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Where do we look for accommodation information for TAKS, TAKS Accommodated, & TAKS-M? Accommodation...

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  • Slide 1
  • Slide 2
  • Where do we look for accommodation information for TAKS, TAKS Accommodated, & TAKS-M? Accommodation information for students who are assessed with TAKS is located in the 2010-2011 Accommodations Manual. Additional resources for TAKS accommodations are located at http://www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/taks/accommodations/. http://www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/taks/accommodations/
  • Slide 3
  • Overview of Major Changes for 2014 Move from 3 types of accommodations to only 2 Many procedures previously listed in the 2013 Optional Test Administration Procedures and Materials document are allowable for any student per the 2014 District and Campus Coordinator Manual. Reminders to stay on task Preferential seating Individual and Small-Group Administrations are no longer considered accommodations but allowable for any student. HB 5 EOC deletions Standardized Oral Administration (SOA) Allowable technology devices clarification Answer document changes
  • Slide 4
  • What are Accommodations for Students with Disabilities? Changes to instructional materials, procedures, or techniques that are made on an individual basis and allow a student with a disability to participate in grade-level or course instruction and testing Should be evaluated regularly to determine effectiveness and to help plan for accommodations the student will need each year Are not changes to the content being assessed and should not replace the teaching of subject-specific knowledge and skills as outlined in the TEKS Should not be provided to an entire group of students, such as those in the same class or disability category
  • Slide 5
  • Which students are eligible for accommodations? Applies to students taking STAAR, STAAR Spanish, STAAR L, STAAR Modified, and TELPAS For purposes of statewide assessments, a student needing accommodations due to a disability includes a student with an identified disability who receives special education services and meets established eligibility criteria for certain accommodations a student with an identified disability who receives Section 504 services and meets established eligibility criteria for certain accommodations a student with a disabling condition who does not receive special education or Section 504 services but meets established eligibility criteria for certain accommodations
  • Slide 6
  • Who has the authority for decision and documentation? Special education services the ARD committee; documented in IEP Section 504 services the 504 placement committee; documented in IAP No special education or Section 504 services the appropriate team of people at the campus level; documentation determined at local level Response to Intervention (RTI) team and student assistance team are examples. This applies to a small number of students. In the case of an ELL, the LPAC works in conjunction with the applicable group; documented in permanent record file
  • Slide 7
  • The Accommodation Triangle Type 1 Type 2
  • Slide 8
  • What is the purpose of the Accommodation Triangle? Organizes accommodations for students with disabilities by type depending on the decision-making authority appropriate team of people at the campus level or approval of an Accommodation Request Form by TEA.
  • Slide 9
  • What accommodations are available?
  • Slide 10
  • This type of PDF document opens when the link to an accommodation in the triangle is clicked.
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  • What are Type 1 Accommodations? Decision made by the appropriate team of people at the campus level based on TEAs accommodation policies 1
  • Slide 12
  • What does Routinely, Independently, and Effectively Mean? Routinely Used often enough that the student is familiar with and comfortable using accommodation on a statewide assessment Not necessarily used every day or in every class Independently Only applicable to some accommodations (e.g., applies to use of a calculator but not to an oral administration) Effectively Accommodation meets student needs as evidenced by data and observations with or without accommodation use.
  • Slide 13
  • What are Type 2 Accommodations? Only for a very small number of students Student must meet all eligibility criteria listed. Appropriate team of people at campus level determines eligibility for listed accommodations or other accommodations not defined in the triangle. Requires the approval of an Accommodation Request Form (ARF) from TEA 2
  • Slide 14
  • What are Type 2 Accommodations? Requires an approved ARF because Type 2 accommodations involve a test administrator handling or manipulating secure test materials or student responses in ways that could compromise test security, confidentiality, and/or student results TEA provides specific guidelines with an approved ARF in order to ensure that Type 2 accommodations are provided in a standardized manner. 2
  • Slide 15
  • What are OTHER Type 2 Accommodations? Any accommodation that is not listed in the triangle can be considered if the student needs it to access the test. Other accommodations can not be requested through the online system. Districts must contact TEA to discuss when the use of an Other accommodation is appropriate.
  • Slide 16
  • Accommodation Request Process How do we request Type 2 Accommodations? Accommodations for Students with Disabilities webpage Accommodation Request Process document outlining the process for requesting Type 2 accommodations Link to the updated online Accommodation Request Form Districts must indicate that a student has met each of the listed eligibility criteria PLUS answer specific questions that detail evidence of student need. Specific questions are included in the online system to help districts complete the rationale section for Type 2 accommodations. This information must be provided in the rationale section of the online Accommodation Request Form.
  • Slide 17
  • Recording Accommodations on the Answer Document GA = general accommodation BR = braille administration LP = large print administration OA = oral administration XD = extra day LA = linguistic accommodation
  • Slide 18
  • How do we document accommodations? Specific information in the 2014 District and Campus Coordinator Manual Mark GA, BR, LP, OA, XD, and/or LA in the blank bubbles for each subject. Mark each accommodation that is documented and made available to a student, even if the student did not use the accommodation during testing.
