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Yahoo

Search Experience

Sujata Halarnkar

Fall 2008

LIBR-282-05

For the mid-term project, I reviewed the sports nutrition industry in the United States to identify current trends, major manufacturers, and distributors. For the final project, I decided to explore Indias market and its potential for distributing US sports nutrition products. In this report, I have included some background information on India, reviewed current consumer trends, and identified key information necessary to explore distribution of health products possibilities. I have also included a number of Indian manufacturers of health products.

Search Strategy

From the experience of the mid-term project, I decided to begin my search with Yahoo! Finance and Google.com. Mainly, I looked for statistics and news article on the topic. A narrow topic made it difficult to find resources. India is an emerging market in sports nutrition industry and not much literature is available on the topic. Many new health product companies are being founded and slowly information about them is coming up on the Internet. I also explored Factiva.com. However, as previously experienced I found more or less the similar results. Obviously, it is easier and quicker to search and narrow down resources in the paid databases.

I started my search with basic search terms and developed search terms from them. I noted down new and interesting search terms from news articles and reports. I found the Indian market complex and difficult to analyze. Cultural and social factors influence the Indian consumer market in many ways. Local survey or interview of consumers would have provided a better insight on the market.

Surprisingly, I found sufficient information on the Indian manufacturers and distributors of health related products. Initially, I wanted to focus on whey protein market. However, whey protein products are slowly gaining popularity in India and I could not find sufficient information on the topic.

Finally, I tried to use the latest articles for this research to find current market and consumer trends. Textbooks especially Carrs Super Searchers were useful reference tools in this search.

Listed below are my search results along with keywords I used for this search.

Keywords used

whey protein market in India

whey protein consumer market in India

market trend whey protein India

whey protein and India

sports nutrition and india

sports nutrition and india

indian sports nutrition industry and consumer trends

india and demographic

india and whey protein and market trends

consumer market and india and health nutrition trends

Challenges:

Difficulty in narrowing down resources

Sports Nutrition industry is huge and too many categories of products to cover

Many good new sources but difficult to find free market reports

Difficulty in finding free research or news articles on the topic

Yahoo!

Search term: whey protein market in india

1. Monday March 31, 05:02 PM

Mahaan Proteins Ltd. Receives the 2007 Frost & Sullivan Market Penetration Leadership Award for Indian Protein Ingredients Market

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Mumbai, Maharashtra, India, Monday, March 31, 2008 -- (Business Wire India) -- The 2007 Frost & Sullivan Market Penetration Leadership Award in the Indian Protein Ingredient Market was conferred to Mahaan Proteins Limited at a recently held "2007 Frost & Sullivan India Chemicals Materials and Foods Awards Banquet" in Mumbai. This award was in recognition of the outstanding work carried out by Mahaan towards introducing whey protein powders and concentrates in India, and gaining a significant market share in a traditionally dominated skimmed and whole milk powder industry.

According to Mamta Wadhwa, Director, Chemicals Materials and Foods Practice, Frost & Sullivan, South Asia and Middle East, "Mahaan, has led to a major breakthrough in the value-added dairy food segments in the Indian market with its complete range of whey powders and concentrates, with other companies following suit. Mahaan commands 80 percent plus market share in the Indian whey protein market. The Group has also set up Manufacturing Facilities in a 100% Excise Free Zone, meeting international standards for Contract Research and Manufacturing services (CRAMS) for the manufacturing of wide range of Nutraceuticals."

On receiving the award, Mr. R Goyal, Director, Mahaan Proteins Limited, said, "We are honoured to have received this recognition from Frost & Sullivan acknowledging the success achieved by Mahaan in the Indian Protein Ingredients market. This award is a great reiteration of the value that Mahaan brings to the market, through partnering with customers, creating innovative end-use applications, technological developments, new product applications and research studies."

The recipient of this award is evaluated on specific pre-defined criteria which include market share gain, increase in sales, and brand awareness efforts within the industry. This is accomplished through interviews with market participants, end-user studies, and extensive secondary research.

In addition to the above methodology, there are specific criteria used to determine final competitor rankings within the industry. These include competitive pricing strategies, strong sales force strategy, ability to establish brand awareness through promotional activities and advertising, strategic alliances that expand customer base and finally product innovation which also includes developing new technologies.

The protein ingredients market globally has seen accelerated growth owing to its functionalities like emulsifying, water binding, viscosity enhancing, foaming properties apart from its usual nutritional profile. The Indian Protein Ingredients Market is broadly classified into -Soya protein, Whey protein and Wheat Gluten. Frost & Sullivan's comprehensive analysis indicates that the total market for Indian protein ingredients was valued at INR 279.2 million representing market volumes of 1650 MT in the year 2006. The soya protein market contributes 72.0 percent of the total revenues generated, the whey protein market contributes 23.0 percent and the wheat gluten market contributes only 5.0 percent of the total revenues. The estimated growth rate was 5.6 percent per annum in the year 2006.

The soya and whey proteins would witness good growth in nutritional and functional applications across various end use segments including pharma formulations, tube feeding formulas, infant formulas, functional beverages and fortified foodstuffs.

About Frost and Sullivan:

Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Consulting Company, partners with clients to accelerate their growth. The company's Growth Partnership Services, Growth Consulting and Career Best Practices empower clients to create a growth focused culture that generates, evaluates and implements effective growth strategies. Frost & Sullivan employs over 45 years of experience in partnering with Global 1000 companies, emerging businesses and the investment community from more than 30 offices on six continents. For more information about Frost & Sullivan's Growth Partnerships, visit http://www.frost.com.

About Mahaan

Mahaan Proteins Ltd. is the only composite dairy ingredient plant in India that manufactures edible casein, pharmaceutical and edible grade lactose, whey protein concentrate 70% and pure ghee.

Mahaan Proteins Ltd. has been set up with foreign technical collaboration and has specialized in manufacturing dairy ingredients and is currently developing caseinates and functional WPCs.It has also added a brand new facility for spray drying specialized instantly soluble powders for its buyers engaged in the nutraceuctical industry.

http://www.mahaanfoods.com/mahaangroup.html

Media contact details

CONTACT:

Frost & Sullivan

Corporate Communications - South Asia

Remi Chatterjee

+91 22 4001 3419

fax: +91 22 2832 4713

[email protected]

or

Corporate Communications - South Asia & Middle East

Nimisha Iyer

+91 22 4001 3404

fax: +91 22 2832 4713

[email protected]

CONTACT:

Frost & Sullivan

Corporate Communications - South Asia

Remi Chatterjee

+91 22 4001 3419

fax: +91 22 2832 4713

[email protected]

or

Corporate Communications - South Asia & Middle East

Nimisha Iyer

+91 22 4001 3404

fax: +91 22 2832 4713

[email protected]

2.

Dixon HEALTHCARE PVT. LTD. offers a wide range of health products full of nutritional and vital compositions for healthy and productive life....

About Us

A healthy and well balanced diet is the essence of living in an age where people are moving ahead at a jet speed. It has become very much imperative to include vital nutrients in daily diet in order to remain healthy and energetic. As a leading brand in the concerned market, Dixon HEALTHCARE PVT. LTD. has taken the initiatives to provide you with all these vital ingredients which are a part of healthy living. We are an acclaimed manufacturer and exporter of a variety of Health Drinks, Protein Supplements, Energy Drinks, Food Supplements for Diabetics, Whey Protein Concentrates, Multi-Vitamin Powder, etc. All these products contain high level of protein, vitamins and various amino acids. The food supplements are prepared in a way that they are suitable even for the people suffering from Diabetes.

Since we are in a field where health is the main area of concern, we cross check to be sure that all our products are the best and safe in terms of quality. The rates of these products are within the budgets of middle class people. We ascertain that the related orders are always delivered on time, thereby leading to complete customer satisfaction. Being committed to keep our customers in the pink of health, Dixon HEALTHCARE PVT. LTD. gives keen attention to their feedback and suggestions, trying to incorporate the same and improve the quality of our products. The popularity of our products has given us a brand goodwill in the market with the result that we export them all across the globe.

