Home >Documents >Graphic Layout

Graphic Layout

Date post:24-May-2015
Category:
View:1,277 times
Download:2 times
Share this document with a friend
Transcript:
  • 1. Graphic Layout

2. www.thinkeatgreen.ca 3. iiREPORT CONTENTSIntroduction 1Overview 2010/2011 - UBC undergraduate students findings3Participating schools and associated projects7UBC courses descriptions and activities9UBC student activity report by school 17- Kitsilano Secondary 19- David Thompson Secondary21- Windermere Secondary25- Vancouver Technical Secondary 28- Gladstone Secondary 30- Britannia Secondary 33- Sir Winston Churchill Secondary 34- University Hill Secondary 34- Queen Alexandra Elementary36- Sir William Van Horne Elementary38- General Brock Elementary39- Queen Elizabeth Elementary40- Tyee Elementary 41- Sir Wilfred Grenfell Elementary 42- David Lloyd George Elementary 43- Graham Bruce Elementary 44- Bayview Elementary452010 2011- Grandview uuqinakuuh Elementary 47- Sir John Franklin Elementary50- Simon Fraser Elementary 52- Trafalgar Elementary53- LEcole Bilingue Elementary 55Request for proposals and Summer Institute 2011 56 4. iiiThink&[email protected] Photo: Adam Blasberg 5. 1 The Think&[email protected] Project is a Community-University Research Alliance,partnering UBC, the Vancouver School Board and other organizations promotingchange in what public school students eat, learn and do at school in relation to food, health and the environment (listed below). The project aims to engage students with the sources of their food through growing, preparing, sharing and sustainably man- aging food waste at school. Think&[email protected] aims to foster food citizenship byINTRODUCTION providing the entire community of learnersfrom students to professors, teachers to chefs, farmers, gardeners, restaurateurs, and nutrition and health professionals with op- portunities to participate in the development of healthy and sustainable school food sys- tems During the first year of the project, close to 400 UBC undergraduate and graduate stu- dents worked in specific projects in 21 public schools in Vancouver, led by 30 co investigators and partners from a wide range of disciplines and communitybased food, environment, health & education organizations. This report is a summary of the work con- ducted by the UBC undergraduate student teams in the 2010-11 academic year, the first one of Think&[email protected] Needless to say, there is a spectrum of detail and articu- lation amongst the undergraduate team reports, and the leadership of Think&[email protected] does not necessarily share the views expressed in all of the re- ports. The UBC students have truly benefitted from the opportunity to move their learning outside of the lecture hall and into the community. Through this pedagogical exercise, the students have been exposed to the current literature on food, health and environ- ment and sustainable food systems, participated in field trips to local farms and schools, and had the opportunity to work with Vancouver leaders in all aspects of food systems. They have been working closely with the most accomplished teachers, community gar- deners, urban agriculturalists, chefs, restaurateurs, and restaurant designers. These activities will continue for at least the next five years. Incoming cohorts of UBC students will build upon and deepen the work of their colleagues from previous years, beginning where they left off, spending more time working in the project and in the schools. Through this iterative process, the project intends to deliver school specific projects and collect data regarding school programs and policies, teachers practices, and students knowledge, attitudes and behaviors related to food, health and the environment. The Think & Eat Green @ School project comprises a wide range of partners, described in five general categories: Local communitybased organizations that focus on food security, sustainability, and related issues, including the Environmental Youth Alliance, the Society Promoting Environ- 6. 2mental Conservation, Growing Chefs, and Farm Folk/City Folk; of Canada; Permanent citywide organizations and bodies, involved in 6. Sustainability, meaning that the food system does not damage thegovernance, service delivery and policymaking, including thecapacity of ecosystems to endure and support the permanentVancouver School Board, the Vancouver Food Policy Council, and production and reproduction of food sources and the stability of foodVancouver Coastal Health;supply over time. Provincial or national communitybased organizations, including Think&[email protected] addresses food system sustainability by ena-the Public Health Association of British Columbia, Canadian Centre for bling staff and students to influence how their food is produced andPolicy Alternatives, and the Evergreen Foundation; where it comes from, through concrete school projects in areas of: Individual city schools 21 in the first iteration of the project in the Food production at school (i.e. food gardens, composting andFall 2010 and 23 schools by the end of Spring 2011;environmentally sound and productive disposal of end products); Universitybased partners, including 15 professors and 15 graduate Food consumption, preparation and procurement at school (i.e.students from the University of British Columbia, 1 researcher fromschool food programs, cooking skills, and eating spaces, farmtoboth Simon Fraser University and Ryerson University. school programs for fresh local food); Curriculum and teaching and learning innovations aiming at inte-At UBC, partners include the Faculty of Land and Food Systems, the grated learning on the whole cycle of food systems, from production,Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at UBC Farm, researchers fromprocessing, transportation, distribution, consumption, and disposal ofthe Faculty of Education and from the schools of Landscape Architec- end food products (i.e. composing and recycling vs. waste) andture, and Community and Regional Planning. impacts of health and environment; Food policy and institutional