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Top Ten Reasons to Become a Professional Engineer

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Top Ten Reasons to Become a Professional Engineer. March 2005. But first, what is a professional engineer?. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation
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  • Top Ten Reasons to Become a Professional EngineerMarch 2005

  • But first, what is a professional engineer?A professional engineer ( P.E.) is a person who is licensed to practice engineering in a particular state or US territory after meeting all requirements of the law. To practice in multiple states or territories, the P.E. must be licensed in each state in which he or she wishes to practice.

  • OVERVIEW Legal Requirements for Engineering PracticeProfessional Registration ProcessFE and PE Examination SpecificationsStrategies for Passing the ExamsStudy MaterialsAnswers to Common QuestionsWhy Become a Licensed Professional Engineer?

  • LEGAL REQUIREMENTS All States have Registration Laws Governing the Practice of EngineeringMost States prohibit persons who are not registered PEs from:advertising, using a business card, or otherwise indicating that they are an engineerpracticing, offering to practice or by any implication holding themselves out as qualified to practice as an engineerExemptions for Industrial Practice

  • What are the requirements to become licensed as a P.E.?Education (ABET/EAC)FE Exam (EIT)Experience (4 years)PE Exam (P&PE)

  • MORNING SECTION Chemistry 9%Computers 5%Dynamics 8%Electrical Circuits10%Engineering Economics 4%Engineering Ethics 4%Fluid Mechanics 7%Materials Science7%Mathematics20%Mechanics of Materials 7%Statics10%Thermodynamics 9% Total 100%

  • AFTERNOON SECTION Civil EngineeringElectrical EngineeringMechanical EngineeringChemical Engineering Industrial EngineeringEnvironmental Engineering General

  • Electrical Engineering PE ExamMorning SectionECE Breadth ExaminationAfternoon SectionPower EngineeringComputer EngineeringElectronics, Communications and Control EngineeringSee ieeeusa.org or ncees.org

  • PE Exam FormatEach of the four modules contains forty (40) multiple-choice (ABCD) questions.All examinees must work all questions on the breadth module.All examinees must work all questions on one depth module of their choice.Thus, all examinees must work a total of eighty (80) multiple-choice (ABCD) questions.

  • FE and PE EXAM STRATEGIES Watch the timeTHINK before you startEliminate incorrect choicesAnswer all questionsPrepare for the test

  • STUDY MATERIALS FE Sample Examination Book (EE)FE Exam Supplied Reference BookPE Sample Examination BookNCEESP.O. Box 1686Clemson, SC 29633-1686Phone:(800) 250-3196Fax:(803) 654-6033Internet:www.ncees.org

  • FREQUENT QUESTIONS Can I transfer my EIT Registration?Will graduate school count for the 4 years experience requirement?What score is required to pass the test?If I fail, can I take the test again?How can I contact the registration board in my state when Im ready for the PE exam?

  • What is an accredited degree?Most colleges or universities that award an engineering degree are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. If you do not have a degree accredited by EAC/ABET additional experience requirements may apply.

  • After qualifying, am I licensed as a P.E. in Electrical Engineering?In some states, yes.In other states, you are licensed as a P.E. without any other designation, however, you can practice only in your field of expertise gained by education or experience.

  • Can I become licensed nationally?No. Just as with other professions, the requirements for licensure are left to the states. However, most state laws are similar to the NCEES model law so usually you do not have to pass exams again and you can be licensed by comity.

  • What are the 10 reasons for becoming licensed as a P.E.?There are really more than 10 reasons but most will fall in four categories . . .1. A legal necessity.2. Improved employment security.3. Better opportunities for advancement.4. Personal satisfaction.

  • Legal Necessity1. If you ever want or need to become a consulting engineer, you must be licensed as a P.E. 2. Only a P.E. can sign and seal engineering documents that are submitted to a public authority or for public and private clients.

  • Improved Employment Security3. Restructuring, downsizing and outsourcing ARE REAL! A P.E. license may make the difference in finding new employment.4. Industry and utility exemptions are being eliminated in some jurisdictions.5. Continuing education is required for a professional engineer-- in some states by law but in all states in practice.