Our Vision

With a vision to be the market leader in our arena, we, at Dixon HEALTHCARE PVT. LTD., work diligently to increase our productivity and efficiency. We are now planning to import quality raw materials from so as overseas markets to reduce the cost of our products and broaden our international prospects. Our company is solely aimed at delivering new and quality products to our customers to strengthen our image in the domestic as well as global market.

Product Range

Since its establishment in 2000, Dixon HEALTHCARE PVT. LTD. has taken the initiative to produce a wide range of products for the benefit of its customers. We are a reputed manufacturer and exporter of the following products:

* Health Drinks

* Protein Supplements

* Energy Drinks

* Food Supplements for Diabetics

* Whey Protein Concentrates

* Multi-Vitamin Powder

* Protein Supplement Syrup

* Nutritional Supplement Capsules

* Fiberplus Powder

* Pro-Nut Granules.

Quality Assurance

Quality at Dixon HEALTHCARE PVT. LTD. is of paramount importance. All our products go through stringent quality checking mechanism. We have a team of quality supervisors who sincerely check the quality and ensure that only safe and flawless quality health drinks, food supplements and other related products are manufactured. Our testing laboratories are equipped with the latest testing machines where each product is tested for quality and efficiency. The whole procedure is in complete accordance with the international standards, and this is the reason why our valued clients have always opted for our products time and again.

Infrastructure

The state of the art infrastructure is another USP of Dixon HEALTHCARE PVT. LTD. which provides us an additional edge over other competitors in the market. We have installed the latest machines at our unit to run our production process which is handled by a well managed workforce exhibiting utmost efficiency and sincerity. The employed professionals include scientists, pharmacists, and people from the field of bio-technology; who are experts in the field of protein chemistry and ensure that correct amount of ingredients are mixed in the preparation of the products. All the machines are operated in a clean and hygienic environment in order to prevent any kind of contamination in the products.

The products are packed efficiently along with the manufacturing and expiry dates being clearly mentioned on the labels so as to avoid any confusion. Our Research and Development department is lashed with all the modern equipments needed to test any new product. It has developed various kinds of research programmes to make improvisation in the service standards.

Energy Drink Nutritional Supplement Capsules Protein Supplement Syrup Whey Protein Concentrate Viprex Syrup Health Drink Multi-Vitamin Powder Pro-Nut Granules Fiberplus Powder Food Supplement for Diabetics

Contact Details

DIXON HEALTHCARE PVT. LTD.

Plot No.- 89, Dhovali Village, Taluka-Vasai,Thane - 401207, Maharashtra, India

Phone:91-250-6452995

Send Mail

Key Personnel

Ms. Ranjana Kolge (Director)

Mobile:+919820303499

Translate In : View in English View in Spanish View in French View in German View in Italian View in Chinese (Simplified) View in Japanese View in Korean View in Arabic View in Portuguese

3. Sterling Rasayan Ltd.

The activities of the company have expanded significantly over the last five years to a point where over 250 items are regularly traded on an ex-stock basis. Most of the business activities of Sterling Rasayan now consist of locally sourced products to be distributed to the ever growing customer base. Products were initially sourced from India, however, expansion of product range over the past few years has increased in number of products coming from overseas markets specially from Europe,East Europe, U.S.A, Australia & China. Today Sterling Rasayan are India's leading Indenting / Sourcing Agents for Imports & Exports.

We have a back-up of more than 50 Large Reputed Manufacturers in India & can offer you these products at most competitive rates.

Home |Services| Imports | Exports | Objectives | Contact Us

Sterling Rasayan (P) Ltd

Sterling House, 27 Old Rajinder Nagar Market

New Delhi - 110060, INDIA

Ph : +911125734286 Fax : +91112574428

Mobile : +919811038104, [email protected]

Yahoo!

Search term: whey protein consumer market in india

Similar results as whey protein market in india

Yahoo!

Search term: market trend whey protein india

1. http://www.usdec.org/files/PressReleases/2007%20%23s%20release%20(for%20dairy%20processor%20media)%200208%20-%20FINAL.pdf

Factiva.com

Search term: sports nutrition and india

1.

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Nutritionals in India

242 words

1 August 2008

MarketResearch.com

English

Copyright 2008 MarketResearch.com, All Rights Reserved.

Published By: Euromonitor International

Euromonitor International's Nutritionals in India market report offers a comprehensive guide to the size and shape of the health and wellness nutritional market at a national level. It provides the latest retail sales data (2002-2007), allowing you to identify the sectors driving growth. It identifies the leading companies, the leading brands and offers strategic analysis of key factors influencing the market - be they new product developments, packaging innovations, economic/lifestyle influences, distribution or pricing issues. Forecasts to 2012 illustrate how the market is set to change.Product coverage: Herbal/traditional products; Slimming products; Sports nutrition; Vitamins and dietary supplements

Data coverage: market sizes (historic and forecasts), company shares, brand shares and distribution data.

Why buy this report?

Get a detailed picture of the health and wellness nutritional industry;

Pinpoint growth sectors and identify factors driving change;

Understand the competitive environment, the market's major players and leading brands;

Use five-year forecasts to assess how the market is predicted to develop.

Euromonitor International has over 30 years experience of publishing market research reports, business reference books and online information systems. With offices in London, Chicago, Singapore, Shanghai, Vilnius, Dubai and Cape Town and a network of over 600 analysts worldwide, Euromonitor International has a unique capability to develop reliable information resources to help drive informed strategic planning

To Purchase Report:

http://www.marketresearch.com/feed/factiva/display.asp?productid=2016684

Vendor: Euromonitor International

Document MRKRE00020081124e481000uc

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Search term: whey protein and India

1. PLETHICO LAUNCHES A LOW FAT WHEY PROTEIN SUPPLEMENT (the product has 65 percent proteins without saturated fat and is free from cholesterol)

Modern Food Processing. Oct 31, 2008; pg 10

129 words

31 October 2008

Indian Business Insight

English

Copyright (c) 2008 Informatics (India) Ltd.

Plethico Pharmaceuticals Ltd has launched Coach's Formula (CF), a low fat whey protein supplement in India. The product has 65 percent proteins without saturated fat and is free from cholesterol. CF is recommended for people who undertake a fitness regimen and for athletes. It has been developed with inputs from international fitness instructors, nutritionists and experts from the field of sports. The protein formula contains all essential vitamins and minerals and helps in regeneration and recuperation of damaged muscle tissue. The low fat supplement increases the physical stamina, leading to better performance of sports persons.

851670|ABSTRACT|BIMONTHLY

Document WIBI000020081126e4av00077

2. Get a Deep Insight into the World Sports and Fitness Nutrition Market

6682 words

1 October 2008

07:19

Marketwire (English)

English

Copyright 2008 Marketwire All Rights Reserved.

LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM--(Marketwire - Oct. 1, 2008) - Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report related to the Health food industry is available in its catalogue.

World Sports and Fitness Nutrition Market

http://www.reportlinker.com/p092492/World-Sports-and-Fitness-Nutrition--Market.html

This report analyzes the worldwide markets for Sports and Fitness Nutrition in Millions of US$. The specific product segments analyzed are Foods and Drinks (Sports/Energy Bars, Sports/Energy Drinks, & Powders to Mix), and Supplements (Amino Acids/Derivatives, Herbal Products, Prohormones, Vitamins/Minerals, & Others). The report provides separate comprehensive analytics for the US, Canada, Japan, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and Rest of World. Annual forecasts are provided for the period of 2001 through 2015. A ten-year historic analysis is also provided for these markets with annual market analytics. The report profiles 293 companies including many key and niche players worldwide such as Abbott Nutrition, Experimental & Applied Sciences Inc., AST Sports Science, Bodyonics Ltd, Body Wise International Inc., Champion Nutrition, Clif Bar Inc, Coca-Cola Co, Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Inc., Dymatize Enterprises, Inc., GlaxoSmithKline Plc., Hansen Natural Corporation, Kraft Foods Inc., Laboratoires Physcience, Maximuscle Ltd., MuscleTech Research and Development Inc., NBTY Inc, Nestle SA, Nestle Nutrition, Nestle Waters, Optimum Nutrition Inc., Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., PepsiCo Inc., The Quaker Oats Company, Red Bull GmbH, Seven Seas Ltd., Slim-Fast Foods Company, Schiff Nutrition International, Inc., and Yakult Honsha Co., Ltd. Market data and analytics are derived from primary and secondary research. Company profiles are mostly extracted from URL research and reported select online sources.