adaptation to climate change (policyThe Think & Eat Green @ School Project builds on concepts of foodand programs to support more healthy and sustainable food systemssystem sustainability, recognizing that the ways food is produced, at school).processed, packaged, transported, consumed, and disposed of have These concrete school projects involve collaborative learning amongstsignificant impact on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and our a multitude of players, from university students and researchers, healthecological footprint. The project also encompasses the concept of and educational institutions to a network of communitybased andfood security, emphasizing that to achieve food security, all six of the communitysupported nonprofit organizations working on food, health,following components must be present: and the environment, linking farms to schools, city dwellers with farm-1. Availability of enough safe and nutritious food for everybody; ers, school cooks with successful green chefs, restaurateurs, restaurant2. Affordability, making it possible for all people to satisfy their food designers, gardeners, school authorities, teachers and students.needs within their purchasing power;3. Accessibility of food or the ease with which people may obtainSchools are places where students can learn about the food systemavailable food;by being engaged in growing, harvesting, preparing, cooking and4. Acceptability, meeting diverse cultural and culinary needs, and eating food. Schools can significantly contribute to the greening ofethical standards of respect for human and animal lives in productiontheir communities and neighbourhoods through the reduction ofsystems; greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and lightening of ecological foot-5. Safety, meaning that the food supply meets the sanitary standards prints. 7. 3 Land and Food Systems students envision a school where: Parents, students and teachers areOVERVIEW findings:fully engaged and committed tosustainability within the school foodsystem. Elementary andhighschoolstudents have the knowledge andabilities to make their own food athome to bring to school, wherepossible. The school system supports andUBC undergraduate studentsteaches the development of foodsystem skills and provides healthy,sustainable food and meal optionsat school Land and Food Systemsstudent results: Mostly reporting on: 1) School gardens / grounds & 2) School cafeterias / lunchrooms. Students collected both qualita- tive and quantitative data. Results varied between schools, 2010/2011 illustrating different realities and factors affecting school food systems. Some findings may betrans- ferable between schools. The findings are preliminary and will be subject to verification by incoming teams. 8. 4FINDINGS Strengths in schoolfood systems 1.Food, environment, nutrition, and health are effective integrating topics to promote greener, more sustainable, and healthier school environments. 2.Most partner schools are actively working to improve school food system sustainability:Many UBC students did not expect this level ofsupport.Many UBC students had not experienced attemptsto bring schools into food sustainability as elemen-tary and high school students. 3.Every partner school has at least one passionate stake- holder willing to put in time and energy into enhancing and promoting school food system sustainability:Such stakeholders need to be supported. 4.Even when meal programs are in place, food brought from home is still generally predominant. 5.Parental influence on providing and encouraging healthier and more sustainable choices for their children at school is a key component of school food systems. 6.Excellent examples of food programs and facilities exist in some of the visited schools within the Vancouver School Board (VSB). 9. 7S CHOOL UBC C OURSEA CTIVITYKitsilanoLFS 250Garden Maintenance &Management PlanDavid Thompson LFS 250Garden Maintenance &Management Plan; Kitchenand Cafeteria Assessment;Menu Analysis: Food, Sustaina-bility, and Health LFS 350Development of a School WidePARTICIPATINGComposting ProgramSchools and Associated Projects FNH 473Sustainability Week SOYLStudent Leadership and Sum-mer Garden MaintenanceS E C O N DA RY S C H O O L SWindermere LFS 250Curriculum Development;Kitchen and Cafeteria Assess-ment; Menu Analysis: Food,Sustainability, and Health FNH 473Enhancement of School WideComposting ProgramVancouver TechnicalLFS 250Garden Maintenance &Management PlanSOYLStudent Leadership and Sum-mer Garden MaintenanceGladstoneLFS 250Garden Maintenance &Management Plan; CurriculumDevelopment; Kitchen andCafeteria Assessment; MenuAnalysis: Food, Sustainability,and Health FNH 473Garden Fiesta - IncreasingStudent Interest and Participa-tion in the School GardenBritannia SOYLStudent Leadership and Sum-mer Garden MaintenanceSir Winston Churchill SOYLStudent Leadership and Sum-mer Garden MaintenanceUniversity HillLFS 450Fostering Connections with theUBC Farm 10. 8S CHOOLUBC C OURSE A CTIVITYQueen Alexandra LFS 250School Food Environment AssessmentFNH 473Assessing the Breakfast ProgramSir William Van Horne LFS 250School Food Environment AssessmentGeneral Brock LFS 250Garden Maintenance & Management PlanQueen Elizabeth LFS 250Garden Maintenance & Management Plan; School Food Environment Assess- mentTyeeLFS 250Curriculum DevelopmentSir Wilfred GrenfellLFS 250Garden Maintenance & ManagementE L E M E N TA RY S C H O O L S PlanDavid Lloyd GeorgeLFS 250School Food Environment AssessmentLFS 350Enhancing the Sustainability of a Lunch ProgramGraham D. Bruce LFS 350Farm2School Salad Bar ProgramBayview LFS 250Garden Maintenance & Management PlanGrandview/uuqinakuuhLFS 250Garden Maintenance & Management Plan School Food Environment Assess- mentFNH 473Incorporating a Salad Bar into the School Lunch ProgramSir John Franklin LFS 250School Food Environment AssessmentFNH 473Improving the Nutritional Status of Children through Snack ChoiceSimon FraserLFS 250School Food Environment AssessmentTrafalgarLARC 503Plan and Design an Outdoor Classroom and Enhanced School EnvironmentAPBI 402 Soil Testing and AnalysisLEcole BilingueLFS 250Garden Maintenance & ManagementPhoto: Office.comPlan 11. UBC STUDENTActivity Report by School 17Photo: Adam Blasberg 12. 