake in it, so that we may cor-rect it and give you a free rerun for the � rst day that it ran incorrect-ly. Mistakes not brought to our attention before the second printing of the ad are eligible for one free corrected ad only!For more information and assistance regarding the investigation of � -nancing or business op-portunities, � e Nash-

ville News urges our readers to contact the Better Business Bureau of Arkansas, 12521 Can-nis Rd., Little Rock, AR 72211 or phone (501) 665-7274 or 1-800-482-8448.

WANTED TO BUYTIMBER AND TIMBERLAND

4300 Gazola St. • Texarkana, TX(903) 838-5836

Jimmy Miller 1-800-8TIMBER

We buy pine & hardwood sawlogs & pulpwood. We will buy your tract in

the bulk or by scale, with weekly settlements. We will cruise your timber

& give you a FREE ESTIMATE with no obligation to you.

J.W. MILLER TIMBER CO., INC.

MILLWOOD CORPORATION

Offi ce:800-647-6455

BUYER OF TIMBER & TIMBERLAND

P.O. Box 1316Hope, AR 71802

Matt Tollett (870) 845-5582

Johnny Porter - (870) 777-3774

J.K. Porter Jason Porter RF#987

Turner Electric

P.O. Box 459

Dierks, Arkansas

Ryan Turner, Owner

Phone:

(870) 286-2442

Cell: (870) 845-9299

• Residential• Commercial• IndustrialLicensedBonded& Insured

Smith’s Mini Storage Units available in

Nashville & Mineral Springs

(870) 845-5075

CARLTONMINI STORAGE

(870) 845-3560

SANDY BRANCH

MOBILE HOMES

We have your mobile home needs.SALES, SERVICE, RENTAL & MOVING

Financing Available! 8:00-5:00

(870) 845-2940

H&H LITTER SERVICE

Poultry House Clean-out

Rusty Hostetler

(870) 557-0143

The Agency Realty & Premier Mortage

Bill FrittsPrinciple Broker &

Loan Offi cer

101 S. Main Street

Nashville, AR 71852

870-845-1011 or [email protected]

www.theagencyrealty.net

HOSTETLER MOWING

Dependable Lawn CareCommercial & Residential

Leaf Cleanup

(870) 557-

4510 Nashville

For all your printing needs:

Self-inking Stamps, Business

Cards, Offi ce Supplies, Paper& Commercial Printing!

418 N. Main St., Nashville or

call

(870) 845-2010Send your ads to: [email protected]

www.nashvillenews.org(870) 845-2010

FULL TIME POSITION AVAILABLE SOON

HOWARD COUNTY CHILDREN’S CENTER

Classroom Instructor: Working with developmentally

disabled adults in a small group setting. Will be teaching

basic living skills: simple cooking, socialization, safety, money skills, leisure skills, and community awareness.

Work Schedule: Monday thru Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.All candidates must be able to pass criminal records back-

ground check, pre-employment drug test and provide proof

of high school diploma or equivalency. EOE

Applications may be completed at HCCC Inc.

1577 Hwy 371 W, Nashville, AR 71852No Phone Calls Please

3 Bedroom – 2 Bath - 4.31 acres 115 Stone Lake Road is situated in a rural

sub-division and overlooks a 10 acre lake. A ranch style brick home with 2,001 sq. ft. liv-ing space, attached 2 vehicle garage, ceramic and carpet fl oor coverings, living room/den combination has a WBFP, formal dining room, kitchen has an extra eating area, large back yard with a nice patio area. Call for an appointment to see this beautiful property. This almost new home lists for only $169,900.

www.rayandassociates.net Call for your personal tour today!

Ray & Associates Real Estate724 S. Main St., Nashville

(870) 845-2900 • (870) 904-0293Terry Ray 845-7757 • Sharla Parrish 845-7079

HOWARD COUNTY

CHILDREN’S CENTER

PART TIME POSITION

Need a LIVE-IN COMPANION for a developmen-

tally disabled male. Will be providing training in

meal preparation, cleaning, laundry, shopping, mon-

ey management, grooming, leisure time activities and

health and safety issues.

Part Time Schedule:

Friday, 3:30 pm - Sunday, 3:30 pm, continuousMust be able to pass criminal records background

check, pre-employment drug test and provide proof

of high school diploma or equiv. E.O.E. Please, No

Phone Calls.

Applications may be completed at HCCC Inc., 1577 Hwy 371 West, Nashville, AR 71852.

HOWARD COUNTY

CHILDREN’S CENTERClient Instructor, Group Home

Part Time Position - Working with developmentally disabled adult males, in a Group Home setting. Job consists of work-ing with individuals on shopping, laundry, cooking, house-keeping, money management and socialization skills. Work schedule: evenings and part of each weekend (approximately 20 hours per week).Must be able to pass criminal records background check, pre-employment drug test and provide proof of high school diploma or equiv. E.O.E. Please, No Phone Calls.

Applications may be completed at HCCC Inc., 1577 Hwy 371 West, Nashville, AR 71852.

Page 14 • Thursday, June 2, 2011 • NASHVILLE NEWS

HALFTHE STRING TAG

THIS FRIDAY! 12-9 PM! ONE DAY ONLY!

PRICEON ALL LIVING ROOM, BEDROOM, AND DINING ROOM FURNITURE!

SALE!IT’S OUR FAMOUS HALF PRICE SALE!

FRIDAY 12PM-9PM

This special “half price sale” is for 9 hours only. This Friday only.No phone orders. No C.O.D.s. All sales are final and all purchases must be removed from our premises within 10 days. Local delivery is extra. These are absolutely the lowest prices that we offer on our total stock of quality home furnishings. All appliances and electronics are reduced for cash. Photos for illustrative purposes only.

THIS IS WHEN WE OFFER OUR TOTAL INVENTORY OF

QUALITY HOME FURNISHINGS AT OUR LOWEST PRICES

OF THE YEAR. ALL FURNITURE IS HALF OUR STRING-TAG

PRICE! ALL ACCESSORIES ARE 10% OFF. APPLIANCES AND

ELECTRONICS ARE PRICED AS TAGGED. DUE TO THE EXTREME

LOW PRICES ALL SALES ARE FINAL. PURCHASES ARE TO BE

REMOVED FROM OUR PREMISES WITHIN TEN DAYS. BRING

YOUR CHECKBOOK, CASH, VISA, DISCOVER, MASTER CARD

OR GOOD CREDIT. 12 MONTHS NO INTEREST FINANCING IS

AVAILABLE ON APPROVAL THROUGH OUTSIDE FINANCING.

IF YOU MISS THIS SAVINGS EVENT YOU WILL PAY TOO MUCH!

Visit us on the web at: www.ivansmith.com

FR IDAY 12 NOON-9PM!


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