SPORTS AND FITNESS NUTRITION MCP-1089

A GLOBAL STRATEGIC BUSINESS REPORT

Factiva.com

Search terms: whey protein and emerging markets

1.

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News

The just-food interview - Peder Tuborgh, Arla Foods.

just-food.com

1217 words

25 November 2008

Just-Food

English

2008 Aroq Limited. All rights reserved

Dairy has proved one of the food industry's more colourful sectors in recent years with volatile prices, rising production costs and the emergence of buoyant emerging markets keeping processors on their toes. Arla Foods, Europe's second-largest dairy group, has set out its stall for international growth in this ever-evolving landscape. In this month's just-food interview, Dean Best spoke with Arla CEO Peder Tuborgh to find out more about Arla's ambitions.

While the global dairy sector remains in a state of flux, one of the industry's heavyweights, Arla Foods, is looking to flex its muscles.

The only certainty in the dairy market at the moment is uncertainty. Following last year's record dairy prices, a combination of increased supply and lower consumer demand has hit prices in 2008. According to food industry analysts Rabobank, prices are expect to bounce back some time in 2009 as global demand recovers and dairy consumption in the world's emerging markets continues to grow.

However, the roller-coaster nature of dairy prices only serves to illustrate the volatility in the sector. Combine that with the spectre of increased production costs and the challenges for those that operate in the dairy sector are plain to see. Some dairy processors, like the Dutch giants Campina and Friesland Foods, have looked to join together to combat that volatility and industry watchers believes further consolidation in the sector is on the cards.

Arla, the Danish-Swedish co-operative, is not standing still. Last month, the company, Europe's second-largest dairy group, unveiled a five-year global strategy for the business. A focus on fewer markets, including those where dairy consumption has been buoyant, including China, and greater investment in product innovation are among the initiatives Arla believes will strengthen the business and improve returns for its farmer-members.

The company plans to double its investment in product innovation, while consolidating its brands into three "strong, global brands" Castello, Lurpak and a new namesake brand. Arla is also looking to double its worldwide sales of whey protein.

For Arla CEO Peder Tuborgh the programme is vital. The 45-year-old joined Arla in 2000 in the wake of the company's merger with fellow dairy group MD Foods, where he had worked since 1987.

In almost a decade at Arla, Tuborgh has seen a great deal of milestones, not least the 2003 merger of its UK business with Express Dairies. However, Tuborgh, who has been in charge of Arla since 2005, believes the five-year plan unveiled last month is a watershed moment in the company's history.

It is the most ambitious strategy, and also one of the most visionary strategies, Tuborgh tells just-food. We are now ready to look at all solutions that will strengthen the company for the benefit of our owners. We are ready to shift our current focus on brands and markets, open doors to new owners, and invest more in less brands and markets.

The maker of brands including Castello cheese, Lurpak butter and Cravendale milk sells into around 100 markets worldwide but Tuborgh believes the time is right for Arla to take stock of its global presence and divert resources to key markets. The main reason for our new and redefined focus on our international markets is a realisation that we get more out of our investments by focusing those investments on fewer markets, Tuborgh says.

Arla has earmarked three so-called seed markets for particular attention. Russia, where Arla has a fledgling cheese and butter venture, the US, where the company has a growing cheese business and China, where the group runs a venture with local dairy group Mengniu, have been identified as key to the company's international growth.

Any future Arla investments internationally will be focused on these three markets that way we can benefit more from the investments, Tuborgh says. We cannot be everything to everyone on all markets and this new strategy seeks to maximise our impact by prioritising and categorising our world map. Arla is present on approximately 100 markets worldwide, so the need to create a sharper overall focus has been evident.

One of the company's immediate areas of focus is likely to be China, where its venture was one of the dairy businesses caught up in the recent melamine-in-milk contamination scandal. Arla's Chinese partner Mengniu was named as one of the dairies at the centre of the melamine outbreak, which saw at least four babies die and thousands become ill after consuming milk powder contaminated with the industrial chemical melamine. The scandal rocked China's buoyant dairy sector, which has enjoyed rising milk consumption and attracted growing interest from multinational investors. The worry is just how China's growing love for dairy will be affected by the scandal. Tuborgh, however, is cautiously optimistic about the future of one of the markets central to Arla's international ambitions.

Regaining consumer confidence is without doubt the absolute number one priority for us in China right now. And we believe it will happen our expectations are to return to normal sales levels by the end of 2009, Tuborgh insists. Our advantage is that we offer products which have been through an extensive testing for melamine, which means we can offer the consumers products that are safe to consume. That being said, the development of the market in China has been set back by the unfortunate incidents this year. Over the long term, we do not doubt that dairy production has great prospects in China in the future.

Tuborgh also sees opportunities closer to home. Under Arla's review, Germany and Poland have joined the company's core markets of Finland, Denmark, Sweden and the UK. Tuborgh keeps his cards close to his chest but the signs are that Arla will take an active role in the widely-expected consolidation in the European dairy sector.

Although we cannot mention any specific names of potential partners at this point, we can say that Arla is currently searching the market for potential partners with whom we can either set up some sort of collaboration with regard to local production and distribution or possibly buy other companies, Tuborgh reveals. Arla expects to play an active role in the consolidation of the dairy sector in Northern Europe in the next five years. At this point, we cannot get more specific about the nature of possible alliances, but we have identified both Germany and Poland as two new core markets for our business.

Milk production is set to rise significantly, Tuborgh says, and he sees it as vital that Arla is ready to pounce should opportunities for acquisitions or alliances arise.

We foresee a significant increase in milk production across this Northern European region, and our response to this must be to take part in that actively through consolidation. Growth is essential to success on the international dairy market today, and Arla simply cannot sit back and watch passively as new opportunities present themselves, Tuborgh insists.

More to come...

This article was originally published on just-food.com on 25 November 2008. For authoritative and timely food business information visit http://www.just-food.com.

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2. New Developments in Global Consumer Trends

FURTHER INFORMATION

Product Type: Report

Published: 16 Apr 2007

Available Format(s): PDF

Table of contents

Product Brochure

Published by: Datamonitor

Price: $7995

Introduction

This report based on a vast array of primary and secondary research provides a comprehensive snapshot of global consumer behavior. Structured around Datamonitor's well-established mega-trends framework, it offers added clarity, new detailed insight, future trend predictions and intuitive recommendations for marketing and product development.

Scope

* Detailed insight and analysis covering each of the 10 mega-trends with a separate Action Points chapter outlining product development opportunities

* Extensive primary research profiling how the consumer attitudes and behaviors influencing the mega-trends have evolved and will continue to evolve

* All new trend prediction and implications sections offering futuristic perspectives on every major trend shaping global consumption patterns

* Showcases the latest best-practice, "on-trend" product and marketing innovation offering a wealth of creative ideas to guide future innovation

Highlights

Industry executives surveyed globally believe that health is the most important mega-trend influencing their business today. Changes in consumer values and behavior have been profound; 76% of European and US citizens overall are "conscious of health and wellness issues on a daily basis". Going forward, the trend will only increase in significance.