18The project will help teachsustainability, engage all students and promote thepositive impacts ofconnecting people , food and the environment.Photo: InnerCity FarmsPhoto: Adam Blasberg Photo: InnerCity Farms 13. 19 Kitsilano SecondaryC. Solar Analysis: The garden bed next to the tennis courts has no objectsor other vegetation blocking it, and therefore receives almost full sunthroughout the year. The orchard garden however, is surrounded on sever-ve,0t h Aal sides by the school building. Its exposure to direct sunlight is therefore55 0 W 1 2J6 ess: 2 C V6 Klimited in the summer months and very limited during the winter months.Addrc.ca ncou ver B o.vsb.bVa tsilan D. Micro-climate Analysis: Due to the uniformity of the tennis court garden p://ki te: htt1,434 Websibed and its surroundings, there is little variance of heat and light through- tion:nt popula s,out the bed. Due to its open concept, crops planted here will be more Stude tudie n ta l Stacts: vir on mevulnerable to wind damage. l C ons (EnSchoo u ma i nolla Ditsila The orchard garden, as previously stated is surrounded on three sides by hae ) ics, K -Rap ersion onomme E cthe school building. This setup blocks most wind from the garden, and pro-h Im mr (Ho FrencHoove ) vides heat from the building to the garden, though the shade provided ryl- Che y School prevents it from getting very warm.Sec ondarE. Circulation Analysis: The tennis court garden is a long low strip that is eas-ily accessible. Due to this layout there is a very low chance of it being tram-Student Activity - Garden Maintenance and Management Planspled by those tending it, and it is unlikely that crops will be neglected as(LFS 250) they are all very easily reached.The orchard garden is very accessible, and is laid out in a way that makesDates of Visit(s)- The UBC LFS 250 students visited Kitsilano Secondarycirculation easy and straightforward. As can be seen in Figure 2 this area isSchool during the third week of November, 2010.very good in terms of access, circulation, and learning space. There arethree entrances, lots of space to move around, and benches everywhere.MethodsTrampling should not be an issue in this garden either.The undergraduate students completed a Garden Maintenance andF. Community Analysis: The community support behind the Kitsilano Sec-Management Plan analysis which involved making maps of the gardenondary School garden is very strong. SPEC plays the main role, providingarea, conducting and analyzing a soil sample, performing a solar analysis,crops for planting. They also take part in lessons by taking a third of thea micro-climate analysis, a water analysis, a circulation analysis (looking atclass out to the garden and instructing through a hands-on approach.the flow of traffic in and around the garden) and a community analysis,SPEC is also very involved with Kitsilanos garden in the summer. They workwhich looks at the strengths and areas for improvement for the supportwith Sprouting Chefs to teach kids about healthy eating and cookinggiven to the garden from the community.choices.General FindingsThe garden at Kitsilano Secondary mainly benefits the Grade 9 French Im-Kitsilano Secondary has two separate garden areas; the garden bed and mersion Ecology students who maintain, nurture, and use the producethe orchard garden (see Garden Diagrams). grown in the garden. With the limited space of the garden it is difficult toequally delegate tasks to 90 students when 10 can do all the work.A. Soil Analysis: The garden bed and the orchard garden both containsandy loam soil. This soil type is almost ideal as it is very porous and has lots Recommendationsof surface area making it good for aeration and drainage; however, it isThrough the above analysis, it was determined that with the full sun, warmfairly poor at holding nutrients.micro-climate and shallow root depth, crops like basil, corn, blueberries,B. Water Analysis: Both of the garden locations at Kitsilano Secondary areraspberries, melons, oats, and wheat could be planted in the garden bedeasily watered by tap-and-hose systems. The tennis court plot is relatively for the summer season. The current winter crop selection; cauliflower, broc-flat, with good drainage and is thus unlikely to suffer from pooling problems.coli, kale, rye, peas, lettuce and cabbage, are quite appropriate but 14. 20could also be supplemented with winter wheat. It was noted that if partial Garden Diagramsshade were provided for the garden by the tennis court, a greater variety ofcrops could be planted. Also, planting legumes in either location would lowerthe need for fertilizer and associated costs, making the garden more economi-cally sustainable. With a good variety of crops, the students can not only growand learn about the different plants but also benefit from a well-rounded diet.Overall it was determined that the garden for the Grade 9 French ImmersionEcology class is an excellent educational tool to inform students on how tocreate a more sustainable lifestyle. However, currently the garden onlyreaches a small number of students. Fortunately, Kitsilano Secondary is alreadyplanning to expand the garden. That is a great step!Once the garden is expanded, it will be possible, and very beneficial, toincorporate more classes, especially those outside of the French immersionprogram. This would expand the gardens impact to more students and, inturn, more families. It is even possible to begin this process before the gardenexpansion is complete. One suggestion to do this would be to incorporate thegarden into other classes, such as biology. Experiments such as viewing differ-ent splices of vegetables under a microscope to observe their cells could beused to do this. The garden could be used to support learning in topics rangingfrom mitosis to general botany. Using vegetables produced in the garden forCirculation analysis, solar analysis, micro-climates analysis, and water analysis of the tennis court garden.these experiments would take only a handful of produce, while also includinga greater number of students. Courses with less directly related content can beinvolved as well. For example, a math class could take the measurementsneeded for the planned expansion, and a shop class could be involved inbuilding the garden boxes for the new site. There are many ways to use aschool garden, and Kitsilano Secondary has a good opportunity to expand itsgarden program alongside the expansion of the physical garden. Circulation analysis, solar analysis, micro-climate analysis, and water analysis of the orchard courtyard garden. 