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N ATURE U NBOUND L ESSON 1 – W HAT IS E COLOGY Conservation Mr. Dieckhoff.

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NATURE UNBOUND LESSON 1 – WHAT IS ECOLOGY Conservation Mr. Dieckhoff
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Nature Unbound Lesson 1 What is Ecology

Nature UnboundLesson 1 What is EcologyConservationMr. DieckhoffWhat do you see in this picture? (write Down at least 5 be creative)Missouri Grassland near Nevada, MO

What do you see in this picture? (write Down at least 5 be creative)Missouri River near Lexington, MO

What do you see in this picture? (write Down at least 5 be creative)Mark Twain National Forest, Southeast MO

EcologyEcology Divided into:Biotic Examples:Abiotic Examples: Atoms-Molecules-Organelles-Cells-Tissues-Organs-Organisms-Population-Community-Ecosystem-Biosphere

What are the biotic (Underline) and abiotic (Bold) items in the following sentences (pg 4, paragraph 2)Muskrats and cattails both need water to survive. If a wetland dries up, cattails in the wetland soon die, and muskrats leave the wetland to look for new homes. In turn, living things can influence properties of water. Muskrats use plants, such as cattails, for food and to build their houses. In doing so, muskrats remove patches of vegetation and create areas of open water. With less vegetation to restrict air flow, more oxygen is mixed into the water when wind causes waves. Removing vegetation also removes shade, allowing sunlight to penetrate the water, increasing its temperature.

Organisms:All Need How does Cattail, Muskrat, and Mink get energy) Minerals, Protein, Vitamins Adaptations to Space (Muskrat)Dense coat of fur, waterproof, buoyant, webbed hind feet, flattened tail for rudder, can reduce heart rate, store oxygen, tolerate high levels of carbon dioxide, stay underwater for 17 minutes

VideosMuskrathttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-mj36HTIJFY

Minkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zc5ss_YIVbI PopulationsDefinition:

Boundaries are determined by

Population Size + births+ immigration- deaths- emigration

Study to help

Webquest what is the typical population size of one of the minkslargest predators in northern Missouri?

CommunitiesDefinition:

Tied together by: Muskrat feed on cattailsMink feed on muskrat kits Plants compete for sunlight (why grass is taller next to unmowed grass)Songbirds compete for nesting sites Ducks eat smartweed & its seedsSome seeds pass through digestive system to get distributed over other areas

EcosystemsDefinition:What kind of ecosystem is this?

BiosphereDefinition: Layer that supports all living things5.5 miles below sea to 3.5 miles above sea level

EcologistsDevelop hypothesis Independent Variable Dependent Variable Experimental Group Control Group How would you set up experiment:In the early 1980s, ecologists began observing a sharp decline in populations of birds nesting in large tracts of forest. From previous studies, most ecologists believed the decline was connected to habitat fragmentation. Habitat fragmentation occurs when large, continuous blocks of habitat are broken up into smaller portions when land is cleared to build roads, subdivisions or crop fields. John Faaborg and Rick Clawson, two ecologists in Missouri, noticed that large forests in the Ozarks were being fragmented when trees were cut for timber. These observations led them to ask the question: Are forest birds affected by timber harvests?ConservationGifford Pinchot vs. Aldo Leopold

Using page 12 of the Chapter, answer the following questions:

What do Pinchots and Leopolds idea of conservation have in common?

How do Pinchots and Leopolds idea of conservation differ?

ConclusionEcologyOrganismsPopulationsCommunitiesEcosystemsBiosphereWhat Ecologist DoConservation


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