Consumer preferences are often counter-intuitive leading to a scenario of trends and counter trends. On one level, shoppers are more experimental and value customized choice. But 'choice paralysis' means consumers are simplifying shopping by downsizing the subset of brands in their 'consideration set' of product choices.

Ethical consumerism will continue to migrate away from a small minority of consumers towards the mainstream. Consumers will increasingly expect brands to show they are responsible in the public domain whether contributing to the local community, divulging the means of sourcing, or offering a responsible consumer buying choice.

Why you should buy this report

* Increase the likelihood of being "on-trend" by learning how the mega-trends have affected behaviors and how they are likely to evolve.

* Access a wealth of market, behavioral and attitudinal time-series data that can be used to guide your future marketing plans.

* Save time and gain maximal insight by using this 'one-stop-shop' resource which offers a clear and up-to-date framework for understanding consumers.

3. The Burgeoning Middle Classes in Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC)

FURTHER INFORMATION

Product Type: Brief

Published: 13 Apr 2007

Available Format(s): PDF

Table of contents

Product Brochure

Published by: Datamonitor

Price: $1695

Introduction

All of the BRIC markets have great potential for overcoming their past economic underperformance and establishing the most stabilizing of forces a prosperous middle class. This group in each country is growing at varying rates but the future direction is clear: the middle class will both broaden and deepen providing a solid base for the development of a strong consumer packaged goods industry.

Scope

* In-depth quantitative data covering historical and forecast demographic trends in Brazil, Russia, India and China.

* Covers population size and growth overall, by age and gender, and incidence of key age-related health conditions.

* Qualitative analysis of these key population trends.

* Actionable recommendations for producers and marketers seeking to leverage opportunities within those markets.

Highlights

Since the late 1990s, Russia's economy has benefited from the twin factors of economic structural reforms and high global commodity prices of oil. These have boosted consumer confidence as individuals are more confident of their current situation and their ability to plan their future expenditure, especially in the middle class.

India's overall GDP is reasonably strong but this is mainly due to the vast population of the country. On a per capita basis it lags behind the other BRIC countries. In 2005 the par capita GDP of China was almost double that of India with Brazil and Russia some distance ahead.

Home ownership in Brazil is higher than in the US and is growing steadily, whereas in all other BRIC countries the rate of occupant ownership is in decline. The average home price in Brazil is the highest in all of the BRIC countries but the gap is being closed by China which should almost reach parity by 2010.

Why you should buy this report

* Gain access to detailed data and forecasts to inform your decision-making

* Understand the economic trends and shifting consumer motivations in the BRIC countries

* Improve your marketing by following best-practice guidelines enabling more effective targeting with on-trend products and relevant communications

If you would like more details on this research report, fill in your details below and one of our

4. The Aging of BRIC populations

FURTHER INFORMATION

Product Type: Brief

Published: 30 Apr 2007

Available Format(s): PDF

Table of contents

Product Brochure

Published by: Datamonitor

Price: $1695

Introduction

Markets such as Brazil, China, India and Russia (BRIC) should be seen within the context of a transitional period, moving in the direction of developed markets and experiencing a marked aging of their populations in coming years. This will emphasize the need to respond to a reshaping of consumer demand to accommodate the differing needs of an older populace.

Scope

* In-depth quantitative data covering historical and forecast demographic trends in Brazil, Russia, India and China.

* Covers population size and growth overall, by age and gender, and incidence of key age-related health conditions.

* Qualitative analysis of these key population trends.

* Actionable recommendations for producers and marketers seeking to leverage opportunities within those markets.

Highlights

A divide exists between Western markets and those of the less developed world, where the demographic center of gravity tends to be skewed towards youth. However, Brazil, China, India and Russia should be seen within a transitional context, driven by their economic growth and varying degrees of proximity to the Western consumer model.

Adoption of branding, marketing or strategies that fit with the historical value placed on seniors in certain countries and cultures, particularly China and India, offers a smart way to leverage market position in the context of aging populations. Extended families and a deep-seated societal respect for older citizens remain important factors.

Brand loyalty is decreasing across all age groups. This has been a general trend in developed markets for the past few decades that the BRIC countries are set to emulate. A shift towards higher average ages means that a change in marketers' priorities and message away from a focus on younger consumers is necessary to retain competitiveness.

Why you should buy this report

* Gain access to detailed data and forecasts to inform your decision-making

* Understand the population trends and shifting consumer motivations in the BRIC countries

* Improve your marketing by following best-practice guidelines enabling more effective targeting with on-trend products and relevant communications

5. New Developments in Global

Consumer Trends

The definitive trend guide to modern consumer

lifestyles and behavior

Introduction

This report based on a vast array of primary and secondary research

provides a comprehensive snapshot of global consumer behavior. Structured

around Datamonitors well-established mega-trends framework, it offers added

clarity, new detailed insight, future trend predictions and intuitive

recommendations for marketing and product development.

Over the next ten years there will be continual developments with regard to the mega-trends

because trend cycles are emerging more rapidly as a result of technology, accelerated social

diffusion, instantaneous communication and a growing willingness to accept or inability to

escape new ideas. Only by understanding these new interpretations of the mega-trends can

companies remain on-trend in the long-term and actually save time by gaining a broad clear

perspective of the macro-factors influencing sales today.

Key findings and highlights

Industry executives surveyed globally believe that health is the most important mega-trend

influencing their business today. Changes in consumer values and behavior have been

profound; 76 per cent of European and US citizens overall are "conscious of health and

wellness issues on a daily basis". Going forward, the trend will only increase in significance.

Consumer preferences are often counter-intuitive leading to a scenario of trends and

counter trends. On one level, shoppers are more experimental and value customized

choice. But 'choice paralysis' means consumers are simplifying shopping by downsizing the

subset of brands in their 'consideration set' of product choices.

Ethical consumerism will continue to migrate away from a small minority of consumers

towards the mainstream. Consumers will increasingly expect brands to show they are

responsible in the public domain whether contributing to the local community, divulging the

means of sourcing, or offering a responsible consumer buying choice.

Reasons to buy

Increase the likelihood of being "on-trend" by learning how the mega-trends have affected

behaviors and how they are likely to evolve

Access a wealth of market, behavioral and attitudinal time-series data that can be used to

guide your future marketing plans

Save time and gain maximum insight by using this 'one-stop-shop' resource which offers a

clear and up-to-date framework for understanding consumers

www.datamonitor.com/consumer

Sample pages from the report

The Future Decoded

New Developments in Global Consumer Trends DMCM2468

Datamonitor (Published 04/2007) Page 35

This report is a licensed product and is not to be photocopied

Figure 3: Industry executives globally believe that health is the most

important mega-trend influencing NPD and marketing

2

2.2

2.4

2.6

2.8

3

3.2

Health

Convenience

Sensory

Income Complexity

Age Complexity

Comfort

Lifestage Complexity

Individualism

Connectivity

Gender Complexity

Response average

Please indicate how important each mega-trend is in shaping your

marketing and product development strategy

Scale: 1= Unimportant, 4 =Very Important

9%

20%

30%

41%

0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%

40%

45%

Unimportant Somewhat important Important Very important

% of industry respondents

Please indicate how important each mega-trend is in shaping your

marketing and product development strategy: Health

Source: Datamonitor Global Industry Opinion Survey, 2006 D A T A M O N I T O R

The Future Decoded

New Developments in Global Consumer Trends DMCM2468

Datamonitor (Published 04/2007) Page 151

This report is a licensed product and is not to be photocopied

Figure 65: Compact living is often necessary among singles

Source: Datamonitor analysis D A T A M O N I T O R

Figure 66: Compact living is accentuated by the negative correlation

between property size and the average number of people per

dwelling

Australia

Brazil

China

France

Germany

India

Indonesia Iran

Italy

Mexico

Poland

Korea

Russia

Saudi Arabia

South Africa

Spain

Thailand

Ukraine

UK

United States

40

90

140

190

240

2 3 4 5 6 7

Average number of people per dwelling, 2005

Average size of dwelling (square meters), 2005

CAGR

Average

CAGR

Average

Source: Datamonitor analysis D A T A M O N I T O R

The Future Decoded

New Developments in Global Consumer Trends DMCM2468

Datamonitor (Published 04/2007) Page 167

This report is a licensed product and is not to be photocopied

The authenticity trend is, in part, rooted in the desire for quality

An increasingly affluent consumer base is becoming more educated about the quality

and variety of consumer goods available, making them more critical of the quality of

goods on retailers shelves. Consequently, there is a growing consumer perception

that mass-market food, drinks and personal care products, typically purchased in

chain retailers, are bland and lacking hedonic benefits. Therefore, being perceived as

the real thing or genuine is increasingly important. Figure 73 summarizes the

social and consumer dynamics driving the authenticity trend.