15. 38 Sir William Van Hornerate into the school food system. Sir William Van Horne also has a gardenand healthy eating and food preparation lessons to help students learnElementarywhere food comes from and also how to make informed healthy eatingchoices. The LFS students found that the school is limited by funding formany of these programs and challenged by time constraints required for ess:eetthe planning and implementation of those programs by teachers and staffA d d r ntario Str 5W 2L8 5 O r, BC V585 uvemembers who wish to help as all of this falls outside of their job descriptionVanco 96 5and allotted teaching time. The students also found that the time allotted13-4(6 04) 7 67 for lunch was not enough. The eating areas needed improvements in illu-hone: 49 Telep 04) 713- mination and temperature. Overall, the LFS students believe that Sir Williamax: (6 ~4 0 0F tion: Van Horne is interested in improvements to make the school system morent Popula Stude 010) secure and sustainable.ts:al) uly 2 lContac r incipun til JSchooon (Pcipal RecommendationsJohns ( P r i n r) -Denise ll ot t e ch e There are numerous resources and strategies available to help Sir William tt i P s (Tea - Pae Prin eacher) Van Horne enhance the food security and sustainability programs currentlyiann - Mar Cassi dy (Tcher) in place. The Think & Eat Green @ School community partners, including Yvettei (Tea ader)-Ge rman A C LeGrowing Chefs (http://www.growingchefs.ca/) and Sustainable Opportuni- - Mary an da (Pties for Youth Leadership (SOYL), can help the teachers and administrators e Mir - Davat Sir William Van Horne work to incorporate food security and sustainabil-ity into the curriculum and enhance the existing garden and healthyeating and food preparation lessons. Additionally there are a number ofStudent Activity - School Food Environment Assessment (LFS 250) initiatives through the Think & Eat Green @ School project, such as theSummer Institute and Sustainable Mini Grants, which can provide profes-Dates of Visit(s) - The students visited the school for data collection the sional development opportunities, networking opportunities, and funding.third week of November. Some specific suggestions for the school include providing areas to eatoutside near the garden to enhance the eating areas and raise awarenessMethods about garden initiatives. Also, we suggest that the school works with localThe methods used for data collection included informal interviews with varioussuppliers to find a more consistent source of organic local produce. Also, itstakeholders and field observation/notes. The questions asked during the inter- seems very important to enhance garden production and work to incor-view included: Does your administration support healthy eating? How? andporate some of the food produced into the lunch program. In general, weDoes your school have or follow any written policies that promote healthyrecommend that the PAC considers ways to improve the hot luncheating? The interviewed stakeholders included the principal, vice-principal, program to include more nutritionally and environmentally sustainablethree teachers, and two lunch supervision aids. The observations took place food choices.throughout the day and included observation during lunchtime for both thekindergarten students, who eat separately, and the older children. General FindingsThe LFS students found that there is a great interest at Sir William Van Horne infinding ways to improve food consumption and disposal practices in theschool, including its food related cultural awareness. The schools recyclingprogram was very accessible and effective. The LFS students noticed someefforts by the food providers at school to include new items and meet theschool more varied cultural preferences. Sir William Van Horne also provides amilk program to include more calcium and other nutrients into the studentsdiet. The BC Fruits and Vegetable program is also in effect but the programssporadic delivery of food to the school makes it difficult to consistently incorpo- 16. 39 General Brock Elementary cold, nor is the climate dry, the garden is not particularly affected. Potsclosest to the tunnel will likely be the most affected by strong winds comingfrom the Southeast in April and July. In July, these plants might dry out duet.ain S to the combination of drier climate and wind exposure. 60 M 3R8 ess : 48 V5 VSoil is of good quality, consisting of organic soil with bark compost andA d d r uver, BCanco 245sand, plus organic fertilizer.V.713.5hone: 6 0 4 5 Telep : ~2 1lationRecommendations ntPopu Stude tacts: rincipal) According to conversations between PAC contacts and UBC students, thel C onSchoo(Pdams eacher)Parent Advisory Committee has suggested more green space. ParentA Bruce Wong (Tcher) - (Tea involvement should therefore be encouraged for garden upkeep. -E r ni e e C o l v i n T e a c h e r )rinn (The school could encourage social gathering around garden boxes by- N o a n B a rt o Chair)- S u s en (PAC installing more benches closer to the garden (currently there are two in theCh - CL general area of the garden). Moving the SPEC-initiated garden boxes tothe other garden area might also help to improve the visual appeal of thespace, as well as allowing for more consistent exposure to sunlight. Thegravel sports field (which is not often used) is another potential area toStudent Activity - Garden Maintenance and Management Plan (LFSwhich the SPEC garden boxes could be moved. It is also highly recom-250)mended that interested staff and teachersattend thatThink&[email protected] Summer Institute, which will greatly facilitate theDates of Visit(s)- Visits took place during the third week of November,incorporation of the garden into the schools curriculum and programming.2010. Please see the end of this report for details.UBC students who performed the water analysis recommend a rain barrelMethodsand/or watering cans for more efficient and effective irrigation. MoreThe undergraduate students completed a Garden Maintenance and parent volunteer or community involvement is needed to ensure consistentManagement Plan analysis which involved making maps of the garden watering throughout summer months.area, conducting and analyzing a soil sample, performing a solar analysis,Drought-resistant plants could be planted in the Southeast corners of thea micro-climate analysis, a water analysis, a circulation analysis (looking atplant boxes to help make survival during hotter, drier summer months morethe flow of traffic in and around the garden) and a community analysis,likely. A windbreak could also be helpful for protecting this area.which looks at the strengths and areas for improvement for the supportgiven to the garden from the community. Loam soil would increase plant health and yield. The soil is sufficient, butnitrogen availability needs to be maintained by continuing to plant coverGeneral Findingscrops. Increased use of the compost system by students is advisable; stu-It was found that there was little circulation (foot traffic) around thedents, staff, as well as community partners could be involved in promotinggarden, since few students spend time around the garden and usually gocomposting at school. Also, the composters could be moved closer to theto the playground instead.garden area itself.The garden was in a less-than-ideal location for sunlight, as the garden is Sugar beets, oats, wheat, onions, leeks, chard, parsley, cilantro, cauliflow-shielded from sunlight by surrounding buildings. Box one receives the mosters, brussel sprouts, rhubarb, turnips and kale would be good additions tosunlight, and box four receives the least. The most sun is received duringthe garden.the morning since there are no obstructions to the easterly sky. Duringwinter months when the sun is lower, sunlight decreases dramatically.Some plants were more susceptible to water loss due to their exposure tosun and wind flow.In May, August, and September, strong wind from the Northwest is partiallyblocked by the school building, and since temperatures are not particularly 17. 40Queen Elizabeth Elementary(apple/plum), berries, kiwis and grape vines. An issue to keep in mind ispending construction around the portable schoolrooms.There is a Green School program for teachers, and potentially the teachers enueth Av from the adjoining Jules Quesnel School could become involved in that asest 16102 W R 3E3/well. However, it was found that there is not always consensus on what ess: 4 V6 .bc.caA d d r uver, BC th.vsb healthy living entails, so there is room for increased connections andel izabeVanco queen collaborations between initiatives and projects. The school participates in ttp://2 Website: h: ~ 40 the BC Fruit and Vegetable Snack Program. Parents and Kindergardenerslation nt Popumaintain the garden over the summers. Compost receptacles are present, Studetacts: Principal) Gardenbut not in use. l C on(Schoo a Procter (Teacher, Soil from the prospective garden plot has a sandy loam texture. Water taps - Donn ha Tousawas ir ) are far from the prospective garden area, and hoses are becoming worn - Nat inator)C ChaC oord Taylor (PA out. There may be excessive water in the depressed garden area, and this e- Jan also creates limited opportunities for seating, so that students could beencouraged to sit and enjoy the garden. During summer, the gardenreceived sunlight from 7:30 18:00, and during fall at noon. There is onemain footpath to the garden, and minimal risk of children stepping on orStudent Activity - Garden Maintenance and Management Plan (LFS 250) damaging plants. Wind protection is provided by portable classrooms andSchool Food Environment Assessment (LFS 250)the tree line.Dates of Visit(s) - From July 12, 2010 until August 20, 2010MethodsThe undergraduate students completed a Garden Maintenance and Manage-ment Plan analysis which involved making maps of the garden area, conduct-ing and analyzing a soil sample, performing a solar analysis, a micro-climateanalysis, a water analysis, a circulation analysis (looking at the flow of traffic inand around the garden) and a community analysis, which looks at thestrengths and areas for improvement for the support given to the garden fromthe community.The methods used for data collection in the School Food Environment Assess-ment included informal interviews with various stakeholders and field observa- SOIL COMPOSITIONtion/notes. The questions asked during the interview included: Does youradministration support healthy eating? How? and Does your school have orfollow any written policies that promote healthy eating? The interviewedstakeholders included the principal, vice-principal, three teachers, and twolunch supervision aids. The observations took place throughout the day andincluded observation during lunchtime for both the kindergarten students, whoeat separately, and the older children.General FindingsUBC student assessors noted that the organic food/herb garden at QueenElizabeth consists of several outdoor boxes, and that there are some learningopportunities associated with these gardens. There is the potential for develop-ing a garden plot in addition to the boxes, but irrigation could be an issue since SUMMER SUNLIGHTWIND PROTECTIONhoses are difficult to haul. Adults would have to be responsible for wateringunless alternatives could be developed. Also, there are plans plant fruit trees 18. REQUESTS Institutefor Proposals and Summer2011 56Photo: Office.com 19. 