  • Slide 19
  • How do we determine appropriate accommodations in unexpected or emergency situations? Step 1: Consider test administration procedures and materials allowed for any student (2014 DCCM). There is no need to contact TEA. Step 2: Consider whether a Type 1 accommodation can meet the students needs. Consideration should be given to accommodations that the student can independently use. There is no need to contact TEA. Step 3: If a Type 2 accommodation will be needed, contact TEAs Accommodations Task Force for permission and additional instructions.
  • Slide 20
  • How do we determine appropriate accommodations in unexpected or emergency situations? Example Scenarios Student arrives at school without prescribed eyeglasses try Large Print before an Oral Administration Student arrives at school with dominant arm broken see if student can write math computations on a white board with non- dominant hand (scratch paper allowed for any student who needs it) and dictate responses for the test administrator to transcribe (Basic Transcribing) before requesting Type 2 accommodation-Mathematics Scribe Encouraging student independence should be a priority
  • Slide 21
  • Special Note Regarding Technology Districts are required to have procedures in place to prevent the use of cell phones and personal electronic devices during test administrations. Electronic devices can disrupt the testing environment and compromise the security and confidentiality of the test. When using technology- based accommodations (e.g., calculator), students are NOT permitted Internet access during testing. Also, electronic devices with Internet or photographic capabilities are not allowable.
  • Slide 22
  • Standardized Oral Administration (SOA) For 2014, the following assessments are offered statewide as an online option for oral administration grade 4 reading and mathematics grade 7 reading and mathematics grade 8 science and social studies All guidelines for oral administration apply to SOA. Allows a student to independently select and change his or her level of reading support during the test administration SOA should only be administered to an eligible student for whom the appropriateness of this type of oral administration has been discussed and documented. Online tutorial is available at: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/SOA/ http://www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/SOA/
  • Slide 23
  • How should students be grouped for an Oral Administration? Consider level of reading support pace at which students work number of students one test administrator can handle Plan for mixtures of support level and pace know what level of support each student receives remember the four-hour time limit move around room and read aloud to students individually or to small groups of students working at a similar pace
  • Slide 24
  • What does the phrase evidence of reading difficulty mean? A problem with reading The problem could be caused by a learning disability in reading. The problem could be caused by other conditions, for example ADHD emotional or behavioral disability processing or memory issue The ARD or Section 504 committee decides if the student exhibits evidence of a reading difficulty.
  • Slide 25
  • What does the phrase disability that affects math calculation mean? A problem adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing using paper and pencil The problem could be caused by a learning disability in mathematics. The problem could be caused by other conditions, for example ADHD emotional or behavioral disability processing or memory issue The ARD or Section 504 committee decides if the students disability causes him or her to have a problem calculating with pencil and paper.
  • Slide 26
  • What are the differences in eligibility between Basic Transcribing and Complex Transcribing? Meets at least one of the following The student has an impairment in vision that necessitates the use of braille or large-print test materials. The student has a disabling condition that prevents him or her from independently and effectively recording responses. Local Decision Complex Transcribing Student is unable to effectively use Basic Transcribing. Meets at least one of the following The student has an impairment in vision that necessitates the use of braille or large-print test materials. The student has a physically disabling condition that prevents him or her from independently and effectively recording responses. Accommodation Request Form Required Basic Transcribing
  • Slide 27
  • What are Special Instructions/Considerations for Transcribing? When transcribing a students responses to griddable questions, the test administrator MUST use the Transcribing Griddable Questions document so that the student is aware of the maximum number of boxes available for each answer. The student must be given the full testing time to complete the test. All of the students responses must be initially recorded by the student (e.g., onto scratch paper, the students test booklet, typed) by the end of the time limit. It is recommended that the test administrator ensure that the student makes all responses clearly and completely. Any interaction with the student regarding the intended responses is prohibited after the testing period has ended. If needed, the test administrator may transfer the students final responses onto the answer document after the testing period has ended.
  • Slide 28
  • What are Special Instructions/Considerations for Transcribing? The test administrator must indicate to the student the space allotted for his/her written composition (26 lines) and/or short answer reading responses (10 lines). 26 lines of handwritten text = ~ 1,750 typed characters (including spaces) = ~ 3 or 4 braille pages (depending on the size of braille paper) 10 lines of handwritten text = ~675 typed characters (including spaces) = ~2-3 braille pages (depending on the size of braille paper)
  • Slide 29
  • How many large-print booklets can a district order? Large-print materials should only be ordered for students who meet the eligibility criteria. Districts who order excessive numbers of large- print materials will be flagged for review.
  • Slide 30
  • http://www.tea.state.tx.us/student. assessment/accommodations/ Click this link to see all resources for accommodations for students with disabilities
  • Slide 31
  • Available Resources http://www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/acco mmodations/staar-telpas/ Critical Information about Accommodations Accommodation Policy documents Accommodation Request Process documents Link to online database Training PowerPoints (TETNs, Supplemental Aids, Student Scenarios) Braille, large print, and deaf/hard-of-hearing appendices Font and point size matrices
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