Figure 73: The search for authenticity reflects consumers active pursuit

for higher quality experiences from consumption

Authenticity is a concept built on 6 core

attributes relating to hedonic benefits and

heritage

Authenticity is cultural backlash

against modern world realities

Consumers are seeking to reconnect with the real: a desire for a timeout

and a greater interest in the values steeped in tradition

Seeking artisinal, handcrafted specialty products

e.g. growing hand-made, hand-fried, limited edition

Seeking more detailed, regional sensory profiles e.g.

e.g. Catalan wine not Spanish; Oxacan not Mexican; Hunan not Chinese

Seeking origin specific goods

e.g. single origin chocolates and locally sourced ingredients

Choosing heritage brands

e.g. buying into story-based heritage brands

Expanding connoisseurship

authenticity is also about growing connoisseurial knowledge and preferences

Greater willingness-to-pay (WTP) price premiums

knowing that premiums justify the added nuances in product design

Source: Datamonitor analysis D A T A M O N I T O R

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New Developments in Global Consumer Trends

DMCM2468

Daniel Bone, New Developments in Global Consumer Trends

...

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Search term: india and demographic

1. India economy: Demographic profile

829 words

20 August 2008

Economist Intelligence Unit - ViewsWire

ViewsWire

18

English

(C) 2008 The Economist Intelligence Unit Ltd.

COUNTRY BRIEFING

FROM THE ECONOMIST INTELLIGENCE UNIT

Demographic profile

2002 2007 2012

Population (m)

Total 1,034.2 1,110.4 1,187.0

Male 534.1 572.1 610.0

Female 500.1 538.3 576.9

Age profile (% of total population)

0-14 33.5 32.4 30.8

15-64 62.5 64.2 66.3

65+ 4.6 5.2 5.9

Young-age dependency ratio 0.54 0.50 0.47

Old-age dependency ratio 0.07 0.08 0.09

Working-age population (m) 645.9 713.0 786.5

Urbanisation (% of total) 28.1 29.3 30.7

Labour force (m) 470.2 516.4 570.1

Period averages 2003-07 2008-12

Population growth (%) 1.4 1.3

Working-age population growth (%) 2.0 2.0

Labour force growth (%) 1.9 2.0

Crude birth rate (per 1,000) 23.6 21.4

Crude death rate (per 1,000) 7.0 6.1

Infant mortality rate (per 1,000 live

births) 39.8 28.2

Life expectancy at birth (years)

Male 65.0 68.0

Female 69.6 73.3

Average 67.2 70.5

Sources: International Labour Organisation

(ILO), labour force projections; Economist Intelligence Unit estimates and

forecasts; national statistics.

India will become the most populous country within the next 30 years

Although the population growth rate is gradually falling, the past failure of family planning policy means that India is expected to overtake China as the world's most populous country in the early 2030s, with a population approaching 1.5bn. Governments have shifted away from sterilisation as the cornerstone of family planning to an emphasis on improving female social and economic welfare. This, coupled with rising living standards, particularly in urban areas, is leading to a fall in the population growth rate. Nonetheless, although strong economic growth is slowing the fertility rate, at 3.1 children per woman, it is one-third above the official target of replacement-level fertility.

The rising population will lead to opportunities and costs. Increased environmental degradation and a growing strain on water and food resources appear inevitable. By 2012 the proportion of the population in the 0-14 age group is expected to fall to around 30%, with potentially beneficial implications for the education system. The proportion of the population over 65 is projected to rise slightly, but in the absence of a national pension system this does not have the worrying implications for pension liabilities that more highly developed countries face.

Better education will be vital if India is to realise its potential

India will, however, enjoy a growing working-age population at a time when other countries (including China) will face increasing dependency ratios. If India can put in place an education system that ensures its working-age population meets global demands, then it will perform well, probably through a combination of production shifting to India, and from Indian workers migrating to meet the needs of other countries. If its education system fails to adapt, however, a large underemployed population is likely to result in increased social instability.

The gender distribution of India's population is disturbing and has equally important implications for stability. According to the 2001 census, for every 1,000 boys under the age of six, there were only 927 girls. In the worst-affected states, this figure fell below 800. Child mortality rates are higher for girls than boys, and foeticide (aborting a foetus identified as female) is becoming more common as technology enabling elective abortions spreadsdespite the fact that these procedures, along with sex-determination tests, are illegal. Historically, countries with severe gender disparities suffer from rising disorder.

Job creation in the rural economy could stem rural-urban migration

Rates of rural underemployment and urban unemployment are high, and India's lack of a well-developed industrial base has hindered employment generation. The government is pinning its hopes on the expansion of the manufacturing sector to increase employment opportunities, but employment growth in the sector will not keep up with the expansion in the labour force. Migration into towns and cities from the countryside is also creating employment stress. India's urban population is expected to rise from just over one-quarter of the total population in the mid-1990s to over one-third by 2010. This will put pressure on the infrastructure of cities, which in most cases is unable to support even current population levels. The supply of transport, water, power and housing in many urban areas is thus likely to be stretched further, and levels of pollution and crime may rise. The need to improve opportunities in rural areas to deter migration and to stimulate the rural economy has been recognised by policymakers, but progress has been slow. The current government has made this its first priority, but achieving quick results will be difficult.

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Cognis Expands Ops in India

02/01/2008

MONHEIM, Germany Cognis opened a liaison office in Mumbai, India, aiming to strengthen relationships with existing customers and initiate new business opportunities. According to the company, it has seen significant growth in India in the last few years, focusing on supplying specialty chemicals and other ingredients for the wellness and sustainability markets. Cognis already has a strong network of distributors in India covering almost all market segments of its product portfolio.

The liaison office will consolidate Cognis activities and expertise in India, while strengthening local ties and analyzing market trends on the ground. It will represent all three of Cognis strategic business unitsCare Chemicals, Nutrition & Health, and Functional Products. Sales activities will continue to be carried out by local distributors.

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2. Recent Trends in Development of Fermented Milks

H. K. Khurana1 and S. K. Kanawjia2*

1Science and Technology Entrepreneurs Park, Thapar Institute of Engineering and Technology, Patiala 147004,

Punjab, India, 2Dairy Technology Division, National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal - 132001, Haryana, India

Abstract: Ever-growing consumer demand for convenience, combined with a healthy diet and preference for natural

ingredients has led to a growth in functional beverage markets. Current trends and changing consumer needs indicate a

great opportunity for innovations and developments in fermented milks. Scientific and clinical evidence is also mounting

to corroborate the consumer perception of health from fermented milks. Probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics and associated

ingredients also add an attractive dimension to cultured dairy products. Also, owing to expanding market share and size of

dairy companies, there has been a reduction of clearly structured markets i.e. merging of dairy products and fruit beverage

markets with introduction of juiceceuticals like fruit-yogurt beverages that are typical example of hybrid dairy products

offering health, flavour and convenience. Another potential growth area for fermented milks includes added-value

products such as low calorie, reduced-fat varieties and those fortified with physiologically active ingredients including

fibers, phytosterols, omega-3-fatty acids, whey based ingredients, antioxidant vitamins, isoflavones that provide specific

health benefits beyond basic nutrition. World over efforts have been devoted to develop fermented milks containing

certain nonconventional food sources like soybeans and millets and convert them to more acceptable and palatable form

thus producing low cost, nutritious fermented foods especially for developing and underdeveloped nations where

malnutrition exists. Furthermore, use of biopreservatives and certain innovative technologies like membrane processing,

high pressure processing and carbonation lead to milk fermentation under predictable, controllable and precise conditions

to yield hygienic fermented milks of high nutritive value.