57REQUESTS FORPROPOSALS aBecomeThink&EatGreen School The Think&[email protected] Project is a Community-University Research 1.Application to be a Think&EatGreen School and receive a grant of Alliance promoting change in what public school students eat, learn andup to $2,000 do at school in relation to food, health and the environment. The project2.Additional application to bring the farm into your Think&EatGreen aims to engage students with the sources of their food through growing,School to receive an additional $1,500 Farm to School grant preparing, sharing and managing foodwaste atschool.3.Enrolment in the Think&[email protected] Summer Institute on July 4- Think&[email protected] aims to foster food citizenship by providing the 6, 2011 entire community of learnersfrom students to professors, teachers to chefs, farmers, gardeners, restaurateurs, and nutrition and health profes- 1. Application to be a Think&EatGreen School sionals with opportunities to participate in the development of healthy Benefits of Participation and sustainable school food systems. Your school can participate byAbility to receive up to $3,500 for food system projects (through becoming a Think&EatGreen School and receive a grant of up to $2,000 Think&[email protected] Small Grants and Farm to School funds); and other support to implement food initiatives at your school.Participation in a cohort / community of learners aiming at creating The Public Health Association of BC (PHABC), a key community partner ina healthy and sustainable food system within the Vancouver SchoolBoard; the Think&[email protected] Project, has also secured funds from Vancity enviroFund to support Farm to School programs. The goal of PHABCs FarmParticipation in professional development opportunities including theThink&[email protected] Summer Institute; to School initiative is to increase access to fresh, nutritious, locally-grown foods on school premises and to build the local food economy. First, a Access to community and UBC expertise; relationship is developed between a school and local farmers. The farmersSupport of UBC students to implement your projects. then grow and harvest food to sell to the school where it is prepared andCriteria to be a Think&EatGreen School dished up to students. Additional opportunities for farmers to share their Preference will be given to schools that can demonstrate the following: knowledge of food and agriculture with students, staff and volunteers areA working team of 3 or more, composed of teachers and staff com- created. PHABC seeks to bring the Farm into Think&EatGreen Schools. Wemitted to strengthening the connections within the food system at are asking applicants demonstrate an appreciation of local farms, localtheir school (teachers, administration, support staff, food service foods and local food systems by integrating these concepts into theirstaff, maintenance staff, students and parents may be included); proposed Think&[email protected] program. Minimally applicants mustA commitment to initiatives that close the food loop by seeking to commit to providing local and sustainably produced foods in a school make connections between different aspects of the food system lunch program. PHABC will provide an additional $1,500 and other (i.e. growing, preparing, sharing and managing waste) at school; supports for this purpose. Participation of a team in the Think&[email protected] SummerInstitute in July; This application has several opportunities for interested schools:Partnerships (with community-based organizations and/or otherschools); 20. 58Willingness to involve UBC students and facilitate their involvement in the Projects that establish links between schools and farms for healthierdevelopment of food system activities and projects at your school;school meal programs and cafeteria menus and learning opportuni-Willingness to participate in research aimed at developing a healthyties.and sustainable school food system; Release time for teachers and staff to collaborate, develop andCommitment to participate in the project for 2 years. implement proposed activitiesCelebrations around food (e.g. a food day or food week at school).It is understood that no one school may meet all of the criteria; however, appli-cations that demonstrate that they are able to satisfy as many of the above Artistic projects related to food systems issues (including videos,points as possible will be given priority. Applications with large teams and pro- multi-media, painting, music, theatres).jects that emphasize integration within the food system will be eligible for larger To applygrants (up to $2,000). Applications that are smaller in scope will be eligible forPlease send an email to [email protected] to let us know that you aresmaller grants. planning to apply.When the following application form is complete, email or mail it to:Eligible for Think&[email protected] Small Grants (up to $2,000)Think&[email protected] has set aside $20,000 from the Social Sciences &Mailing Address: Application: Think&[email protected] Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC) for supporting smallMCML 179 - 2357 Main Mall Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z4projects in Vancouver schools in the 2011-2012 school year. If you are eligible, Email: [email protected] small grants are available to help you start-up, expand, or improveschool projects in the areas of food production, waste management, food All applications must be received no later than May 13. Schools will benotified about their application by the end of May. Further questions orpreparation, and teaching and learning activities.inquiries can be directed to [email protected] possible projects could include:2. Additional Applicationto Bring theFarm into yourFood production including gardens and orchards.Think&EatGreen SchoolComposting and other waste management projects.Additional Benefits of Participation in Farm to SchoolCooking and other culinary / food preparation activities involvingstudents. Additional $1,500 grant;Teaching and learning that connect food, health, and the environmentSupport from a farm liaison to provide connections for purchases offoods from local farms and farm field trips;across the curriculum.Spring training session with farmers, chefs, evaluation consultants,Projects that establish links between growing, preparing and eating foodetc. to help start the program;at school with new curriculum and ways of teaching and learning.Registration at a Farm-to-You conference in November;Programs that provide healthy and sustainable foods for students.Program evaluation and support;Education materials and tools for teachers and farmers; 21. 