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Sarah Stempski, MPHc Elizabeth Bennett, MPH, CHES

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Sarah Stempski, MPHc Elizabeth Bennett, MPH, CHES. CPPW Everyone Swims! Phase 2: Focus Groups. November 29, 2010. Everyone Swims! Goal. Increase widespread access to pools and water recreation throughout King County among low income and culturally/ethnically diverse populations. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation
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  • Sarah Stempski, MPHcElizabeth Bennett, MPH, CHES

    CPPW Everyone Swims! Phase 2: Focus GroupsNovember 29, 2010

  • Everyone Swims! GoalIncrease widespread access to pools and water recreation throughout King County among low income and culturally/ethnically diverse populations Phase 2 goal: Examine current policies and systems, and identify barriers and opportunities from the perspectives of families

  • Why we are hereII. Compare themes from partners and focus groupsI. Share themes: What have families said?Linking to CPPW overall goals: increase physical activitydecrease smoking ratesreduce health inequitiesPolicy and Systems Opportunities and Barriers What well focus on

  • In the MediaMore recent news headlinesBlacks dont swim November 1, 2010; U.S. Masters SwimmingSwimming lessons do not increase drowning risk in younger children: Study allays concern the lessons could increase risk by reducing parental vigilance March 2, 2009; NIH NewsKids, adults need to get into the swim of things: Data show two key barriers prevent children from learning to swimfear of drowning, and lack of parental encouragement August 28, 2010; Walla Walla Union Bulletin

  • MethodsDesign focus group questionnaire based on precede-proceed behavior theory identifying the predisposing, enabling and reinforcing factors associated with swimming1Predisposing factors are antecedents to behavioral change that provide the rational or motivation for the behavior.Enabling factors are antecedents to behavioral or environmental change that allow a motivation to be realized.Reinforcing factors are factors following a behavior that provide the continuing reward or incentive for the persistence of the behavior.

  • MethodsChildrens IRB approval for project exempt status Work with partners to recruit families representing populations of focus in grantIncentives: Focus group participants were given a grocery gift card, child care to attend the meeting, and light snacksMeetings conducted by culturally appropriate moderator throughout November in clinics and community centersGroups are convenience sample and not fully representative Notes transcribed during focus group discussionsDevelop themes for review with partners to identify key opportunities and barriers

  • Demographics of Focus GroupsScheduled meetings: 5 Seattle Childrens: Spanish Speaking parents from Renton and Federal Way Odessa Brown Community Clinic: African American Families who participate in a special swim program at Medgar Evers from south and central SeattleColumbia Health Center (2): Somali and Vietnamese families who come to the clinic George Pocock Rowing Foundation: Group of people who participate in boating programs

  • Behavior Theory

  • Predisposing FactorsKnowing about scholarshipsInformation about registration processBeliefs about swimming as a life skillAccess to current informationLanguage, time and money constraintsAdult water phobiasWater cleanliness

  • Enabling FactorsKnowing what to expect at the poolFlexible swimwear policiesEase and transparency of scholarship processEase of registration processProgramming offered at multiple timesProgramming offered for special groupsInformation about importance of swimming from a trusted source Having the proper equipment

  • Reinforcing FactorsBeing involved in a special group programSwim teachers and pool staff that are attentive and kindReminder phone callsLearning new skills/making progressEase of re-enrollmentBenefits (learning new skill, exercise, etc) are perceived to outweigh the costs (time, money, effort, etc)

  • Themes (preliminary)

  • Scholarships for swim programmingFocus Group ThemesApplying requires multiple tries and is embarrassingQualification requirements should be listed so they know if they qualify before they applyFamilies dont know about scholarship opportunitiesRecap: Partner ThemesEnsuring that swimmers value programming Need for a more efficient approval process Restrictions by age, programming, residency varyAvailability of funds not always advertised

  • Screening for Swim AbilityThemesDoctors are viewed as a trusted source of information about the importance swimmingSome families do not think of swimming as an activity or skill They should have something to give to the families about swimming Recap: Partner ThemesSome providers are champions Screening based on guidelines or other standardized toolsTime perceived as a barrier for some clinicsNeed to have resources to provide if bring up question

  • Referrals to Pools and Water Rec ProgramsFocus Group Themes It would help lessen the confusion of finding a poolSpecial programs or partnerships are appreciated by those involved in programsClinic staff are trusted, but need to give parents optionsRecap: Partner Themes Informal referrals (web-based searching)Personal knowledgeWater partners unaware of referrals from clinicsClinics need updated resources on handSome clinics have formalized referrals for pools

  • Programming for special populationsThemesParent-child swim lessons wanted, should allow multiple children with parentAdult water phobiasChildren will be less embarrassed if there are other kids like themGender only swims viewed as pools making effort to include all culturesRecap: Partner ThemesParent-child swim lessons not commonAdult water phobiasWater exercise class is attended by older populationsPartnering to provide programming for certain populationsWorking hard to meet gender only swimming needs

  • Additional Barriers for these groupsThemesAcceptable swimwear is really important to feel included Concern about water being cleanFinding out about swimming opportunities in places common to culture Discrimination at pools is a concern

    Recap: Partner ThemesAcceptable swimwearGreat value placed on provider advice Assumption that people know what to do at pools

  • Next steps

  • Next Steps: Immediate Action PlanFollow-up with lessons learned from todays meeting

    II. Add to themes from remaining focus groups and be thinking about prioritizing model policies based on opportunities and barriers

  • Next Steps: Communication PlanDevelop profile of different audiences based on focus groupsFamilies Physicians Clinic staff Pool staff Others who influence families decisions related to water recreation

  • Next Steps: Communication PlanDevelop key messages for providersDevelop key messages for familiesDecide what kinds of materials or communication are most likely to be effectiveTest messages and materials with the audiencesFinalize materials

  • Next Steps: Action Plan Narrow focus to the key elements of policies and systems to increase access Prioritize policy and system components

  • CPPW Everyone Swims!

    Thank you for your time, dedication, and insight!November 29, 2010

    ****Ali, Naji. Blacks dont swim. U.S. Masters Swimming. November 1, 2010. http://www.usms.org/articles/articledisplay.php?a=294

    Hagar, S. Jorgenson, J. Kids, adults need to get into the swim of things: Data show two key barriers prevent children from learning to swimfear of drowning, and lack of parental encouragement. Walla Walla Union Bulletin. August 28, 2010. Available at: http://union-bulletin.com/stories/2010/8/28/kids-adults-need-to-get-into-swim-of-things

    Bock, Robert. Swimming lessons do not increase drowning risk in young children: Study allays concern the lessons could increase risk by reducing parental vigilance. NIH News. March 2, 2009. http://www.nih.gov/news/health/mar2009/nichd-02a.htm

    *1. Glanz, Karen, Barbara K. Rimer, and Frances M. Lewis. Health Behavior and Health Education: Theory, Research, and Practice. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2002. *1. Glanz, Karen, Barbara K. Rimer, and Frances M. Lewis. Health Behavior and Health Education: Theory, Research, and Practice. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2002. *Organizations in blue have focus groups scheduled, but have not been completed yet. Areas include only groups that have been conducted.**Predisposing factors are antecedents to behavioral change that provide the rational or motivation for the behavior.*Enabling factors are antecedents to behavioral or environmental change that allow a motivation to be realized.*Reinforcing factors are factors following a behavior that provide the continuing reward or incentive for the persistence of the behavior. ************

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