Keywords: Recent trends, fermented milks, yoghurt, probiotics, health benefits, biopreservatives.

CONSUMPTION PATTERNS

According to a study by global market analyst Euromonitor

international global sales of dairy products reached

211.5 billion [14]. The manufacture of cultured dairy

products represents the second most important fermentation

industry (after the production of alcoholic drinks) [1]. A

dynamic category, fermented dairy drinks were reported to

grow at six times the rate of total dairy growth between 1998

and 2003 in value terms. Also, probiotic drinking yoghurt

was the fastest growing dairy product sector between 1998

and 2003, followed by soy milk, (spoonable) probiotic

yoghurt, flavoured milk drinks with juice and fermented

dairy drinks [15].

The increasing demand from consumers for dairy

products with 'functional' properties is a key factor driving

value sales growth in developed markets. This led to the

promotion of added-value products such as probiotic and

other functional yoghurts, reduced-fat and enriched milk

products and fermented dairy drinks and organic cheese [14].

Another important global trend is the increasing demand for

consumer convenience. Present day consumers prefer foods

that promote good health and prevent disease. Furthermore,

these foods must fit into current lifestyles providing

convenience of use, good flavor, and an acceptable pricevalue

ratio. Such foods constitute current and future waves in

the evolution of the food development cycle [16]. There are

several principal reasons for the success of fermented dairy

products, which relate to nutrition and health, versatility and

marketing. Scientific and clinical evidence is also mounting

to corroborate the consumer perception of health from

fermented milks [15].

The consumption of milk drinks and fermented products

has been recently reviewed by the International Dairy

Federation, shown briefly in Table 2 [17]. It is quite clear

from the data that the consumption of fermented milks has

generally increased around the globe over a period from

2001 to 2004. According to another report by Euromonitor

[14] largest fermented dairy market till 2003 was Japan,

where the leading brand Yakult is the reference product for

the entire category, having been available in Japan for more

than 50 years. The next most significant markets are South

Korea and Brazil, followed by a number of Western

European markets including US probiotic drinking yoghurts,

booming on the basis of their portability, snack appeal and

health claims which match those of fermented dairy drinks;

offering improvement to digestive health and a boost to the

immune system. In fact, Western Europe has increased in

importance, becoming the second largest region for

fermented dairy drinks ahead of Latin America. In 2002

Danones Actimel, the second largest brand globally, became

the first fermented dairy drink to be launched in the US [15].

In the Indian subcontinent also, fermented milk products

such as dahi (curd), Lassi (sweetened yoghurt drink like

product)/chhach (buttermilk) and shrikhand (drained curd

added with sugar and flavoring) figure prominently in

peoples diet. The demand for fermented milk products is

increasing and it has been estimated that about 10% of total

milk produced in India is used for preparation of traditional

fermented milk products. Dahi is an age-old indigenous

Fig. (1). The Family Tree of Fermented Milk Types [7].

fermented milk of India and has managed its popularity in

Indian diet despite changing lifestyles and food habits.

About 6.9% of total milk produced in India is utilized for

making dahi intended for direct consumption. The volume of

curd and curd products was reported to be 6.0 million tones

with a market value of 120 billion rupees [10].

PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES AND

CONCLUSION AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVE

It is evident that the market for fermented milks is

booming specially probiotics and those with special added

ingredients. Modern consumers are increasingly interested in

their personal health, and expect the food that they eat to be

healthy or even capable of preventing illness. Producers and

marketers of cultured milks are making every effort to keep

them growing through product development and packaging

innovations while delivering a good for you flavorful

products suited for all occasions of gastronomic indulgence.

A major consideration in the continued development and

success of ever growing fermented milk market is

communication. This is linked to other important factors

such as development of supporting scientific documentation;

a health claims strategy and successful presentation.

Over the past century, voluminous scientific knowledge

has been well established regarding the technological aspects

of fermented milks, including the physiology of starter

cultures and related probiotic microflora. However, over the

coming years the possible research areas may include the

following aspects:

Special emphasis on research in arena of starters and

their functionality is required; specially in view of

natural biodiversity that still exists in food grade

microorganisms as starter cultures are the heart of

fermented milk industry. It is also very important to

preserve this pool for future application. Thus, it is

necessary to have better understanding of enzymic

pathways in these starters in order to be able to select

strains with specific, desired characteristics.

Appropriate international definition(s) of yoghurt and

other fermented milks including other probiotic products

are required.

More emphasis is required to get a clear understanding

of relationship between food, intestinal bacteria, human

health and disease in the field of probiotics along with

properly designed clinical studies to establish the proper

health benefits to humans. Many a times in vitro results

cannot be found in vivo, and observations reported in

animals cannot be translated directly to humans; there

are problems in generalizing the results given types of

microorganisms used thus more number of clinical

studies should be conducted on humans of different

races in different countries to properly substantiate the

health benefits to humans in general.

Newer molecular research tools, better process formulation

technologies for enhanced probiotic stability and

functionality along with biosafety evaluation of

probiotics used for human consumption are other major

thrust areas. New product categories, and thus novel and

more difficult raw materials with regard to technology

of probiotics, will certainly be the key research and

development area for future functional food markets.

There are now products with complete supplementation

offered as medical foods, as well as healthy products for

people who have problems obtaining all the nutrients they

need. It is clear from the literature that new kinds of

fermented milks containing various nutrients are being tested

as curatives for specific diseases and are approaching

medical food effectiveness in conventional food format and

will continue to be introduced to the food supply. The

occurrence of diet-related diseases of deficiency and excess,

points to the importance of the development of functional

foods (science). Functional food science must be viewed

world over beyond the short-term commercial prospects and

should be considered for long-term research and

development.

REFERENCES

[1] Anon. Its a tiny world (online). Food Today 2003; 16: 3. European

Food information council online. http://www.eufic.org/gb/food/pag/

food16/food163.htm.

[2] Beena AK. Healthbenefits of fermented milks. In:

Yahoo!

Search terms: consumer market and india and health nutrition trends

4. Country Case Study: India

The Functional Foods Sector in India

Indias traditional and regional foods have been documented throughout the

ages as containing healthy properties, beyond just their nutritional value. Such

historically functional foods include herbal extracts, fortified foods, spices,

pulses (lentils), and vegetables and fruits.

The proven special health properties of functional foods have treated

common ailments for centuries. New research is showing that many of these

foods have preventive properties as well. The Central Food Technological

Research Institute (CFTRI) in Mysore is documenting this history as well as

newer trends in functional foods through its Knowledge Digital Library

(Central Food Technological Research Institute 2005). This effort will support

a better understanding of the functional attributes of these foods while

protecting the intellectual property rights of those who develop new types of

foods through R&D.

Functional foods R&D in India is rapidly expanding and includes, among other

products, nutraceuticals, prebiotics and probiotics, and newer additives, which

are known to prevent certain diseases or other maladies. New research shows

that many of the traditional Indian foods have characteristics of functional

foods and underscores the fact that the Indians have been consuming

functional foods for centuries.

With this new recognition of functional foods comes new opportunities for

producers to mislabel and overstate the efficacy of their products, requiring

that special attention be paid to the regulatory aspects, particularly as the laws

on functional foods require updating.