59Membership and participation in a supportive Farm to School net- To applywork with links to others Farm to School leads.Please ensure the following application form is complete and then email itAdditional Criteria for Participation in Farm to Schoolor mail it to:Preference will be given to schools that can demonstrate the following:Mailing Address:Application: Think&[email protected] the amount of local food served in schools by 15% or MCML 179 - 2357 Main Mallmore;Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z4Ability to integrate connections to farms and the food system into Email: [email protected] classroom and school environment;All applications must be received no later than May 13. Schools will beSupports at least one local farm;notified about their application by the end of May.Ensures the lunch is offered minimally 24 times before the end of thePlease note that an offer of participation in this Farm to School initiative will2011/12 school year; and 40 times in 2012/13;be contingent upon a site visit by the Selection Committee. FurtherIs environmentally friendly (e.g. reuse of materials, waste reduction, questions or inquiries specifically related to Farm to School can be directedrecycling, composting);to [email protected] equitable access to all children in the school, regardless ofmeans. 3. Participation in the Summer InstituteEligible For Farm to School GrantThe Think&[email protected] Summer Institute will focus on food security and sustainability issues in collaboration and partnership with teachers,Funding has been received through Vancity enviroFund to support administrators, staff and students from Vancouver School Board schools.programs in Vancouver, Richmond and West Vancouver and 3 enthusiastic The Institute is aimed at finding collaborative solutions to increase theschools in Vancouver are now being sought to participate. knowledge and understanding of the connections between food, healthKitchen equipment (e.g. food processors, soup pots, dishes, servingand the environment across the food system in the schools. A combinationspoons, knives, soap and towel dispensers, etc). of plenaries and streamed workshops and activities will be relevant to bothHonorariums for coordination and/or costs related to volunteer elementary and secondary schools and curriculums. Workshops and activi-appreciation.ties will focus on different components of the school food system: including food gardens and orchards; composting and waste management; foodEducational Resources or costs, including farm field trips +/- farm procurement, preparation and consumption; curriculum and pedagogicalhonoraria, teaching resources, etc. innovations; and school food policies.Food costs for the initial start up week or food for taste tests. The Summer Institute will be held at the first week of July, from Monday, JulyTraining, including Food Safe training.4th to Wednesday, July 6th. Workshops and hands-on, experiential activitiesThe funds cannot be used for:over three days at UBC will follow the different components of the food cycle at school, including making connections to curriculum andOngoing food costs. Experience has demonstrated that Farm to pedagogy as well as school food policy. Participants will rotate throughSchool lunches can generate funds! different themes including:Ongoing coordination costs; 22. 60Hands in the Soil: Food production and composting.Cooking and Eating Together: Food preparation and consumption.Connections to the Classroom: Integration of the food cycle intocurriculum and action plans.To applyThe registration form can be found on the Vancouver School Board website,under Sustainability on the Professional Development Current Opportunitiespage, or directly at:http://www2.vsb.bc.ca/vsbprograms/prod/register.htm?page=workshopdetails&workshopid=1238The Think & Eat @ School Project is supported by a Strategic Research Grant on theEnvironment from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of CanadasCURA Program.Partners: PublicHealth Associa onofBC 23. Full report available at: http://www.thinkeatgreen.ca/2010-2011 24. ACT LOCALLYThe Think & Eat Green @ School project will be a success when (many)The Think & Eat Green @ School project comprises a wide range ofschools embrace an explicit orientation toward human and environmentalpartners, described in five general categories:health and food system sustainability.- Local community-based organizations that focus on food security,sustainability, and related issues, including the Environmental Youth Alliance,Farm Folk/City Folk, Growing Chefs, and the Society for the Promotion ofEnvironmental Conservation.- Permanent city-wide organizations and bodies, involved in governance,service delivery and policy-making, including the Vancouver School Board, theVancouver Food Policy Council, and Vancouver Coastal Health;The objective of the project is to contribute to regional food system sustain-- Provincial or national community-based organizations, including theability and institutional adaptations to climate change. By working with schoolsPublic Health Association of British Columbia, Canadian Centre for Policyand a community of learners involved in community-based and school-basedAlternatives, and the Evergreen Foundation;projects, we will develop healthy, sustainable school food systems that include:- Individual city schools 21 in the first iteration of the project in the Fall 2010 Food and environment education across the curriculumand 23 schools by the end of Spring 2011; School gardens that produce food to be consumed in schools- University-based partners, including UBC, Simon Fraser University, and Functioning food waste compost and recycling systems Ryerson University (including their multiple units). At UBC, partners include the Food programs that provide safe, healthy, and sustainable food for Faculties of Community and Regional Planning, Education, Landscape Architec- students ture, Land and Food Systems, and the UBC Farm.Main activities:Working with the most accomplished teachers, community gardeners, urban agriculturalists, chefs, restaurateurs, restaurant designers and University of British Columbia builders in Vancouver school communities & partnering with teachers,Faculty of Land and Food Systems students and parents. 