  • Opportunities for Advancement6. Many companies encourage licensure and some even pay a bonus for becoming a P. E.7. In education, more colleges are requiring a P.E. license for engineering faculty or for holding certain titles.8. In many industry, utility, and government positions, a P.E. is required for specified jobs or levels.

  • Opportunities for Advancement - Continued9. With the engineering profession now operating in an international environment, licensing may be required to work in or for other countries. You will be prepared in the event your career moves in this direction.

  • Personal Satisfaction10. Licensure is the mark of a professional. Ethical standards, continuing education, and professional competency are expected. P.E. after you name indicates you have met the standards and can be respected as a professional.

  • ... And One More Reason

  • The future . . . Are you ready? Having a P.E. license is the best insurance policy and could affect your career. The time to start is now. Contact your state licensing board for requirements and examination dates. Licensing board addresses and phone numbers can be obtained from the Internet -- http://www.ncees.org/boards.html

  • P.E.IEEE encourages you to get it.

    Before getting into the details of professional licensing, lets answer the question What is a professional engineer? Like other professions such as medicine, law, or accounting, engineering is a profession regulated by certain laws. Thus ...Let me give you a quick overview of some of the topics I intend to discuss with you today, so we will all share the same concept of where we are going in this discussion. And please, feel free to ask questions at any time. We will discuss...In 1907, Wyoming became the first state to require professional registration for those persons who wanted to practice engineering and land surveying. Now all states and jurisdictions of the United States have registration laws governing the practice of engineering, as do many foreign countries. These laws are often both title acts and practice acts, i.e....

    Despite these legal provisions, the majority of engineers in the U.S. are not licensed. Why? ...Because in most states there are certain exemptions for industrial practice.What are the requirements to become licensed as a P.E.? While there are minor differences from state to state, generally licensing for engineers, just as in other professions, is based on education, experience, and examinations....The first four hours of the FE exam covers topics that form the basis for all disciplines of engineering....Note that engineering ethics is included in this exam, so if you are not already familiar with one of the Codes of Ethics for Engineers, you should study the ethics section furnished by NCEES.The afternoon section of the exam provides questions in each of the five largest engineering disciplines of engineering ....

    The General afternoon exam is provided for those individuals whose major is not one of these traditional disciplines, such as systems engineering, biomedical engineering, and the like. However, if your major is not one of the major five, I suggest that you look carefully at the specifications before selecting your afternoon exam. For example, aeronautical engineers might want to select mechanical and petroleum majors may want to work the chemical exam.The PE exam for electrical and computer engineering was recently changed to a breadth and depth format. All candidates work the problems in the morning four hour examination. Candidates choose to work one of the three afternoon examination modules: Power Engineering, Computer Engineering or Electronics, Communications, and Control Systems Engineering. Details about the topics in each exam can be found at the IEEE-USA web site under the L&R Committee or on the NCEES web site.The PE exam is now entirely multiple choice format. There are a total of 40 questions in the morning and 40 questions in each of the afternoon modules.Since the FE is a multiple choice exam, there are certain test-taking strategies that you should employ to help you pass the test....There are many different study guides and review manuals available to help you prepare for the FE and PE exams. Since the NCEES is the organization that prepares the tests for all jurisdictions to use, I particularly suggest that you get...Let me answer a few of the questions that I am frequently asked about professional engineering registration. Ill begin with some o the simplest ones....If you have never heard of EAC/ABET, you might first wonder if your school is accredited. You can usually find out by consulting the schools catalogue or asking a faculty person. If your school is accredited you can typically become licensed with an engineering BS degree, four years of qualifying experience after graduation and passing the FE and P&PE examinations. If your school is not accredited, it may take additional experience or, in some states, you cannot become licensed as a P.E.

    (Note: It is recommended that the presenter be prepared to answer the question about which schools are EAC/ABET accredited within the territory of interest to the audience).About a dozen of the states license engineers b

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