Functional Food Trends

As in China, Indias health foods history dates back centuries. The

developments over the last few decades now recognize the value of traditional

medicines and naturally health-enhancing foods. With its strong tradition of

healthful eating, India ranks among the top 10 nations in buying functional

foods (Watson 2006). Indias food industry is generating $6.8 billion in annual

revenue, and this is expected to nearly double in the next five years (Ismail

2006).5

The government is working to help India become a major force in the

international functional foods market by updating its intellectual property

laws and increasing investment in R&D infrastructure (Ismail 2006). There

is unanimity among major companies, and in government, where both

ministers and the substantial state research organizations are behind the idea

of India becoming a major force in the international health foods market

Health Enhancing Foods

19

Agricultural and Rural Development

20

(Shrimpton 2004). In addition, there is little resistance from consumers to buy

functional foods.

In 1950, the Indian government established CFTRI, which has grown to be one

of the worlds largest food research institutes and one that is actively involved

in teaching (Shrimpton 2004). Furthermore, according to sources interviewed,

of the more than 200 research institutes and laboratories in India, 25 percent

are involved in food research. With such substantial scientific support, the

Indian food industry has the possibility to become a significant player in the

international market supplying high-quality functional foods.

According to Dr. S. R. Rao at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research

(CSIR), New Delhi, the thrust of publicly funded research in functional foods

has been on developing fortified foods,6 because this research reflects the

governments concern with malnutrition. According to Dr. Rajesh Kapur,

director of the Department of Biotechnology, approximately 60 percent of

children below 14 years of age are malnourished (Kapur 2006). Thus, the

government has launched the national nutrition mission with the objective of

providing ready-to-eat precooked food at a low cost and midday meals to

students at government schools.

Dr. S. R. Rao noted that basically there are three countrywide governmentsponsored

distribution channels for general nutrition-enhancing functional

foods, namely the following:

Public Distribution System (PDS): A system of government-licensed shops

where grains, sugar, and kerosene oil are subsidized and priced according

to each familys monthly entitlement.

Midday Meal Scheme: A government-funded program under which

precooked meals are provided to children at government schools

throughout the country (the national nutrition mission referred to above).

Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) Scheme: A program

conceived in 1975 aimed at improving the nutritional and health status

of vulnerable groups (for example, preschool children, pregnant women,

and nursing mothers) by providing a package of services including

supplementary nutrition, preschool education, immunization, health

checkups, referral services, and nutrition and health education.

On consumer behavior, Dr. Kapur said that there is very little awareness of

functional foods among general consumers even though these foods have

always been part of the Indian diet. This opinion is supported by research

analysts whose report states that awareness of the term fortified foods

among Indian consumers is low, but there is a high awareness of certain

brands, especially in the case of iodized salt. According to the report, although

many people may be eating fortified foods without being aware of it,

approximately 30 percent of people in Indias cities regularly consume

fortified foods.7 India has been quite progressive in its fortification programs

as an early adopter, and often initiator, of many processes.8

The government is expected to continue to actively press for the development

of the functional foods industry. According to a representative of the Ministry

Health Enhancing Foods

21

of Food Processing Industries, the ministrys mandate is to develop and

promote the food processing sector, including functional foods, throughout

the country. It conducts seminars, workshops, and training programs and has

a financing scheme that provides grants-in-aid to the food processing

companies that want their manufacturing or processing units certified for

international safety standards, such as Hazard Analysis and Critical Control

Points (HACCP) and the International Organization of Standardization (ISO).

In a speech at Foodworld India 2005, Mr. D. P. Singh, secretary, Ministry

of Food Processing Industries, introduced Vision 2015, which aims to triple

the size of the food sector in 10 years time by increasing the level of processing

of perishable goods from 6 percent to 20 percent, value added products from

20 percent to 35 percent, and share in global trade from 1.6 percent to

3 percent. Such efforts would require making processed foods affordable

domestically and competitive globally; this effort would include functional

foods. An investment of approximately US$25.5 billion is envisioned in the

next 10 years.

In addition to the substantial government support, the functional foods

industry is thriving in the private sector. According to the Frost and Sullivan

marketing study, the large food manufacturers understand their consumers

in both the mass market and the value added market. With many people

suffering from deficiencies of iron, iodine, and vitamin A, the consumer can

buy many fortified foods, such as wheat flour, iodized salt, calcium, and

vitamin-enriched jams and soft drinks. To address vitamin Adeficiency, which

is prevalent in much of rural India, food companies have introduced specific

products at affordable prices. For the middle-class consumer, companies have

launched such products as low-sodium salt, which is beneficial to patients

with high blood pressure (NutraIngredients.com 2006).

Although China is seen as the major competitor, Indian research technology in

areas like fermentation processes, plant extraction, and chemical synthesis are

more developed than their Chinese counterparts, and they still benefit from

the labor cost savings that make outsourcing to India so attractive (Ismail

2006). Some people among those involved with functional foods development

believe that Ayurvedic medicine and philosophy, based on knowledge

accumulated over 4,000 years, offers India several advantages. It is also

recognized that for these products to be successfully exported, however, the

herbs that form their basis must be standardized, or at least their potency must

be measurable. Traditionally, this is not in accordance with Ayurvedic

philosophy, which recognizes the benefits of variation between growing

conditions and individuals. Currently, there is no regulation concerning

Ayurvedic-based products (Shrimpton 2004).

Recognizing the favorable government support combined with the researchfriendly

environment and available qualified human resources, European and

U.S. multinational firms are already located in India, including Herbalife,

DuPont, GlaxoSmith Kline, Akzo Nobel Chemicals, Hindustan Lever, Heinz,

Novartis, and Roche. There are also a growing number of Indian companies

that are working internationally, such as the Associated Capsules Group

Functional Food Constraints and Opportunities in the Indian

Market

The market environment for functional foods in India, while cooperative and

relatively advanced, faces the following constraints and opportunities:

Low income of vast majority of the population. For the domestic market to

reach its full potential, income levels for the vast majority of the population

will have to rise. Although disposable income has increased over the years

and is expected to continue to do so (see the section Functional Food

Trends), it is still very low and likely to remain so for many years.

Various creative solutions by private industry have been used to overcome the

problem of people having a very small daily disposable income. Some

Health Enhancing Foods

25

Box 5. India: Complexity of Licensing

An individual planning to manufacture, distribute, stock, and/or sell food in Delhi

must approach the relevant department in the Government of National Capital

Territory of Delhi to obtain the appropriate licenses. If the process involves

irradiated food, permission is required from the Department of Atomic Energy. For

genetically modified foods, permission is required from the designated authority

in the Ministry of Environment and Forest.

Although a small state like Delhi has only one licensing authority, larger states may

have several such authorities. For example, the western state of Gujarat, is divided

into different areas, each with its separate licensing authority. Food units in areas

where there are no licensing authorities apply to their respective local health

authorities of the Food and Drug Control Administration, which have offices in

almost all districts.

Because each licensing authority has different requirements (and this report cannot

list them all), the following is an example of the procedure for obtaining a license

in Gujarat per Rule 5 of the Gujarat Prevention of Food Adulteration Rules, 1955.

The applicant must submit in full detail the following: application form;

two photographs of owner or Partners or Director or nominee; block plan

with three signed copies with measurements; list of food articles along with

approximate daily production, sales and stock with two signed copies;

proof of ownership of place of manufacture or selling; partnership deed or

memorandum of article of the company with complete address of partners

or directors; list of machinery and details of the processing of the food; and

copies of the labels along with brands used.

According to sources, approvals or licenses are granted within 30 days and even

less if the company or the brand is considered reputable. However, for companies

that plan to sell their foods nationwide, they need to obtain a separate license in

each state where they plan to sell. Imported products are required to seek approval

from the Ministry of Health.