107-2357 Main Mall Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z4Involving over 300 UBC undergraduate and graduate students per year in the next five years to collaborate on school specific projects and collect Tel: 604 731 3146 data regarding school programs and policies, teachers practices, andEmail: [email protected] students knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. Web: www.thinkeatgreen.caCollaborating with more than 25 co-investigators from a wide range ofWith the financial support: disciplines and community-based food, environment, health & educa- tion organizations. Using their experience, expertise, and existing community connections to enhance, deepen, and support existing and future food system sustainability projects.www.thinkeatgreen.ca 25. THINK & EAT GREEN @ SCHOOLThink & Eat Green @ School is a Community-University Research Alliance promoting change in what children eat, learn and do at school in relation to food, health, the environment, and sustain-ability. By working closely with school authorities, teachers, parents, and youth, theproject aims to reconnect students with the sources of their food. Think & Eat Green @ School addresses food system sustainability by enabling staff and students to influence how their food is produced and where it comes from, through concrete school projects in areas of: Food production at school (i.e. food gardens, composting and disposalof end products);The Think & Eat Green @ School Project builds on concepts of food system Food consumption, preparation and procurement at school (i.e. schoolsustainability, recognizing that the ways food is produced, processed, packaged,food programs and eating spaces);transported, consumed, and disposed of have significant impact on greenhouse gas(GHG) emissions and our ecological footprint. The project also encompasses the Curriculum (teaching and learning) innovations aiming at integratedconcept of food security, emphasizing that to achieve food security, all six of the learning on the whole cycle of food systems, from production,following components must be present: processing, transportation, distribution, consumption, and disposal ofend food products (i.e. composting and recycling vs. waste); 1. Availability of enough safe and nutritious food for a given population; Food policy and institutional adaptation to climate change (policy and Think & Eat Green @ School provides opportunities for students and staff at 2. Affordability, making it possible for all people to satisfy their food needsprograms to support more healthy and sustainable food systems).all levels to reconnect with the sources of their food and to see food as the grand connector of all aspects of human life, including our relationships with each other within their purchasing power;These concrete school projects involve collaborative learning amongst a multi- and with nature. 3.Accessibility of food or the ease with which a population may obtain tude of players, from university students and researchers, health and educational institutions to a network of community-based and community-supported non- available food; and profit organizations working on food, health, and the environment, linking farms 4. Acceptability and use of food, or meeting cultural and culinary needs, to schools, city dwellers with farmers, school cooks with successful green chefs, Learning and acting to address global including having skills to properly utilize food; restaurateurs, restaurant designers, gardeners, school authorities, teachers and problems at the local level is where ordinary students.people can make a direct difference. 5.Safety, meaning that the food supply meets the sanitary standards of Schools are places where children can learn about the food system by being Canada; engaged in growing, harvesting, preparing, cooking and eating food. Schools can Think & Eat Green @ School fosters food citizenship by providing the entire 6.Sustainability, meaning that the food system does not damage thesignificantly contribute to the greening of their communities and neighbour- community of learnersfrom pupils to professors, teachers to chefs, farmers, capacity of ecosystems to endure and support the permanent production hoods through the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and to the light- gardeners, restaurateurs, and nutrition and health professionalswith opportu- and reproduction of food sources and the stability of food supply over time.ening of its ecological footprint. nities to be involved in all aspects of the food system to learn how to participate in decisions that shape the food system of public schools and educational institu- tions, and by extension, the food system of the local communities and the City of Vancouver.Approximately 45% of food consumed in Photo credits: InnerCityFarms andBC is imported. Climate change and other Think&Eat Green project Think & Eat Green @ School addresses the question of how the hundreds ofglobal issues therefore affect the foodthousands of people that comprise complex institutions, such as the public school system, can participate in a process of social learning, creation and action tosystem sustainability of BC communities. influence the food system and contribute to a transition to sustainability.

Popular Tags:

Click here to load reader

Reader Image
Embed Size (px)
Recommended