Source: Gujarat Prevention of Food Adulteration Rules 1955; PFA 2005; authors.

manufacturers are packaging their goods in single-use packages because this

reduces the cash outlay and may result in more frequent purchases. For

example, there are a number of supplements sold in the form of single-serve

herbal tonics, but they are priced between $0.15 and $0.25 per serving. Even

with this approach, single-serving prices generally are still out of the reach of

the poorer consumers for use on a daily basis (Ismail 2006).

Another marketing strategy is to sell products in less-processed forms,

thereby reducing the cost of the product. For example, in situations in

which even the single serving is too expensive for low-income consumers,

companies sell the supplements in powdered forms, which is not the

normal means of sale. With Indias exceptionally large population, a

reduced price does not necessarily mean reduced company returns; instead

it could mean significantly more volume by targeting a much larger base

(Ismail 2006).

Existence of unscrupulous manufacturers. Although the problem is not as

damaging as in China, there are unscrupulous manufacturers that are

producing pirated functional food products and making false claims about

their products. Such activities affect the reputation of the industry and can be

especially damaging to companies in the export market. Pirate products are

less effective than the genuine product and can cause serious harm and may

even lead to fatalities. Producers of supplements and Ayurvedic medicines are

particularly vulnerable. At present, GMP in the functional foods industry are

voluntary (Starling 2004).

Lack of testing infrastructure to validate manufacturers claims. There are

limited laboratories to validate the functional or therapeutic claims of functional

foods. Many of the current laboratories require additional investment in

equipment and infrastructure to meet both the needs and the required testing

standards. According to Ms. Rekha Sinha, executive director, International Life

Sciences Institute, the World Bank has sanctioned a loan of US$44 million to

US$55 million to strengthen the food testing infrastructure needed to validate

and certify the packaged foods (Sinha 2006).

Lack of physical infrastructure. According to Ms. Sinha, the lack of physical

infrastructure facilities in the food processing sector as a whole, such as cold

chains and good roads that enable the timely supply of raw materials, are

other bottlenecks.

Lack of flexible regulatory framework for functional foods. As discussed earlier,

the food industry is governed by the PFA, a 50-year-old piece of legislation.

According to those interviewed, several major bottlenecks are created by the

current regulation:

The Act has specific definitions for every food preparation permitted to be

sold in the country and, as such, it does not provide flexibility to the food

manufacturers to introduce new recipes without violating the law.10 To

complicate matters, different laws govern GM foods, drugs, and

pharmaceuticals. In all, there are about seven different laws governing the

food sector.

Agricultural and Rural Development

26

It is difficult for manufacturers to bring out new food preparations in a

timely way. There is a process for approving recipes that are not included

in the PFA (mainly functional foods and GM foods), but the appeals

process is cumbersome and time-consuming, and may take up to two years

for approval. In cases in which scientific evidence leads to a need to amend

the standards, the producers can appeal to have the PFA rules amended.

Under the PFA, the Central Committee for Food Standards is responsible

for the final decision regarding PFA rules.

Because many of these recipes are classified by their creators as proprietary

foods, manufacturers are reluctant to share data with the authorities,

fearing that this data might eventually be shared with competitors.

The process of launching a new food product is cumbersome because the

company has to go through a time-consuming application process.

Some resistance to GM foods. At the present time much opposition to GM

foods has come from the educated elite who fear environmental damage, loss

of biodiversity, and foreign control over Indias food supply. For example,

Greenpeace campaigners dismissed the protato, a GM potato containing

approximately 30 percent more protein, as an advertisement for

biotechnology. Years were spent in a lab trying to lever protein into potatoes,

while cheap, protein-rich pulses grow abundantly all over India, one

opponent stated. It makes you wonder what problem the scientists were

trying to solve (Vidal 2003).

Annex 3 documents Indias experience with Golden Rice and the HarvestPlus

Initiative, providing background along with some dissenting opinions about

why GM foods are counterproductive in alleviating malnutrition. Many people

are relatively open-minded regarding GM foods, however, because science is

still seen as a route to prosperity and a better quality of life (Ghosh 2003).

Many opportunities for growth in the functional foods sector relate to the need

to curb malnutrition. As previously stated by Dr. Rajesh Kapur, 60 percent of

children below 14 years of age are malnourished. His departments mandate

is to address this critical concern, and he cited the development of highprotein

biscuits as an example of its work (Kapur 2006). The program is now

in the commercial stage and the government plans to distribute the biscuits

through the midday meal schemes run in government schools across the

country.

Other opportunities include nutraceuticals, as Dr. Kapur stated that India has

the potential to be the worlds leading producer and exporter of nutraceuticals.

In the next five years, he estimated that the country could export

nutraceuticals, including Ayurvedic and herbal products, worth US$1 billion.

Health issues provide further opportunities for increasing the functional foods

market. Ms. Sinha claimed that child obesity is becoming a major health issue

in large Indian cities, and this social problem presents a market opportunity if

suitable functional foods can be developed to tackle it.

Health Enhancing Foods

27

Agricultural and Rural Development

Nutrition transition in India

Prakash S Shetty*

Nutrition Planning, Assessment and Evaluation, Food and Nutrition Division, Food and Agriculture Organization

(FAO) of the United Nations, Via delle Terme di Caracalla, I-00100 Rome, Italy

Abstract

Objective:

Demographic and epidemiological transitions in

India

India is in the phase of a rapid demographic transition. Life

expectancy is increasing while birth rates are on the

decline. The share of the population above 60 years of age

is growing at a rapid rate and is expected to exceed 200

million in 25 years. Those who cross the age of 60 today

are expected to live up to or over the age of 75 years. The

following estimates are indicative of the changes expected

in Indias population:

1. the total population will rise from 846.2 million in 1991

to 1263 million in 2016 (49% increase) and to 1.33

billion in 2026 (57% increase);

2. the population over 60 years old will rise from 54.7

million in 1991 to 113.0 million in 2016 (107% increase)

or from 6.4% of the population to 8.9%; it will increase

further to 179 million in 2026 (227% increase); and

3. the aged population (over 60 years) will constitute

13.3% of the 1333 million total population in 2026.

However, the population growth rate is not uniform in

all states or regions of the country. Table 14,5 illustrates the

demographic transition in the major Indian states. Kerala

*Corresponding author: Email [email protected] q The Author

The impact of urbanisation in India

Migrant studies enable us to study the interaction between

genetic and environmental determinants of NCDs, such as

non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM),

cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Studies of

migrants on the one hand demonstrate, for instance, that

adoption of the diet, lifestyle patterns and socio-cultural

practices of the indigenous population by migrants (i.e.

Table 1 Demographic transition in major Indian states: status and projection

State

State population

in 1991 (millions

of people)

Population

annual growth

rate, 198191 (%)

Year by which TFR

declines to 2.1 the

replacement level

Variation in level

of urbanisation

of 73/73
Search Experience Sujata Halarnkar Fall 2008 LIBR-282-05 For the mid-term project, I reviewed the sports nutrition industry in the United States to identify current trends, major manufacturers, and distributors. For the final project, I decided to explore India’s market and its potential for distributing US sports nutrition products. In this report, I have included some background information on India, reviewed current consumer trends, and identified key information necessary to explore distribution of health products possibilities. I have also included a number of Indian manufacturers of health products. Search Strategy From the experience of the mid-term project, I decided to begin my search with Yahoo! Finance and Google.com. Mainly, I looked for statistics and news article on the topic. A narrow topic made it difficult to find resources. India is an emerging market in sports nutrition industry and not much literature is available on the topic. Many new health product companies are being founded and slowly information about them is coming up on the Internet. I also explored Factiva.com. However, as previously experienced I found more or less the similar results. Obviously, it is easier and quicker to search and narrow down resources in the paid databases. I started my search with basic search terms and developed search terms from them. I noted down new and interesting search terms from news articles and reports. I found the Indian market complex and difficult to analyze. Cultural and social factors influence the Indian consumer market in many ways. Local survey or interview of consumers would have provided a better insight on the market. Surprisingly, I found sufficient information on the Indian manufacturers and distributors of health related
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